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Thread: Why is 6.5x47 Lapua so expensive?

  1. #1

    Why is 6.5x47 Lapua so expensive?

    Is there any reason why cases, dies, gauges etc for the 6.5x47 Lapua should be so expensive? It's not a proprietary cartridge, being CIP/SAAMI listed, so can any maker chamber it or produce reloading gear without paying royalties to Lapua? I just don't know why Lapua brass in 308 should cost 60/100 but Lapua brass in 6.5x47 costs 120/100. Reloading dies seem to be similarly marked up over more common calibres.

    I'd like to get a rifle re-barrelled to 6.5x47, but hate the idea that I'd be gouged for the required equipment. The 6.5 Creedmoor looks much better value, even the loaded ammo from Hornady is reasonably priced.

  2. #2
    Simple- volume. Reloading parts is all about mass manufacturing processes. The bigger the batch numbers, the smaller the individual manufacturing cost.

    That and fashion. Numpties paying a premium to be different. It'll only get more expensive as its left behind for the next 'must have' calibres too.

  3. #3
    Are you comparing like with like? There is virtually no difference in price between Forster .308 and 6.5x47 dies; Hornady New Dimension dies are virtually the same for .308, 6.5x47 and 6.5 Creedmoor; Whidden dies are the same price for all calibres too.

    As for brass, I can only assume that it is economies of scale - a lot more .308 brass is produced and shot than 6.5x47 or Creedmoor. Nosler brass for the Creedmoor is also much more expensive than Hornady, which I assume is both a quality thing (Nosler made by Norma, arguably the closest in quality to Lapua) as well as a marketing thing (Hornady pushing the Creedmoor which it created).

    As for the cost of a gauge, I don't think that would sway any decision in the overall scheme of things.

    So as I see it, you save about 20/100 on brass by buying Nosler Creedmoor cases over Lapua 6.5x47 cases. That is if you can find any Nosler brass at all... I don't think you will find Hornady brass to be near the same consistency or quality, but if you are wiling to give it a try let us know how what you find out and how many cycles they last.

    I wouldn't pay for a custom barrel and then shoot factory loads unless it was a much more common calibre that I could find anywhere in the UK, so that wouldn't sway my decision either.

    So in the grand scheme of things, you can probably save any differences in reloading equipment and supplies cost by choosing a different brand of barrel or different rifle smith to do the work...

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by M275 View Post
    Is there any reason why cases, dies, gauges etc for the 6.5x47 Lapua should be so expensive? It's not a proprietary cartridge, being CIP/SAAMI listed, so can any maker chamber it or produce reloading gear without paying royalties to Lapua? I just don't know why Lapua brass in 308 should cost 60/100 but Lapua brass in 6.5x47 costs 120/100. Reloading dies seem to be similarly marked up over more common calibres.

    I'd like to get a rifle re-barrelled to 6.5x47, but hate the idea that I'd be gouged for the required equipment. The 6.5 Creedmoor looks much better value, even the loaded ammo from Hornady is reasonably priced.
    120/100 ?? That's cheap mate.

    Get y'self a .338 lap mag. 290/100 then.
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  5. #5
    Get a 260rem
    Right where's those stones , I'll start !

  6. #6
    As already said volume. Very high quality standards applied to this product - it's in the same class as 220 Russian (the base for the PPCs used in Bench Rest competition). Non-standard features such as a 1.5mm flash-hole. Steep shoulder angle - the steeper the shoulder, the greater the failure and rejection rate in production. the 6.5 Creedmoor and 6.5 Lapua at 30-deg are as steep as mnaufacturers go and they're generally not keen on it. The 308 and 260's 20-deg shoulder cases are much easier to make.

  7. #7
    Thanks for the replies, they're all very valid.

    I suppose what prompted the question was looking round the trade stands at the Trafalgar meeting at Bisley. Not only were the Lapua cases expensive, but looking at all the dies on Norman Clark's stand they had plenty of dies for 50-90, but get to the 6.5x47 dies and they're 250.

    Going through the Redding catalogue I can see why, Redding only make bushing dies for the 6.5x47 and not the regular versions, plus the 6.5x47 is Category III so the dies are 50% more expensive than normal calibres in Category I. Redding don't yet make a Competition set for the 6.5x47, but when they do I'll bet it's 320 over here.

    Needless to say, 6.5mm match bullets are pretty expensive too, if you get A-Max, Sierra, Berger or Lapua.

    I'm using new old-stock Lapua D46 170gn in .308 at present, and they only cost me 12.50/100. Lapua brass is 55-60/100 and I'm already set up to reload it. I'm starting to see a lower-cost re-barrelling alternative..
    Last edited by M275; 20-10-2014 at 11:21. Reason: Typo!

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by scotsgun View Post
    That and fashion. Numpties paying a premium to be different. It'll only get more expensive as its left behind for the next 'must have' calibres too.

    got to agree.

    it's a fad/must have calibre etc etc, once the fuss calms down and no one wants it then the parts will be collecting dust on the shelf like many others.

    bob.
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  9. #9
    When I started looking at rifles I checked out the cost of brass, powder etc and availability then I decided to get a 308. It works and has a good barrel life. If however you need the advantages of the 6.5x47L then it does come at an additional expense

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by bobjs View Post
    got to agree.

    it's a fad/must have calibre etc etc, once the fuss calms down and no one wants it then the parts will be collecting dust on the shelf like many others.

    bob.
    Yep. Just like all these .20 cals. .20 Tac etc. all 'fad' calibers.
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