. 22lr zero range

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Crowstalker

Well-Known Member
What is your zero range for your 22lr?

Mine is currently 100 yards, using eley hv but I'm thinking of changing it to 75 yards and sub sonic as the last time I zerod it I din't have the 17 so I had to push the wee 22 a bit further. Now as I have the 17hmr she can do the longer work.
 

Reloader708

Well-Known Member
50 yard then range finder and drop chart to 150 wind permitting... if needed.
Its a testament to how curved the .22lr trajectory is that from a 50 yard zero you need 5 clicks (.25" per 100yd) to hit centre at 60!
I run out of elevation beyond 150.
 

Brno2e

Well-Known Member
I bought a Hawke scope with the 22 sub reticle. You put them at max magnification and zero at 50 yards then use the relevant reticle for the distance required.
Its surprising how useful it is as long as I get my range estimation right.
 

Freeforester

Well-Known Member
I zero at 50 metres (55yards) with subsonic, check this zero against targets from 10 metres to 50, range and dial at ten metre intervals between 50 - 100 metres, noting all the while where the bullets land in relation to the aiming point (max variation in my setup is just under 3/4" at 30m), but beyond 80metres the groups do open up a bit much for consistent head shots in windier conditions, so I carry a couple clips of high velocity rounds; when my zero with subs is at 50 m, my zero with high velocity, by happy coincidence/chance is exactly 100 m, and very accurate indeed. Wind direction and strength make an increasingly significant impact on shot placement over greater distance, whereas bullet drop/gravity/trajectory is pretty much predictably constant once you know what your rifle does (mine is a 35yr old Brno 452 with 5 1/2" off the original length of the barrel, rethreaded). A sticker on the stock serves as an aide memoire as to the numbers, which over time I've memorised: range, dial, aim, squeeze, RETURN TO ZERO STOP.

Some Scopes have 60 adjustment clicks per revolution, like minutes on a clock, so marklines at 3, 6, and 9 o'clock on the turret give one a quick count of fifteen, thirty and forty five clicks, so eg if the rabbit is ranged at 82m away, I'll turn to 30 and then come back toward 27, but put back on a couple clicks from the 27 in view of the fact that it's a couple metres further than 80 metres, but still some way off 90 metres. More modern dialling Scopes with a ballistic- or diy turret ribbon would work very well used in similar manner, I'm sure, I just haven't gotten round to changing.

If/When shooting hv at 50m, my aim point is marked four dots down my scope reticle, but tbh if the rabbit is this close its unlikely that I have the hi speed rounds in use, it's just to let me know where I should aim should such a situation ever arise. So much detail not really used, but it's good to know nevertheless.

Zeroed at 50 m, I dial 7clicks up at 60m, 17 at 70m, 27 at 80m, 38 at 90m etc, and dial any inter-distance accordingly. This is all done from actually firing series of 5 to 6 x 5 shot groups on a calm day at the ranged and measured targets, to determine the trajectory of the actual bullet chosen from the actual rifle using and dialling the actual scope; I'm not ashamed to say that I've yet to get to rely on a ballistic calculator, I'd rather have the practice, and anyway it helps with both the (tuned) trigger let-off and justification for/use of ammunition in the calibre every renewal.

Getting to know your own setup well is, in my opinion very much worth the time spent, at least for me; I'm shooting bunnies for the human consumption market, so it's important that the body of the rabbit doesn't contain bullet fragments.

Gotta love yer .22lr! 👍🏻
 

Cottis

Well-Known Member
54yd zero gives me point and shoot out to 65yds. I hold manually out to 75-80yds to allow for that extra 1-1.5" drop from the 65yd point and beyond 80yds, I never use the .22LR. It is not the best tool in that situation in my opinion.
 

gixer1

Well-Known Member
54yd zero gives me point and shoot out to 65yds. I hold manually out to 75-80yds to allow for that extra 1-1.5" drop from the 65yd point and beyond 80yds, I never use the .22LR. It is not the best tool in that situation in my opinion.
I agree, I only group mine at 75 and 100 so if I needed a longer follow up shot I know where it shoots but to me the optimum range for a 22 shooting rabbits is 50-60 yards.

regards,
Gixer
 

Crowstalker

Well-Known Member
I zero at 50 metres (55yards) with subsonic, check this zero against targets from 10 metres to 50, range and dial at ten metre intervals between 50 - 100 metres, noting all the while where the bullets land in relation to the aiming point (max variation in my setup is just under 3/4" at 30m), but beyond 80metres the groups do open up a bit much for consistent head shots in windier conditions, so I carry a couple clips of high velocity rounds; when my zero with subs is at 50 m, my zero with high velocity, by happy coincidence/chance is exactly 100 m, and very accurate indeed. Wind direction and strength make an increasingly significant impact on shot placement over greater distance, whereas bullet drop/gravity/trajectory is pretty much predictably constant once you know what your rifle does (mine is a 35yr old Brno 452 with 5 1/2" off the original length of the barrel, rethreaded). A sticker on the stock serves as an aide memoire as to the numbers, which over time I've memorised: range, dial, aim, squeeze, RETURN TO ZERO STOP.

Some Scopes have 60 adjustment clicks per revolution, like minutes on a clock, so marklines at 3, 6, and 9 o'clock on the turret give one a quick count of fifteen, thirty and forty five clicks, so eg if the rabbit is ranged at 82m away, I'll turn to 30 and then come back toward 27, but put back on a couple clicks from the 27 in view of the fact that it's a couple metres further than 80 metres, but still some way off 90 metres. More modern dialling Scopes with a ballistic- or diy turret ribbon would work very well used in similar manner, I'm sure, I just haven't gotten round to changing.

If/When shooting hv at 50m, my aim point is marked four dots down my scope reticle, but tbh if the rabbit is this close its unlikely that I have the hi speed rounds in use, it's just to let me know where I should aim should such a situation ever arise. So much detail not really used, but it's good to know nevertheless.

Zeroed at 50 m, I dial 7clicks up at 60m, 17 at 70m, 27 at 80m, 38 at 90m etc, and dial any inter-distance accordingly. This is all done from actually firing series of 5 to 6 x 5 shot groups on a calm day at the ranged and measured targets, to determine the trajectory of the actual bullet chosen from the actual rifle using and dialling the actual scope; I'm not ashamed to say that I've yet to get to rely on a ballistic calculator, I'd rather have the practice, and anyway it helps with both the (tuned) trigger let-off and justification for/use of ammunition in the calibre every renewal.

Getting to know your own setup well is, in my opinion very much worth the time spent, at least for me; I'm shooting bunnies for the human consumption market, so it's important that the body of the rabbit doesn't contain bullet fragments.

Gotta love yer .22lr! 👍🏻


Wow you've really got your setup down to a t!!
 
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