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Thread: How do you know when Brass is get past it

  1. #1

    How do you know when Brass is get past it

    I am now on forth or fifth reload on some of my 7x65R RWS brass. It all looks fine to me, but how do I tell if it is getting long in the tooth. It does feel quite hard to resize, but always has done so, and probably lack of enough lube on the inside of the case. I am not loading it particularly high, ie quite a mild load, but wanting to work up another lod with a heavier bullet at a bit more throttle for longer range big stuff.

  2. #2
    I can't say when to discard brass other than when it splits, the wall thickness starts changing (incipient head separation) or primer pockets enlarge. ---- If you value your brass & especially before running up a new loading I strongly recommend annealing all your cases before the next sizing operation.

    Ian

  3. #3
    Visually inspect it, and check the lengths basically. If using a relatively light load it can last for a long time...there are plenty of people out there with brass that's seen years of use with no annealing.

    regards,
    Gixer

  4. #4
    I discard my cases when they become too long after their 4th trim, typically 8-12 times fired. If you are having trouble resizing this may be due to insufficient lube.

    atb Tim

  5. #5
    lots of signs

    - thin case head to body boundary (test with fine pick/bent paper clip)
    - thin necks (also an indication of thin bodies from cases continually growing and being trimmed, unlikely in 7x57 TBH)
    - poor neck obturation due to work hardening (fixable with annealing before discarding)
    -splits (extreme IMO)

    none of these is particularly likely in a low load large case scenario

    I have low to medium charge .270 cases on 8, 9, 10 firings without issue

    Personally I find RWS brass quite hard anyway so would expect the neck obturation to be your first indicator

  6. #6
    Just as a note, I spoke with an elderly gentleman at the range 2 days ago who had a rather accurate 260, he was telling me it was a very light load and that some of the cases were on about 40 firings!

    some of my 223 is on its seventh, but I tend to discard it more due to the dents the AR puts in the cases as it throws them out the ejection port.

    regards,
    Gixer

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by Heym SR20 View Post
    I am now on forth or fifth reload on some of my 7x65R RWS brass. It all looks fine to me, but how do I tell if it is getting long in the tooth. It does feel quite hard to resize, but always has done so, and probably lack of enough lube on the inside of the case. I am not loading it particularly high, ie quite a mild load, but wanting to work up another lod with a heavier bullet at a bit more throttle for longer range big stuff.
    I know what you mean about RWS brass - I've got Federal in 7x64 (a rarity) & RWS in 7x65R, and what a difference there is in effort using the same dies & lubrication. If using rimmed cases like you, I'd be neck-sizing only (as in .303) so 'web-thinning' wouldn't happen. The stretch ring mark from this is usually visible as a warning before the paper clip test works.

    I don't think there's a fail-safe objective test. As I understand it, 'annealing' is only done to neck & shoulder but 'work-hardened' cases will split anywhere including the extraction groove in rimless.

    I discard all my cases after the 6th firing out of habit, and the whole batch of 50 if a neck splits on just one. The long-necked case types like .222 (particulary the Winchester crap) and .270 were more likely to split here and go in the bin.

    Frequently trimmed cases thicken rather than thin at the neck, but I've never needed to do this more than once or very rarely twice. Splitting here will also depend on how tight or slack the neck bit of your chamber is too. You'll probably know the answer to this already from inserting a bullet for fit in a fired case.
    If I'm going to be accused of it then it's just as well I did it.

  8. #8

  9. #9
    Heym I've found RWS 8x57irs cases to be excellant for longevity. I tend to find that the primer pockets go slack before I have any problems with neck splitting. My loads are only moderate being for a break action rifle.
    It's the calibre of the shooter that counts not the calibre of the rifle.

  10. #10
    I'd say anneal them and carry on reloading. Re-anneal after each three firings. Ensure the primers fit correctly and aren't a 'loose' fit. ATB
    Blaser K95 Luxus Kipplaufbüchse .25-06Rem. Zeiss 8x56, 110gn Nosler Accubond = Game Over!

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