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Thread: small write up from shooting times on TB

  1. #1

    small write up from shooting times on TB

    Is it Just me reading it wrong, or are they saying its ok to put a contaminated carcass in the food chain??

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  2. #2
    Quote Originally Posted by AndrewT059 View Post
    Is it Just me reading it wrong, or are they saying its ok to put a contaminated carcass in the food chain??

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    I read it the same way!!!!!
    Sako 75 6.5x55mm-Z6i 3-18x50. MauserM12 .308-SIII 6-24x50. Beretta 690 III Field 12b.
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  3. #3
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    The guidance in the article is saying you can put it in the food chain, yes.

    Your status as a 'Trained Hunter' means you are ultimately responsible for the decision. Guidance is that minimal signs make the carcass acceptable - bear in mind there are loads of reasons for enlarged nodes etc.
    If I think a carcass has clear signs in more than one area, it is condemned, rather than take the risk. If it is marginal, I look at the overall condition of the animal (standard first principles anyway) and make a decision from there.

    There is no evidence (to my knowledge) that says bTB can be transmitted though eating the meat of an infected animal. It's a respiratory disease. Someone more knowledgeable then me will no doubt comment on transmission.
    Last edited by Eric the Red; 04-12-2014 at 14:23.
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  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by AndrewT059 View Post
    Is it Just me reading it wrong, or are they saying its ok to put a contaminated carcass in the food chain??

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	TB.jpg 
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    the following link should be of interest! (Especially para on meat hygiene)
    http://www.thedeerinitiative.co.uk/u...guides/119.pdf

  5. #5
    Thanks for the replies Gents, I just thought a deer with suspected B TB was a complete no no to the food chain,
    Last edited by AndrewT059; 04-12-2014 at 16:23.

  6. #6
    To summarise the guidance posted in the link above:


    1. Under the Tuberculosis (Deer) Order 1989 (as amended) suspicion of TB in any deer (or carcase) whether farmed, park or wild, must be notified to the Duty Vet at your local Animal Health Office.
    2. If you suspect bTB in deer you should isolate the carcase and notify the Duty Vet at your local Animal Health Office, who will provide guidance and may arrange for collection of the appropriate tissue samples for bacteriological culture at the Veterinary Laboratories Agency (VLA).
    3. Samples (usually individual lymph nodes) must be absolutely free of contamination, placed in a sterile sealed container and may be refrigerated, but not frozen, before being sent.
    4. Initially, isolate suspect carcasses from others to prevent contact. Provided it is otherwise healthy and in good condition and there is no other reason to retain it, a carcass from which samples have been removed can then go into the food chain as normal.
    5. If the carcass is delivered to an AGHE the details of any abnormalities must be provided with the carcass, as required by the Wild Game Meat Regulations.


    http://www.thedeerinitiative.co.uk/u...guides/119.pdf

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by AndrewT059 View Post
    Thanks for the replies Gents, I just thought a deer with suspected B TB was a complete no no to the food chain,
    Where do you think all the reactor beef goes?
    Yum yum!

    So you gralloch your deer and find something suspicious with the lymph nodes/lungs/growths etc (don't forget tb infection can be very subtle) you ring the duty vet and ask for advice, samples are taken, at this stage it is only suspected, it could be anything, so you could deliver it to the AGHE with a note stating your findings, as a trained hunter have you not followed the rules correctly?
    Then 6 months later (if you are lucky) the vet contacts you to advise yes tb or no, if its a no they do not inform you what it might have been.

    Cheers

    Richard

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