Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 16

Thread: Cooking whole roe boned haunch

  1. #1

    Cooking whole roe boned haunch

    I've looked at a few recipes on here but am not sure whether to cook slow as some recommend or normal roast times.
    I am a bit biased as I reckon slow is more suited to shoulder / neck meat.
    Hugh F-W (River cottage) was on last night with the Sika haunch and that looked good (normal roast but wrapped in a caul)
    Cooking a meal for a few guests and obviously don't want to ruin it.
    Opinions and experience please.
    Thanks.
    "Don't say I didnae warn ye !"

  2. #2
    I've done this with muntjac as well as CWD haunch, and it is a total winner, a worthy use of a noble part of the animal. Take a big, heavy casserole dish (I use one of those cast iron, enamelled ones), put some chopped onions, garlic, tomatoes or whatever vegetables take your fancy in the bottom. Potatoes too if you like. If you have any venison bones, put some in the bottom of the dish to put the haunch on top of. First of all it stops the meat from sticking to the bottom, but more to the point it really makes a difference to the sauce. Last time I did it I had some slices of calf's marrow bone (like in Osso Bucco) which was brilliant as the marrow melts into the sauce and enriches it. It doesn't have to be venison bones. Then stick the whole lot into the oven for something like five hours with the lid on at 100-120 degrees C. You can muck around with seasonings, vegetables, etc as you wish, but that's the bare bones of it.

  3. #3
    Preheat oven to 200*
    wrap haunch in bacon
    cook at above temp for 15 mins/450g + 30mins

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by private fraser View Post
    I've looked at a few recipes on here but am not sure whether to cook slow as some recommend or normal roast times.
    I am a bit biased as I reckon slow is more suited to shoulder / neck meat.
    Hugh F-W (River cottage) was on last night with the Sika haunch and that looked good (normal roast but wrapped in a caul)
    Cooking a meal for a few guests and obviously don't want to ruin it.
    Opinions and experience please.
    Thanks.

    I cooked a roe haunch last Fridayand I couldent get hold of any caul so I just ussed the fattyest streeky backon I could find.

    Salt and peper over the haunch then lay a good two packs of streeky bakon out on the baking tray with overlapping joints. Put some bay leaves and rosmary sprigs on the backon than lay on the haunch. More rosmary and bay leaves on the meet then seel in with the bakon ensuring that its fulley covered.


    Pre heated oven to 210c and in she goes for about 40mins Covered in foil

    Then i take the joint out to stand for 45mins minimum Covered in foil

    meen time I am doing the rosties.

    Drop the temp to 170 then in for another 15-20mins uncovered to brown & heat through before again taking it out to rest whilst I sort out veg and plates and carry over to the table for carving. (thats probably 15-20mins)


    Doing it this way I get rare meet after about the first 20mm but less blood in the middle. If I slow cook it on 170 tends to dry out and I hate that Cooking for an hour then standing I find the outer 20m is too well cooked (read hard & tough) and I loose too much juse from the meet.

    The double oven method has served me well

    HTH

    Mark

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by Pine Marten View Post
    I've done this with muntjac as well as CWD haunch, and it is a total winner, a worthy use of a noble part of the animal. Take a big, heavy casserole dish (I use one of those cast iron, enamelled ones), put some chopped onions, garlic, tomatoes or whatever vegetables take your fancy in the bottom. Potatoes too if you like. If you have any venison bones, put some in the bottom of the dish to put the haunch on top of. First of all it stops the meat from sticking to the bottom, but more to the point it really makes a difference to the sauce. Last time I did it I had some slices of calf's marrow bone (like in Osso Bucco) which was brilliant as the marrow melts into the sauce and enriches it. It doesn't have to be venison bones. Then stick the whole lot into the oven for something like five hours with the lid on at 100-120 degrees C. You can muck around with seasonings, vegetables, etc as you wish, but that's the bare bones of it.
    me too.
    had some excellent results with slow cooking. my best was stuffed with fresh corriander loads of fresh ginger and a few other bits garlic butter etc. then frozen for about 3 months defrosted and slow cooked for over 3 hours

  6. #6
    totally agree on slow cooked but higher temp for me and always a bottle of white wine in the mix.after 4/5 hours it reduces to a beutifull rich creamy sauce wrapped piece of pleasure

  7. #7
    Have decided to go the slow route as some guests would probably faint at the sight of a decently red in the middle joint.
    White,not red ?
    Thanks
    Last edited by private fraser; 16-12-2014 at 21:20.
    "Don't say I didnae warn ye !"

  8. #8
    Chicken, not Venison.

    I do recall seeing Heston BloomingHech saying to cook Chicken until the thickest part of the meat gets to 62C (best advice is 75C). This is done on a low heat, down to you how long it takes. You use a thermometer to check. I have one with a probe on a wire so you can check in realtime. Then leave uncovered for 45 minutes to rest. Then, with oven on max, give it 10 minutes to crisp up the skin.

    VERY juicy chicken.

    I would think the same applies to most meats. Long slow to get to say 75C and then a long rest. Blast heat to finish off the outside (blowtorch?) and then done.

    It's serving on a warm plate with hot gravy that makes the roast, not a piece of HOT meat.

    Stan

  9. #9
    the white just gives a better flavour to the meat imho .its down to personal taste but me and swmbo prefer white for venison.larger shock horror also goes well to moisten currys.atb

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by tozzybum View Post
    the white just gives a better flavour to the meat imho .its down to personal taste but me and swmbo prefer white for venison.larger shock horror also goes well to moisten currys.atb
    White wine is better at breaking down sinews.

    P

Similar Threads

  1. Barbecued butterflied roe haunch
    By Pine Marten in forum Carcass Prep, Butchery & Recipes
    Replies: 37
    Last Post: 25-08-2016, 22:11
  2. Slow cooked roe haunch
    By Glyn 1 in forum Carcass Prep, Butchery & Recipes
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 21-10-2013, 22:24
  3. Roast roe haunch recipe????
    By palmer_mike in forum Carcass Prep, Butchery & Recipes
    Replies: 13
    Last Post: 08-06-2013, 10:40
  4. Cooking munty haunch
    By stig in forum Deer Stalking General
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 30-09-2011, 22:44
  5. roe haunch
    By tika.308 in forum Carcass Prep, Butchery & Recipes
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 09-01-2008, 12:46

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •