.22LR to clean or not?

The Talisman

Active Member
I have always been told not to clean my .22 LR unless accuracy drops off, & so far I have followed this advice & accuracy is not a problem. Its just if I look down the barrel & see the crud in there I cant help wondering how it stays accurate?

So the age old question, to clean or not?
 

Kjf

Well-Known Member
Please explain this "clean" concept. It is outwith my knowledge! :)

David.

Lol,

Tis a dark magical art, only known to those who wash and valet there shiny possesions each week...... And show everyone how shiny the things they got are....


But never actually use them lol lol, Just follow Paulo's advice and you'll be reet, and clean when it's required

Kjf
 

VSS

Well-Known Member
Accuracy on mine tends to drop off a bit after several hundred rounds. Then I just give it a pull through, and it's back on the mark after 5 shots or so. Other than that I don't clean the barrel at all, although I meticulously wipe over the outside, and woodwork, and make sure it's dry and up to room temp before storage.
Only time I had a worse issue was when the mod got full of crud, and accuracy went completely awol. Twice in the the last 8 - 9 years I've had to dismantle the mod and give it a good scrub to restore accuracy.
 

Heym SR20

Well-Known Member
I dont like leaving crud in a barrel. It attracts moisture which causes rust. My rifles are not used regularly so i always run a patch through with a drop or two of 303 or three min one oil before putting away. Has nt done any harm so far to my 22.
 

gonzo

Well-Known Member
My semi auto's tend to build up powder residue in the action. Which forms a grey paste with the oil and gums them up. Some are more affected than others for this, depending on the design. (Weight of the bolt/spring, affecting how much crap is still burning as the case extracts, and how tight the action is to get gumed up.)
I find that the bolt guns can get a build up of lead in the chamber, just before the rifling. This causes problems loading. A few licks with the wire brush usually shifts that.

Cleaning the bores on my 22's is less regularly done. A few times a year? Mainly because it is a pain to do, and they are used at least weekly.
I've not noticed accuracy issues. But I'm not shooting that seriously to notice.
 

Woodsmoke

Well-Known Member
I keep mine dry and wiped with an oily cloth. I'll use a boresnake through the barrel from time to time too, and open the mod' (SAK) to make sure it's not too full of crud when I remember. Apart from that, if it gets wet I dry it, if it gets muddy I wipe it :thumb:
 

Sonicdmb73

Well-Known Member
Only to prevent rust or powder crud build up in the action. The bore once in a blue moon. My bolt action is older than and still going strong.
Compared to my centre fire rifles which are cleaned every time I use them.
 

VSS

Well-Known Member
Only to prevent rust or powder crud build up in the action. The bore once in a blue moon. My bolt action is older than and still going strong.
Compared to my centre fire rifles which are cleaned every time I use them.
Just out of curiosity, why such a massive difference in cleaning regime between rimfire and centrefire? Is there any scientific or practical reasoning behind the discrepancy?
 

Ratsbadboy

Well-Known Member
I was always told it was because centrefire bullets are copper coated and the cleaning was to remove the copper buildup in the lands more than anything else.
 

VSS

Well-Known Member
I was always told it was because centrefire bullets are copper coated and the cleaning was to remove the copper buildup in the lands more than anything else.
I think that the CCI 22lr subs are also copper coated, aren't they? And 22lr rounds are always covered in waxy lube. Where does that go?
 

Ratsbadboy

Well-Known Member
I think that the CCI 22lr subs are also copper coated, aren't they? And 22lr rounds are always covered in waxy lube. Where does that go?
Not sure about CCI subs being copper coated. The only copper coated .22 ammo I've use has been CCI stinger. As regards the wax coating I can only assume it gets burnt off. I have heard the waxy coating can play havoc with semi autos though.
 

gonzo

Well-Known Member
The CCI coated bullets are just a thin film, rather than a thick copper jacket. And the bullets are pretty much pure lead, being pushed at pretty low velocities. So I doubt that copper fouling is going to be a factor, for 22rf.
I've never seen it on a 22RF.

The wax lube is going to be pushed out the barrel by the next bullet, and sprayed forwards. There will be some left in the barrel after each shot, but it should not build up.
 

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