.243 barrell life

AndyTheSilent

Well-Known Member
Assuming my variation ever comes through (82 days now with D&C) ill be getting a Tikka T3X. I'm currently only looking at getting it new however if I went down the second hand route, what is the barrell life of a .243 assuming it's been used for stalking (I.e. not a range gun, so no long shot strings). I'd be buying from an rfd so should I expect them to be honest with the internal barrell condition and if not is there anything I can do to see it's condition (apart from buying a bore scope and understanding what I see)
Cheers
 

Dawnrazor

Well-Known Member
Had about 4000 through the first barrel on my .243 with virtually no cleaning, ok, "virtually" is streaching it, absolutely no cleaning, I never even owned a cleaning rod untill I got the new barrel.
It's a Remington 700 and the first barrel was the thin sporter that came on the BDL European in 1990.
 

caberslash

Well-Known Member
I'd be more worried about barrel corrosion from moderators being left on. 'Barrel life' is talked about to much when many other things can be wrong!

The T3x has not been out that long, so secondhand prices may be higher. A wood/laminate and blued T3 won't be any less of a rifle than a 'stainless' T3x.

The only way to gut check someone selling a rifle is with your own experience and knowledge, answers on online forum won't give you much of that.

Saying that, a few T3/T3x specific things to check, although it's unlikely an RFD is going to dissasemble the rifle there and then, much less let you do it.

1. Bolt shroud, if the spring underneath it is missing.

2. Plastic triggerguard, is it cracked?

3. Trigger, has someone adjusted it? (should be some form of sealant/blue Loctite on the weight of pull screws)

4. Recoil lug (aluminum on t3 and 'steel' on the T3x), check for gouges.

5. Crown, all T3x will be factory threaded but still worth checking. If you see rust caked on in between the threads, run for the hills!
 

NullMac

Well-Known Member
I'd be buying from an rfd so should I expect them to be honest with the internal barrel condition
Don't. Unless they are a 'smith or maybe a keen target shooter they may have no more clue than you or I. There are RFDs and RFDs.

If it is a 243, it is unlikely (but not impossible) to have been hammered on the range. Stalkers tend not to shoot enough rather than too much, so if you buy a the latest model secondhand that is obviously in good condition otherwise (stock marks, marks on the barrel etc) then chances are the barrel will be fine. A cabinet queen will be fairly obvious compared to a workhorse.

It is always a risk though.
 

palo

Well-Known Member
You said you were looking at buying new so you should go ahead.
Why take the risk of buying 2nd hand if you have the cash for a new one.
 

caberslash

Well-Known Member
I thought D&C police were a lot quicker than that of late?

Regarding 2nd hand, take a look at this Sako 75 HUNTER [ WARNING ] .243 Rifle | Second Hand Guns for Sale | guntrader
A good reason why not to buy 2nd hand, but I would take a serious look at the above rifle, haggle, and look into getting a new barrel.
The Sako 75 is a cracking rifle.
Cheers
Richard

Wonder who the 'reputable dealer' was?

Sorry to disagree but buying a rifle with scrap barrel to put a new one on does not make any economic sense in the UK.

You don't need a Bartlien/Krieger barrel for UK deer stalking. Better to save money and buy new instead of dropping around a grand for a new tube.
 

bogtrotter

Well-Known Member
Barrel life is a strange thing, I have heard talk of 11 seconds for .243 that is 11 seconds that a bullet has actually spent
In the barrel how many bullets is that? I have no idea! Nor do I have the inclination to work it out don't even know if that
statement is true.
What I do know is that hot loads and long shot strings will wear a barrel quicker than mild loads and less frequent shots
will.?
Cleaning regime may also play a part but the jury is out on that one some clean everytime the rifle is fired some clean
less frequently some next to never and there does not seem to bea pattern.
I have a forty year old Sako in .243 with an astronomical round count and I mean astronomical this is no cabinet
Queen used by myself in my job as a stalker and also used by clients as it also served as the " estate rifle" cleaned now
and again always dried and the outside wiped over with an oily rag before being put away the barrel would be cleaned if
I got water in it that didn't happen often as I still practice the old habit of covering the end of the barrel with insulting
sorry insulating tape and if and whenever accuracy started to fall off and at the end of the season and that is about it.
The reasons for the barrel longevity maybe and I have no scientific proof for this 1 it is a stalking rifle so no long shot
strings the most it would ever fire fairly rapid was five at a group of hinds and even that was not so very frequent a coup!e of shots at a time more often than not.
2 It has never really fired hot loads factory loads for the first couple of years I had it and for the last thirty odd I have
been home loading a mid range load halfway between a min and max load for no other reason than I found that to be the
most accurate round in this rifle.
3 it is a working rifle it was used frequently it did not spend weeks or months in the cabinet like many recreational
stalkers rifles .So not sat for long periods with a dirty barrel which may or may not explain why my somewhat lax
cleaning regime has not had an adverse effect on my barrel.
Sorry doesn't answer the OP question on barrel life and I don't have the answer he is looking for but what I have written
may go some way to showing there are too many variables for a straight forward answer.
 

Conh

Well-Known Member
Barrel life is a strange thing, I have heard talk of 11 seconds for .243 that is 11 seconds that a bullet has actually spent
In the barrel how many bullets is that? I have no idea! Nor do I have the inclination to work it out don't even know if that
statement is true.
What I do know is that hot loads and long shot strings will wear a barrel quicker than mild loads and less frequent shots
will.?
Cleaning regime may also play a part but the jury is out on that one some clean everytime the rifle is fired some clean
less frequently some next to never and there does not seem to bea pattern.
I have a forty year old Sako in .243 with an astronomical round count and I mean astronomical this is no cabinet
Queen used by myself in my job as a stalker and also used by clients as it also served as the " estate rifle" cleaned now
and again always dried and the outside wiped over with an oily rag before being put away the barrel would be cleaned if
I got water in it that didn't happen often as I still practice the old habit of covering the end of the barrel with insulting
sorry insulating tape and if and whenever accuracy started to fall off and at the end of the season and that is about it.
The reasons for the barrel longevity maybe and I have no scientific proof for this 1 it is a stalking rifle so no long shot
strings the most it would ever fire fairly rapid was five at a group of hinds and even that was not so very frequent a coup!e of shots at a time more often than not.
2 It has never really fired hot loads factory loads for the first couple of years I had it and for the last thirty odd I have
been home loading a mid range load halfway between a min and max load for no other reason than I found that to be the
most accurate round in this rifle.
3 it is a working rifle it was used frequently it did not spend weeks or months in the cabinet like many recreational
stalkers rifles .So not sat for long periods with a dirty barrel which may or may not explain why my somewhat lax
cleaning regime has not had an adverse effect on my barrel.
Sorry doesn't answer the OP question on barrel life and I don't have the answer he is looking for but what I have written
may go some way to showing there are too many variables for a straight forward answer.
Purely out of interest, what size groups does this rifle currently shoot when you check zero etc. At 100 yards
 

JockStalk

Well-Known Member
In D&C I’d suggest maybe asking on here for recommended dealers if new or used. Would definitely recommend Edinburgh Rifles and Hunters Cabin as being very straight, if they say it’s good you can rely on that. Then it’s just the transfer fee to any local RFD to receive for you. Second hand makes plenty sense and loads of 243 about.
 

Cranborne

Well-Known Member
It would be worthwhile speaking to Steve Beatty at Ivythorn Sporting near Street. He has a good range of new and used rifles, and will give you an honest appraisal of condition. He also has an onsite range, so you can try before deciding to purchase.
 

Sinistral

Well-Known Member
Assuming my variation ever comes through (82 days now with D&C) ill be getting a Tikka T3X. I'm currently only looking at getting it new however if I went down the second hand route, what is the barrell life of a .243 assuming it's been used for stalking (I.e. not a range gun, so no long shot strings). I'd be buying from an rfd so should I expect them to be honest with the internal barrell condition and if not is there anything I can do to see it's condition (apart from buying a bore scope and understanding what I see)
Cheers
There are other useful threads on this with the same title if you follow the link.
These have come up after a search, maybe your spelling didn't work.:)

 

AndyTheSilent

Well-Known Member
In D&C I’d suggest maybe asking on here for recommended dealers if new or used. Would definitely recommend Edinburgh Rifles and Hunters Cabin as being very straight, if they say it’s good you can rely on that. Then it’s just the transfer fee to any local RFD to receive for you. Second hand makes plenty sense and loads of 243 about.
My local ones are ladds and blue fox glade and I've purchased second hand shotguns from both of these in the past with no issues. I'm going to trade one if my shotguns in to help fund this purchase so that restricts buying from RFD further afield
 
Wonder who the 'reputable dealer' was?

Sorry to disagree but buying a rifle with scrap barrel to put a new one on does not make any economic sense in the UK.

You don't need a Bartlien/Krieger barrel for UK deer stalking. Better to save money and buy new instead of dropping around a grand for a new tube.
Yes I am biased, one of the best actions out there is the Sako 75, I have one, a Stainless Synthetic in .243, not sure I would shell out a grand if it wore out (had it over 25 years) but I didn't realise it cost that much these days.
Cheers
Richard
 

baguio

Well-Known Member
You should have loads of second hand models to choose from as people sell their's to get something more suitable calibres for tomorrow's stalking. Plenty will have done very little work at all.
 
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Overlay

Well-Known Member
if you are looking for a rifle to keep long term buy new from a reputable source / company it cuts out any problems, unless you know the person your buying off and the true history of the rifle you need to be very careful
good luck and hopefully buy well
 

old keeper

Well-Known Member
It would be worthwhile speaking to Steve Beatty at Ivythorn Sporting near Street. He has a good range of new and used rifles, and will give you an honest appraisal of condition. He also has an onsite range, so you can try before deciding to purchase.
Another one for Steve Beaty at Ivythorn in Somerset. A genuine, straight-talking dealer who knows his stuff. His take on pitted barrels and moserators is well known and it is really amazing just how many barrels do turn out to have pits
 
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