Results 1 to 7 of 7

Thread: .204 ruger load data

  1. #1

    .204 ruger load data

    Anybody have some load data on a 39gr sbk with viht N133?

  2. #2
    21.5-25.3 according to the Vhitavouri book for a 40gr.
    Sako TRG-42 folder .338LM🔫 Sako TRG-22 .308/.260🔫 Tikka 595 .222(NV'd up) 🔫 AR15 .223/300BLK 🔫Franchi 12g 520 9shot🔫Baikal .410 stealth🔫Ruger #1.243

    Home | Varminting UK

  3. #3
    The bore on your rifle is as individual as you are. My advice would be to do an OCW test with the bullets seated around SAMMI spec, perhaps starting at 23 gr of N133 and going up in .2 gr increments watching for any signs of pressure as you increase powder volume. Once you find an acceptable powder weight then use that weight to play around with the distance from the lands.


    There are very good powders for the 204 using 39gr BKs that include H322 and BL-C(2) but hard to source. Personally I think N133 tops them anyway and is easier to obtain.


    Bear in mind that the most important part of your reloading is case prep - you need to make every case a clone of the next and really for an OCW test you should consider keeping your empty cases around the same weight to give your rifle a fair chance with this test.

  4. #4
    Thanks Peter, I have 2 kg of N133 so that is reason for asking. I could not find any loads that specifically were using N133 with the 39gr sbk's. If I were to use a load from the manual using a 40gr vmax with N133 would that be a good place to start? Or is that not good/safe practice?

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by s8mdevo View Post
    Thanks Peter, I have 2 kg of N133 so that is reason for asking. I could not find any loads that specifically were using N133 with the 39gr sbk's. If I were to use a load from the manual using a 40gr vmax with N133 would that be a good place to start? Or is that not good/safe practice?
    The online Vihtavuori site states 23.1 gr to 25.3 gr (for a 40 gr bullet) Bearing in mind you plan to use a bullet 1 gr less, then there should be no problem. As a general rule within a calibre the heavier the bullet weight the less powder required.

    If I had your rifle here, I would do an OCW test starting at 23.5 with .2 increments up to 24.9 gr (8 targets) but as already stated above, watch for pressure signs as you go up. Most of my friends with 204 load using Federal Gold primers.

    Re an OCW test, I normally shoot 39gr BKs but in a panic should I run out of BKs, I bought some 40gr VMax as an insurance and did a OCW test and this was the result - Bear in mind this is not a 204 Ruger but a 20 Tac - however the bullets were seated where I usually seat the 39 s

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	40 Gr vmax development 20 TAC.jpg 
Views:	34 
Size:	116.7 KB 
ID:	46562

    PS - a friend of mine with a custom 204 with 39 gr uses 25.2 gr of N133 but don't try this until you have exhausted the weights well below this.
    Last edited by PeterH; 05-09-2014 at 11:52.

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by PeterH View Post
    Bear in mind that the most important part of your reloading is case prep - you need to make every case a clone of the next and really for an OCW test you should consider keeping your empty cases around the same weight to give your rifle a fair chance with this test.
    I think that in theory this is a good idea, but in practice, it would require a lot of juggling of load and cases to make every subsequent loading "fair". Weighing cases is not something that was done when the loads were developed by the data providers. They used well prepped brass - same manufacturer, LOT, and length, but that is about it. They want their data to reflect the inherent variances found between individual pieces of brass. The 204 is a varmint rifle, not a bench rest gun, and very good accuracy is not that hard to obtain. V-V powders are not common in my region, but H322 has been a serious winner in my CZ Varmint with the 40 grain VM and delivered half MOA, five shot groups from the start. Comparing the 32's and the 40's, ballistically, makes me wonder why anyone bothers with the 32's. The 40's are just a superior bullet down range. JMHO~Muir

  7. #7
    Whilst I agree with what you say Muir, my take on this was to find the 'perfect' load for just the OCW test and with the small cases like the 204, weight differences can be another reason why a good group can become an OK group discounting the dreaded human error.. Obviously once the OP has found the best combination to suit his rifle, future weighing of cases may not be a priority in the loading process.


    I just so happen to always batch weigh my Tac cases really for two reasons - firstly I have been retired for almost 20 years so it gives me something to do while I wait around in God's departure lounge and secondly, it rains a lot here so I have plenty of time to play with reloading.

    Peter

Similar Threads

  1. .204 ruger
    By 6.5x55 in forum Rifles & Calibres
    Replies: 16
    Last Post: 25-02-2014, 16:15
  2. 204 Ruger
    By 6pt-sika in forum Rifles & Calibres
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 05-12-2013, 21:59
  3. Wanted .204 ruger
    By redlab in forum Firearms
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 20-05-2013, 20:19
  4. .204 ruger
    By vulpinehunter in forum Rifles & Calibres
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 26-06-2012, 18:43
  5. .204 ruger
    By bigdan in forum Rifles & Calibres
    Replies: 28
    Last Post: 25-03-2012, 11:33

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •