2014 Fox tally

Cyres

Well-Known Member
Just reviewed 2014 and me and my shooting buddy accounted for 48 foxs on my ground last year. Equall split of sexs and 2 misses. So it works out at nearly 2 a trip. Normally get out lamping once a week, but last years activities severly curtailed by bad weather and one bit of ground currently off limits.

Intrestingly buddy shots moore on the lamp than I do, but then again I tend to do all the spotting. 13 months use of HD38S.
I tend to get out solo durring silage time and dont need to lamp so much.

I shot nearly 3 x as many vixens as he does.

if we add in all the ones he shoots for others I expect we are in the 100+ region which is quite respectable.

Hopefully might be a better year, managed to shoot one sat am in the snow and last night I shot two in swamp conditions with the .204 and DP, it is an excellent bit of kit. Another huge one to get on the chicken farm.

D
 

Cyres

Well-Known Member
Thats no way to speak about him, he has the 38S so probably finds them for you to shoot.

D
 

.243 t3

Well-Known Member
I had 176 last year , and shot 18 this year so hopefully beat last years total fingers crossed .
 

griffshrek

Well-Known Member
I managed 87 foxes last year (1/1/14---1/1/15) I normally shoot between 100+ ---125 but lost 2 soild months due to work commitment .
60% of the foxes were dog foxes . I had 3 runners after being hit 2 were recovered within 50m of the impact point one was never recovered .
All foxes shot with .204 Ruger + 32gr Zmax bullets , no bullet exit on H/L shots the only bullet exits I got was if fox shot bit far back in gut area or neck shots .
Most foxes shot between 120m--170m from tripod

The foxes shot at night / evening were mostly taken 1hr before sundown to 2-3 hrs after ( no long lamping sessions)
Daytime foxes shot mostly using Foxpro and hand callers with a electronic furry jiggily thing for visual reference in open fields all times of day

Biggest dog fox 21lbs
Biggest vixen 17lbs
 

Fireman sam

Well-Known Member
The shoot i carry out fox control on runs their year Feb to Feb, so far my tally is 113 the previous best year was 72 so well and truly beat that record.
Has anyone else had a bumper year?
 

Sika98k

Well-Known Member
Knocked 51 over on the 900 acres I look after. 5 more here and there. Shoot 2 dogs for every vixen.
22/250 is my choice of tool.
 

Cyres

Well-Known Member
There is so intresting info being posted, it does make you wonder what the UK fox population is.

considering the huge ammount of RTA's it would be intresting to get a handle on how many are being controlled. Clearly no figures from MFH association as foxs cannot be legally hunted !!!!!!!

However as fast as we seem to shoot them there are always some to move in. I supose having 2 free range chicken units helps.

Its also intresting to see who employs what methods. We rarely call and use a thermal to spot quarry, having been up with Paddy several times thats not possible in his area hence the reliance on calling.

We do seem to see alot on silage in the spring/ealy summer them seem to appear from nowhere, do they fingd the mown fields by sound or smell or both I wonder?

D
 

foxhunter

Well-Known Member
Just goes to show, for every fox you shoot seven come to his funeral ,
This is certainly not true in the North of England. We only shot 39 foxes last year and that is covering quite a lot of acreage. The fox population down South is a lot denser than ours that's for sure. Wish we had more foxes to go at. If we shoot a litter of foxes off a particular farm we don't get elopers moving in for a very long time , sometimes not til the next season. Envious of you guys with loads of foxes....
 

Taff

Well-Known Member
This is certainly not true in the North of England. We only shot 39 foxes last year and that is covering quite a lot of acreage. The fox population down South is a lot denser than ours that's for sure. Wish we had more foxes to go at. If we shoot a litter of foxes off a particular farm we don't get elopers moving in for a very long time , sometimes not til the next season. Envious of you guys with loads of foxes....
Amazing answer, the idea is to control the foxes you have at a sustainable level, not present moving targets for you to shoot at.
 

Paddy_SP

Well-Known Member
This is certainly not true in the North of England. We only shot 39 foxes last year and that is covering quite a lot of acreage. The fox population down South is a lot denser than ours that's for sure. Wish we had more foxes to go at. If we shoot a litter of foxes off a particular farm we don't get elopers moving in for a very long time , sometimes not til the next season. Envious of you guys with loads of foxes....
I don't think it's true here either - our 265 were shot on about 50,000 acres, and we're seeing very few anywhere now.

Amazing answer, the idea is to control the foxes you have at a sustainable level, not present moving targets for you to shoot at.
The problem is that if you are going out night after night and not seeing anything, it gets to be such a thankless task that it can be very hard to motivate yourself when the conditions are poor.
 

griffshrek

Well-Known Member
My numbers have been reasonably consistent over the past few yrs , ive not seen a drop in numbers in fact an increase but I put that down to the FP .

I shoot a variety of ground types from sheep hill farms , rural/urban land , chicken farm , big commercial farm , small farms. Biggest problem I have is local lampers having a go at the foxes them making them lamp shy and generally twitchy.
 

foxhunter

Well-Known Member
Amazing answer, the idea is to control the foxes you have at a sustainable level, not present moving targets for you to shoot at.
The foxes are controlled to a sustainable level but foxing is a fieldsport in its own right , a lot more challenging than stalking. Nothing wrong with wanting more quarry to hunt , benefiting all other wildlife into the bargain.
 

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