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Thread: Easiest tastiest way to cook pheasant

  1. #1

    Easiest tastiest way to cook pheasant

    Hi all,
    I've been given a brace of pheasant by my father in law via his retired keeper friend. I've eaten it a few times, but never cooked it. It's a bit of a novelty and a treat for us (no way I'm paying supermarket prices for it!) so I want it right first time. What's best for a traditional Sunday roast type result?
    Hints, tips, dos, don'ts?
    See my blog for - My kindly sponsored DSC1 course and chart my progress from deer virgin to stalking veteran
    AND my new puppy progress DIARY
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  2. #2
    I always brine my pheasant before roasting. Assuming they're plucked and ready to go, dissolve half a cup of plain table salt in hot water. Add a couple of tablespoons of brown sugar, some garlic & a crushed star anise & peppercorns. (you can add rosemary, thyme, bayleaf or any other herbs you like too) Make the volume up to half a gallon or so with cold water. Make sure the brine's chilled, then add the birds & make sure they're submerged for at least 6 hours (overnight is better)

    Then just roast them at around 180C for half an hour (check & give them a wee bit longer if they need it, until the juices run clear). The brine will reduce the standard cooking time, but also keep the birds beautifully-moist

  3. #3
    plucking pheasants is tricky and a chore,
    I usually rip the skin off ,cut out the breasts and legs
    check for lead shot
    cook with bacon covered with foil,
    or cook as "cock au vin"

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by badbob View Post
    plucking pheasants is tricky and a chore
    Do you scald them first? Dip them in 70C water for half a minute prior to plucking them if you've never tried it. The feathers more or less just 'rub' off. Once you try it you'll never go back

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by badbob View Post
    plucking pheasants is tricky and a chore,
    I usually rip the skin off ,cut out the breasts and legs
    check for lead shot
    cook with bacon covered with foil,
    or cook as "cock au vin"
    Mine were already plucked and frozen when given to me
    See my blog for - My kindly sponsored DSC1 course and chart my progress from deer virgin to stalking veteran
    AND my new puppy progress DIARY
    Blog

  6. #6
    I'm another one that has a hard time plucking them (although I haven't yet tried the scalding trick).

    Anyway, I usually just put the breasts and legs through a meat grinder and make a terrine (dried cranberries and pecans go nicely, as do dried apricots and pistachios).

    Cheers,
    Jeff.

  7. #7
    SD Regular NorthDorset's Avatar
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    Not maybe the very best video of the technique but



    Then treat as Coq-au-vin
    Yes I should have taken the Blue Pill!

    We were so busy congratulating ourself of dodging Orwells vision we marched right into Huxley's.

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by NorthDorset View Post
    Not maybe the very best video of the technique but



    Then treat as Coq-au-vin
    Never seen that before! I'm going to give it a go tomorrow.

    Cheers

  9. #9
    Butter, bacon, oven.

  10. #10
    SD Regular NorthDorset's Avatar
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    Old Countrymans trick. Waste of time plucking them. Takes so long for such little reward.
    Yes I should have taken the Blue Pill!

    We were so busy congratulating ourself of dodging Orwells vision we marched right into Huxley's.

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