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Thread: Reabsorbed Fawn ??

  1. #1

    Reabsorbed Fawn ??

    Shot a Fallow Doe with a broken leg this morning. Spent some time trying to see if she had a fawn at foot or was lactating. Finally managed to see there was no udder so shot her to put her out of her misery.

    On Gralloching I discovered a long & thin hard uterus. I dissected it to reveal a single long bone about five inches long, along with some hair.

    I'm assuming she had an almost fully developed fawn and suffered her leg injury, and the fawn was reabsorbed in order to heal the leg fracture.

    Can anyone offer any more information or opinions.

    Cheers,
    Ff
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  2. #2
    Mummified foetus, has been reported infrequently in deer. Resorption is erroneously over reported when stalkers find more corpora lutea than foetuses especially in roe where blastocyst fails to elongate into trophoblast after diapause leading onto implantation failure in the uterus , sort of insurance policy as monoestrous. All other deer have cyclical oestrus hence reported late young.Sorry for complicated explanation but no simple way around it

  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by morena View Post
    Mummified foetus, has been reported infrequently in deer. Resorption is erroneously over reported when stalkers find more corpora lutea than foetuses especially in roe where blastocyst fails to elongate into trophoblast after diapause leading onto implantation failure in the uterus , sort of insurance policy as monoestrous. All other deer have cyclical oestrus hence reported late young.Sorry for complicated explanation but no simple way around it

    Its easy for you say!

  4. #4
    Any one able to translate,for this thick stalker?

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by morena View Post
    Mummified foetus, has been reported infrequently in deer. Resorption is erroneously over reported when stalkers find more corpora lutea than foetuses especially in roe where blastocyst fails to elongate into trophoblast after diapause leading onto implantation failure in the uterus , sort of insurance policy as monoestrous. All other deer have cyclical oestrus hence reported late young.Sorry for complicated explanation but no simple way around it
    Thank you.

    Ff

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by tony rentokil View Post
    Any one able to translate,for this thick stalker?
    A corpus luteum is a structure left behind on the ovary after ovulation. It's function is to secrete progesterone - a hormone responsible for the maintenance of pregnancy.

    In roe deer more eggs can be ovulated (ie released) but not progress to a pregnancy - a feature of the strange nature of roe reproduction - things don't develop for a while after fertilisation.

    Morena postulates that this may be an 'insurance policy' ie the deer has more eggs fertilised than she needs, as cycling a second time and getting pregnant that way (as in cattle, sheep and most other deer) is not possible.

    I've never seen a mummified fetus in a deer, but that doesn't look like any of the mummified fetuses I have seen in cattle. Usually they have an enlarged horn, full of pussy, dry material with little bones. That uterus looks relatively normal externally with one big bone in there. Strange.

    Section 161 of the Highways Act 1980 (England & Wales) makes it an offence to discharge a firearm within 50 ft of the centre of a highway with vehicular rights without lawful authority or excuse, if as a result a user of the highway is injured, interrupted or endangered.

  7. #7
    Very interesting thanks for posting.

    Would the bone size indicate it nearly at full term?

  8. #8
    I bow to Apache greater knowledge so am wondering could smallenberg be responsible for this kind of thing in this Fallow as I have seen some strange lambs born. Just a few nights ago I helped a friend with a lambing and the first one was just a bag of skin with a leg and some intestines poking out, the second perfectly form but dead

  9. #9
    I think you'd struggle to put it down to SBV. It causes very specific problems and if the doe was unable to calve (assume that is the correct term?) far more would be retained.

    The lamb sounds like a schistosomus reflexus.

    Section 161 of the Highways Act 1980 (England & Wales) makes it an offence to discharge a firearm within 50 ft of the centre of a highway with vehicular rights without lawful authority or excuse, if as a result a user of the highway is injured, interrupted or endangered.

  10. #10
    Thanks Apache
    I had a look and it is very similar, so have learn something today
    Won't go on as don't want to hijack thread

    Firefly thanks for posting, most interesting

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