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Thread: sceptical about bleeding

  1. #1

    sceptical about bleeding

    The venison thread that's just started has reminded me of something I've been sceptical about for a while.

    People frequently emphasise the importance of bleeding a carcasse as quickly as possible.

    However, in my experience, a chest shot deer has done all the bleeding it can do - there's really nothing more you can do to extract any more blood.

    Even with head shot deer, unless the heart is still pumping, sticking a knife into the chest appears to achieve very little - the biggest loss of blood seems to come when you sever the blood vessels associated with the liver.

    Thoughts?

  2. #2
    I get as much blood out of the chest cavity I don't want it drying and congealing in there. But a chest shot deer has done all the bleeding it can really just don't leave it to long in there.

  3. #3
    I disagree (with the greatest of respect)

    a knife in the front of the chest always allows a good gush of blood out , it doesn't take long for it to come out in globs either the congealing process starts quite soon.

    why do you think they bleed animals in slaughter houses?
    Right where's those stones , I'll start !

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by tackb View Post
    I disagree (with the greatest of respect)

    a knife in the front of the chest always allows a good gush of blood out , it doesn't take long for it to come out in globs either the congealing process starts quite soon.

    why do you think they bleed animals in slaughter houses?
    That blood is only just in the chest cavity though rather than through the meat and organs. I'm assuming that the blood is removed as quickly as possible in a slaughter house to stop it from congealing within the 'good bits' and tainting the meat but may be wrong and would be good to hear from those that know more about it than I.

    I personally like to get all the blood out quickly so it doesn't congeal and become harder to remove (as said above) and also so it doesn't run out into the car boot liner!

  5. #5
    When us keepers shoot marauding stags or the hinds in the winter, we neck shoot to save as much meat as possible so the knife into just above the chest cavity pointing towards the tail takes out a lot of the blood. When a guest shoots a stag in the heart/lungs (boiler room) I tend to bleed them back. This means doing the gralloch as normal and then piercing the membrane that takes you into the area of the pluck. You can then scoop out as much blood as possible whilst it allows you to tell the guest exactly where the shot went i.e great heart shot sir or whatever has happened by having a quick inspection of the shot area. You'd be surprised at the amount of blood that comes out like that. Sometimes I even bleed them in both ways if they've landed awkwardly. The trick is to pierce the membrane all the way around as close to the ribs as possible without damaging the rib meat and do so on the side which the stag is lying (its right side is easier as that's the side it's on when you gralloch). It's simple and straightforward after a try or two.

    All the best,


    Scott

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by ChrisWill184 View Post
    That blood is only just in the chest cavity though rather than through the meat and organs. I'm assuming that the blood is removed as quickly as possible in a slaughter house to stop it from congealing within the 'good bits' and tainting the meat but may be wrong and would be good to hear from those that know more about it than I.

    I personally like to get all the blood out quickly so it doesn't congeal and become harder to remove (as said above) and also so it doesn't run out into the car boot liner!
    where do you think it goes if you leave it in there?
    Right where's those stones , I'll start !

  7. #7
    The first medium to decompose is the blood and this is exacerbated by other cavity contents caused by damage to viscera by hydrostatic shock..fact

  8. #8
    you can never get all the blood out unless as you say there is pressure from within.
    the natural vacuum that comes from liquid draining from a soft vessel prevents it all coming out.
    you want to drain the muscles not just the vessels
    the more holes the better to enable that

    even if you cut the aorta on a chest shot deer and you will always see some blood coming out

    I tend to empty chest and abdomen in one, within minutes of the shot, even on big deer heading back to the larder so I am already cutting the aorta from the inside when doing it.
    if there is any residual heart beat a quick aorta cut helps
    good to get some gravity involved as that can really help

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by tackb View Post
    where do you think it goes if you leave it in there?
    Well surely by only sticking the knife in the front of the chest to bleed out you are only removing the blood from in the chest cavity. What I was trying to say is that if you left it in there a few extra minutes it wouldn't do much harm in relation to the rest of the animal as it's not going anywhere and a good proportion of the rest of the blood will have pumped out to the surroundings. As the chest contents are likely to be obliterated I wouldn't think there to much left of edible offal to be worried about. I can see your point for saving rib meat perhaps.

    Back to the OP, at the end of the day when we talk about bleeding it out I assume it is done within about half an hour (or there abouts) of the actual shot allowing for settling time after the shot, getting it to a suitable spot for the gralloch etc, etc. Can't imagine the blood left behind on a chest shot animal would do much harm in that time frame. Does anyone have a particular situation where it is impractical to do this in the field and the blood has to be left in there for a longer period of time?

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by tackb View Post
    a knife in the front of the chest always allows a good gush of blood out , it doesn't take long for it to come out in globs either the congealing process starts quite soon.

    why do you think they bleed animals in slaughter houses?
    I think that in slaughter houses, the heart is still beating, so it actively pumps the majority out. With a chest shot deer, the blood has been pumped (or leaked) into the chest cavity (or the countryside) - so you're not really 'bleeding' it when you stick it or gralloch it - you're just emptying out the pooled blood. I do do this, and as quickly as I can. But I don't think it's going anywhere - and it's certainly not going back into the tissues.

    I suppose it depends on how you gralloch: I take everything out on the spot (red and green), so any blood pooled in the thorax comes out then. But if you only do the green, then it is worth sticking it in the traditional spot to empty out the thorax. But I doubt it will really make any difference to the carcasse quality, since that blood is already out of the muscles and tissues.

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