Results 1 to 3 of 3

Thread: identifying copper fouling, rust and pitting

  1. #1

    identifying copper fouling, rust and pitting

    Probably a question that gets asked a lot but...

    ... I'd be very grateful if anyone had any 'dummies tips' for telling the difference between copper fouling, rust and pitting in a barrel.

    I'm fairly certain I can identify copper fouling (and I know it's there if wet patches come out blue), but the others I'm not so sure.

    I know that in many cases, it actually doesn't make much difference - but it would be nice to know what I'm looking at.

    Thanks

  2. #2
    Mungo you forgot two other issues to look for - wear to the thrust faces of the lands & heat crazing.
    I suppose the only way to tell the difference is to use a good quality bore scope - then you should be able to see what is there.
    It won't however tell you is if a barrel will still shoot well. - There's only one way to find that out & that is shooting it.
    What you may be able to gauge (guess) is how much life there may be left in a barrel - not much more.
    I had my 223 bore scoped a couple of years ago - there are pits in it, the first few inches up from the chamber is crazed, the front thrust faces of the rifling are well worn back & the lands are worn down ---- It still shoots ok - sub inch 20 shot groups at 100yds with undeveloped loads. My only problem is when do I decide to rebarrel it!

    Ian

  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by Yorric View Post
    Mungo you forgot two other issues to look for - wear to the thrust faces of the lands & heat crazing.
    I suppose the only way to tell the difference is to use a good quality bore scope - then you should be able to see what is there.
    It won't however tell you is if a barrel will still shoot well. - There's only one way to find that out & that is shooting it.
    What you may be able to gauge (guess) is how much life there may be left in a barrel - not much more.
    I had my 223 bore scoped a couple of years ago - there are pits in it, the first few inches up from the chamber is crazed, the front thrust faces of the rifling are well worn back & the lands are worn down ---- It still shoots ok - sub inch 20 shot groups at 100yds with undeveloped loads. My only problem is when do I decide to rebarrel it!

    Ian
    Thankyou for a very interesting and helpful post. If decent borescopes were available as standard issue I think most shooters would be horrified to see the avoidable damage they inflict.

    .223 rifles probably suffer the most abuse as there is so much military surplus & dirt cheap crappy ammo around. I simply wouldn't touch a used .223, but would go for a .222 as this needs reloads or expensive commercial SP.

    I've witnessed .223's shot so rapidly with FMJ that users have burnt themselves touching the barrel. Moderators exascerbate this situation. The internal temperatures are so high that heat crazing and cracking of the bore is inevitable, or in worse cases the forward part of the rifling is just washed out & eroded.
    If I'm going to be accused of it then it's just as well I did it.

Similar Threads

  1. pitting
    By Olly.243 in forum Cleaning, Gunsmithing and Equipment Care
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 08-11-2014, 10:13
  2. Cleqning copper fouling from a barrel
    By Muir in forum Cleaning, Gunsmithing and Equipment Care
    Replies: 17
    Last Post: 30-08-2013, 11:49
  3. detecting rust and pitting
    By Mungo in forum Cleaning, Gunsmithing and Equipment Care
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 20-04-2013, 07:23
  4. Brass/Copper Fouling in my barrel
    By Clive1967 in forum Rifles & Calibres
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: 31-05-2012, 08:54
  5. anyone got a remedy for Rust pitting on barrel?
    By johnnythefox70 in forum Cleaning, Gunsmithing and Equipment Care
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 22-05-2011, 13:44

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •