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Thread: Range finder to buy or not?

  1. #1

    Range finder to buy or not?

    Thinking of getting a range finder, are they a worth while bit of kit to have??
    If I buy it will be a lower budget one, probably a hawke, are they any good?
    Cheers for any input

  2. #2
    well to take a view we'd need to know abit about what the intended purpose is...
    if you are stalking over a large amount of ground with varied terrain and taking shots in excess of 150m then probably yes

    if you are shooting at shorter ranges i.e 100m or less or from a fixed point e.g high seat then probably not so much use
    Depends on your gun's zero too....

  3. #3
    Depends what kind of shooting are you doing? how experienced a stalker are you? what sort of range do you normally shoot at? if most of your stalking is woodland I would say not as most shots in woodland are taken a fairly short range, could be usefull on the hill as distances are a bit harder to judge there especially if you are inexperienced, if you are an experienced hill stalker you should be able to judge distances quite accurately out 300 yards or so further than what you are going to be shooting.

    For deer stalking a range finder should not really be necessary,however if you feel it would give you more confidence go for it.

  4. #4
    I have one from my air rifle rabbiting days. I find it useful to while away the time guessing ranges and then ranging them with the rf while passing time waiting for deer in an ambush situation.

    also useful to know certain ranges from a high seat so you are prepared if a deer pops out and you have to make a quick decision.

    One word of caution though, I have a cheapish hawke one and it's useless in anything other than good light.

  5. #5
    I have had a Bushnell yardage-pro for ten years now and its paid for itself ten times over. I now have a Swaro one. There's so many times when it's handy- not just for longer shots. It's amazing how far out your guesses can be.

  6. #6
    I would recommend a rangefinder/binocular as it is just one piece of kit to carry and it is always there when you are glassing, I wouldn't be without my rangefinding binos now.

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by Crosshair243 View Post
    I have had a Bushnell yardage-pro for ten years now and its paid for itself ten times over. I now have a Swaro one. There's so many times when it's handy- not just for longer shots. It's amazing how far out your guesses can be.
    What you say is true, but its amazing how good you can get with practice, when I started there were no range finders at least none readily available, learning to judge distances was part of learning your kraft.

    Even today you won't find many pro stalkers who use a range finder, and certainly not many of the older generation.

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by bogtrotter View Post
    What you say is true, but its amazing how good you can get with practice, when I started there were no range finders at least none readily available, learning to judge distances was part of learning your kraft.

    Even today you won't find many pro stalkers who use a range finder, and certainly not many of the older generation.
    What you say may be true, but I have found mine is a very good way to do that practice. I would suggest that using one is the most efficient way to help you learn to judge distance.

    Take one when you are walking the dog and you can practice on objects all around and not just those which you can count the paces to ahead of you.

    For Air gun and 22lr loopy trajectories on rabbits they are great. While waiting I take readings off a number of tufts in order to be able to allow for my height above zero.

    For learning new ground they are useful. I always tend to over estimate distance in dense woods especially below the CF first zero point. And find I am often mistaken across valleys and gulleys.

    Mine is a Nikon rifle hunter 1000 which has the option to calculate the horizontal distance so you can allow for drop if you are shooting up or down, and the normally black info turns to red if the light is falling or you are looking into shadow.

    Alan

  9. #9
    Bought one. Used it a couple of times until I got bored with it, sold it. Had it for about a month.
    Mark 1 human eye is good enough for me.

  10. #10
    I don't understand why anyone would not want to have or want to get rid of a measuring instrument and prefer to guess.
    "Don't say I didnae warn ye !"

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