.223 or .204

.243Hunter

Well-Known Member
I'm after another rifle, I already have a .22hornet and .243. My license is due for renewal soon, torn between a .223 or .204 for dedicated NV fox rifle. Any help to make my mind up?
 

25 Sharps

Well-Known Member
I keep toying with the idea of swapping my 1:9 .223 for a .204 as I have a .22H and 6.5x55 either side of it, hornet does most of my foxing and swede my deer so the flatness of the .204 appeals to me for NV. But the bonus point of the .223 for me are it's small deer legal and mine will shoot 40, 55 and 69 gr bullets equally well which makes the .223 more versatile, a 40 gr out of a .223 isn't a million miles from a 40gr .204 trajectory wise. I had a rabbit at 230 yards under NV the other week with mine, point and shoot with a 200y zero. If you do reload there are many more choices of bullets in .223 and cases are plentiful and easy to get hold of.

But if it is purely for NV and you're likely to just want one load that works ( i shoot at bisley with the .223 too) then I'd choose the .204 I think, plus if you have a tricky firearms department the .204 is about the only CF that vermin is good reason to possess so it compliments your .22H and .243 for long range vermin.
 

247sniper

Well-Known Member
A .223 will spit out a 40 grain Vmax at around 3700ftps similar to and just like the 40 grain from the 204's. On paper there is a ballistic advantage favoring the .204 but unnoticeable during field conditions.
My .204 is super accurate (Just like many 223's) its is easy to reload for (Just like many 223's).

I like my 204 and I will never be without one. Do you intend to reload if you get one is a key factor as ammo supply is little and limited? You will find that most gun shops will stock a variety of 223 ammo, not like the 204.

If you are going to reload then great, brass seems plentyfull, I have loads if you get stuck, a choise of 32/40 grain Vmax or the 32/39 SBK's and then there is the 35/45 grain Berger bullets too.

Some thing to think about there mate, hope it helps?

Steve
 

Bigboab29

Well-Known Member
I have a 222 and 204, I like my 222 as it is deer legal for roe up in Scotland but for an out and out foxer with dedicated nv id got 204
 

bigoak

Well-Known Member
Whilst there is no doubt the 204 will shoot flatter, it just cant compete with the versatility of the 223 in my opinion. And just so you know, i was torn between the 2 when i was shooting hares for cash.
With a 40gn vmax and a gut load of Re7 it shoots flat enough for 200m head shots on hares. If you can shoot better than that consistantly good luck to you.
With a 55 gner im confident on and goat or small pig that comes my way.
Selection of projectiles is massive.
I have a hb sako snd a skinny ruger in 223. Theyre great. Snotted a couple of young fallow with the riger a few weeks back. Perfect.
 

ChesterP

Well-Known Member
Whilst there is no doubt the 204 will shoot flatter, it just cant compete with the versatility of the 223 in my opinion. And just so you know, i was torn between the 2 when i was shooting hares for cash.
With a 40gn vmax and a gut load of Re7 it shoots flat enough for 200m head shots on hares. If you can shoot better than that consistantly good luck to you.
With a 55 gner im confident on and goat or small pig that comes my way.
Selection of projectiles is massive.
I have a hb sako snd a skinny ruger in 223. Theyre great. Snotted a couple of young fallow with the riger a few weeks back. Perfect.
+1

Versatility and ease of ammo/cases would keep me with the 223. To 200 yards there's very little to choose between a 223 and 204 anyway. Both have negligible recoil, both have similar muzzle blast and can be well moderated, both will be super accurate with home loads to 200m. I personally make such decisions based on terminal ballistics required and distance/conditions that would most likely be shot. Beyond 200m, the 204 might be the better vermin control rifle but if most shots are taken within 200m, I'd suggest you just pick the one you want. The 22 Hornet might be made redundant by either the 223 or 204 unless you regularly shoot closer range for smaller vermin (the hornet's a nice little round as a small vermin control calibre).
 
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247sniper

Well-Known Member
Anyone shoot a fast twist .204 shooting 50/55 grain Berger bullets? Deer legal for certain species in certain places and perfect for varminting.
 

Bigboab29

Well-Known Member
does it not need to be a minimum of 22 calibre cf for small deer? ive got a fast 1:10 26 inch bergarra on my 204 and it stabalises the 45 hornadys no problems but ive never seen 50 or 55's, id love to give them a try though.
 

247sniper

Well-Known Member
does it not need to be a minimum of 22 calibre cf for small deer? ive got a fast 1:10 26 inch bergarra on my 204 and it stabalises the 45 hornadys no problems but ive never seen 50 or 55's, id love to give them a try though.

I doubt a 1:10 will stabilise the 50's certainly not the 55's as a 1:7 is recommended due to their length.

I don't shoot deer as there is none where I'm from but I thought it was minimum of 1000ftlb energy from a minimum of a 50 grain bullet or heavier.


Steve
 

25 Sharps

Well-Known Member
Anyone shoot a fast twist .204 shooting 50/55 grain Berger bullets? Deer legal for certain species in certain places and perfect for varminting.
Not anywhere in the uk as .22 is the minimum for the smaller size species plus I'm guessing you can only get varmint bullets which won't be ideal.
 

Cyres

Well-Known Member
I have both and lets say for the last 10 months the .223 has seen little use.

.204 is a fantastic round, flat, negible recoil and with 39 blitz king is absolutely lethal on all quarry. With correct moddy very quiet. Zero at 200 its only about 3" low at 300yds so in all intents and purposes just put in middle and shoot. Benifits from high mag scope with very fine illuminated reticule or for v serious fox control dedicated NV.

Mine is lightweight so very portable and just installs confidence as its so accurate. Very easy to reload esp at factory COL and cheap. Just a shame that not small deer legal.

D
 

ChesterP

Well-Known Member
I doubt a 1:10 will stabilise the 50's certainly not the 55's as a 1:7 is recommended due to their length.

I don't shoot deer as there is none where I'm from but I thought it was minimum of 1000ftlb energy from a minimum of a 50 grain bullet or heavier.


Steve

Deer Act:

Schedule 2: Prohibited calibres, England/Wales: All deer species: Anything below 0.24 inches, having a muzzle energy of less than 1700 ft-lbs. (0.236 inches and min bullet weight of 100 grains for N Ireland)

for Chinese Water Deer and Muntjac: Prohibited rifles: Anything having a calibre less than .220, a muzzle energy of less than 1000 ft-lbs and a weight of less than 50 grains (England, Wales & N Ireland).

Scotland is slightly different: For Roe, minimum requirement is a bullet weight of 50 grains with a min muzzle velocity of 2450 fps and a min muzzle energy of 1000 ft-lbs. For all deer species, min is bullet weight of at least 100 grains and a minimum MV of 2450 fps AND a min muzzle energy of 1750 ft-lbs. (ie a 100g bullet must have a MV of 2,808 fps).

There is no UK deer species that you can shoot with a .204
 

palo

Well-Known Member
I tried some berger 50 grain in my 1/10 twist 204 and they shot very well at 100 yards. I must try them again out a bit further .
I doubt a 1:10 will stabilise the 50's certainly not the 55's as a 1:7 is recommended due to their length.

I don't shoot deer as there is none where I'm from but I thought it was minimum of 1000ftlb energy from a minimum of a 50 grain bullet or heavier.


Steve
 

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