243 Rifle Options?

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Adam f

Well-Known Member
Just swapped out my 22.250 for a 243 to enable me to be deer legal.

But what rifle to go for? I want to buy once and buy right, but saying that I dont have an endless budget. Ive just picked up a Zeiss Duralyt to pop on the top.

Currently looking at Tikka T3 vs Howa 1500. Stuck between the practicality of a synthetic stock and a pretty grey laminated stock. Set on a stainless action and barrell.

Now a few people have thrown the M595 into the mix! Dont know much about them - did prefer a newer gun, but people seem to highly rate the M595 action? How easy is an aftermarket laminated stock for one of these if I go that way?

Adam
 

Jager SA

Well-Known Member
595 gets my vote every time, had 4 over the years and just rebarreled one in 243 with a nice heavy sporter barrel. Check out Boyds or try one of the home grown laminate stock makers here.
 

Adam f

Well-Known Member
Thats what I keep hearing about the M595 - havent seen a bad word on them yet!

I'll need to see one in the flesh - so forgive my ignorance, but why are they so good, and better over a T3?
 

Jager SA

Well-Known Member
Thats what I keep hearing about the M595 - havent seen a bad word on them yet!

I'll need to see one in the flesh - so forgive my ignorance, but why are they so good, and better over a T3?

The 595 was a workhorse, a little less finesse than the Sako but just as accurate and considerably less expensive. Then came alone the T3 which are all based on long actions and in my opinion made to a budget, however they do shoot. I like many prefer the 595 over the T3 and the same for the Sako 75 over the 85. It would appear as always that the accountants are in charge of building rifles, anything to cut costs I guess.
 

Brithunter

Well-Known Member
IMHO ..The best thing to do is do a bit of travelling and visit a few gunshops. Handle their rifles and find one that really feels "right" then if it's not in the right chambering look for a rifle of that make and model that is in .243.

Keep an open mind when doing so and see where it leads you.
 

palmer_mike

Well-Known Member
Like you I was initially keen on a new rifle (at least you know its history and its unlikely to have problems that might occur due to misuse/overuse),
but when i went looking at the rfd I fell in love with a Sako 75. Lovely looking rifle, only problem was the rifle had various deep seated issues that only cropped up after trying to get it zero'd etc.
Went back to shop for a refund and got a new t3. Wish I had done that to begin with as its a fantastically accurate rifle and a pleasure to shoot!
 

Jager SA

Well-Known Member
Like you I was initially keen on a new rifle (at least you know its history and its unlikely to have problems that might occur due to misuse/overuse), but when i went looking at the rfd I fell in love with a Sako 75. Lovely looking rifle, only problem was the rifle had various deep seated issues that only cropped up after trying to get it zero'd etc. Went back to shop for a refund and got a new t3. Wish I had done that to begin with as its a fantastically accurate rifle and a pleasure to shoot!

"Various deep seated issues" Sounds a bit suspect, what did you encounter?
 

palmer_mike

Well-Known Member
"Various deep seated issues" Sounds a bit suspect, what did you encounter?

POI kept changing after zeroing. Normal check all screws etc tight then zero (which produced very nice groups!)
After another 6 or so shots the groups wouls spread alarmingly. We eventually realised that the action was now moving in the stock so much that the barrel was touching the channel. Tightened up the action screws again and the problem repeated after half a dozen or so shots.

Took rifle back to shop and was told that they wanted to locktight the screws to fix the problem (i wasn't happy with this as a solution), they then agreed to send the rifle to a smith to check it over.

It returned a few days later with a note that he had taken the action out of the stock checked it all out re-assembled it and fired test group which showed there was no problem.

I was happy at this point but a but puzzled, so took the rifle away again. Got to a range a couple of days later and suprise suprise the same thing happened again.

This proble was witnessed by two experienced stalkers who are on this site (i wont name them as i havent asked their permission).

I then took the rifle back and got a refund (i was supprised that the shop were good enough to replace the used ammo as well).

I heard later from some one else that they had seen the rifle for sale again in the shop after i had taken it back (maybe the problem had been fixed - maybe the action screws had just been nipped up a bit, who can say).
 

Mungo

Well-Known Member
T3 is an extremely good rifle for the price. Yes, it's made to a budget, and isn't the prettiest one out there. And it does suffer because they've generalised so many parts over so many calibres (so the .222 is the same weight and action length as the .308).

But it's as accurate as most of us are ever likely to need, it has a very smooth bolt (far more so than many premium rifles I've tried), and it inspires confidence.

It is very much the unglamorous Ford Focus of rifles, and I'm very happy indeed with mine.
 

Adam f

Well-Known Member
Like the car anology!

So just out of interest, if the T3 is the Focus of rifles, what would the BMW, Merceades, Audi etc be?
 

Mungo

Well-Known Member
Like the car anology!

So just out of interest, if the T3 is the Focus of rifles, what would the BMW, Merceades, Audi etc be?

Unfortunately, I don't know enough about the differences between expensive cars to be able to really narrow it down, but...

Given that Sako and Tikka are made by the same people, then perhaps the T3 is the Focus, while a Sako 85 is the Mondeo.

Howa might be the equivalent of a reliable mid price Japanese car - Toyota Yaris, perhaps.

CZ would be the ex-eastern bloc manufacturer who now turns out very decent cars for the price - like Skoda (who themselves were an arms manufacturer).

Steyr Mannlicher might be thought of as the Audi/Merc/BMW.

Blaser/Sauer might be thought of as the Jaguar/Aston Martin.

Others could add to this or modify - I think it might be a revealing excercise!
 
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Border

Well-Known Member
Unfortunately, I don't know enough about the differences between expensive cars to be able to really narrow it down, but...

Given that Sako and Tikka are made by the same people, then perhaps the T3 is the Focus, while a Sako 85 is the Mondeo.

Howa might be the equivalent of a reliable mid price Japanese car - Toyota Yaris, perhaps.

CZ would be the ex-eastern bloc manufacturer who now turns out very decent cars for the price - like Skoda (who themselves were an arms manufacturer).

Steyr Mannlicher might be thought of as the Audi/Merc/BMW.

Blaser/Sauer might be thought of as the Jaguar/Aston Martin.

Others could add to this or modify - I think it might be a revealing excercise!

I think that the man licker is more a Saab, definitely a "style" of it's own.
The Rem 700 must be the ford Escort for all the accessories available.
 

Mungo

Well-Known Member
The Rem 700 must be the ford Escort for all the accessories available.

I thought about that, but like a lot of American domestic cars, it's really not very good *until* it's been heavily modified. Maybe a Jeep Wrangler: pretty dismal as an off road vehicle off the shelf, but wonderful after £20 grand's worth of souped up suspension, custom roll bars, new gear box and transmission etc etc...
 

AdrianC

Well-Known Member
IMHO ..The best thing to do is do a bit of travelling and visit a few gunshops. Handle their rifles and find one that really feels "right" then if it's not in the right chambering look for a rifle of that make and model that is in .243.

Keep an open mind when doing so and see where it leads you.

As above.

Asking the question you have will let members tell you what they think you should buy and what their favourite rifle is. You have decided the calibre, now you have to decide the package around the barrel.
Don't go buying a particular rifle or make/brand etc just because everyone tells you how good they are and they have one so should you. Take the suggestions but there is no point going out and buying a Tikka or Sako if you're uncomfortable holding it or it doesn't fit you.
Find the rifle that fits you and you alone. Find a rifle that you will enjoy going shooting with. It's your companion so choose what you like, don't be led by popular brand culture, peer pressure or fashion.

I went to the guns shops dead set on a Sako. I mean, everyone else has one, they're popular tried and tested but when I picked one up, put it to my shoulder I knew it wasn't right for me. It felt uncomfortable so I chose another rifle that came to my shoulder and cheek perfectly, my eye was in the right place first time, it felt good and gives me confidence when I take it stalking.
 

Dragunov

Well-Known Member
As above.

Asking the question you have will let members tell you what they think you should buy and what their favourite rifle is. You have decided the calibre, now you have to decide the package around the barrel.
Don't go buying a particular rifle or make/brand etc just because everyone tells you how good they are and they have one so should you. Take the suggestions but there is no point going out and buying a Tikka or Sako if you're uncomfortable holding it or it doesn't fit you.
Find the rifle that fits you and you alone. Find a rifle that you will enjoy going shooting with. It's your companion so choose what you like, don't be led by popular brand culture, peer pressure or fashion.

I went to the guns shops dead set on a Sako. I mean, everyone else has one, they're popular tried and tested but when I picked one up, put it to my shoulder I knew it wasn't right for me. It felt uncomfortable so I chose another rifle that came to my shoulder and cheek perfectly, my eye was in the right place first time, it felt good and gives me confidence when I take it stalking.

+1 on the above
 
If you are coming up to the Midland gamefair, we will have on the stand, tikka T3, Tikka 595, Styers, Sakos, remmys and more all in our own laminate stocks, you are welcome to have a look at all the actions as well as the stocks if you want, By the way a good secondhand Sako in the right stock would be a very good choice, never confuse Sako quality with Tikka Quality you only need to look at the amount of plastic on them. It would appear the isusses you had with the Sako is a stocking one and would be easily fixed. Please let me know where you bought it from I think a cheap Sako maybe there to be had.
 

Axe

Well-Known Member
Agree with Mungo - T3 is a very solid reliable and well priced rifle. I have one and am very happy with it and i take its been a real reliable workhorse for me. Not my favourite rifle but my go to rifle in poor weather or for abuse work. If I was on a budget and had to buy one rifle then the T3 would be my choice.
 

Brithunter

Well-Known Member
Unfortunately, I don't know enough about the differences between expensive cars to be able to really narrow it down, but...

Given that Sako and Tikka are made by the same people, then perhaps the T3 is the Focus, while a Sako 85 is the Mondeo.

Howa might be the equivalent of a reliable mid price Japanese car - Toyota Yaris, perhaps.

CZ would be the ex-eastern bloc manufacturer who now turns out very decent cars for the price - like Skoda (who themselves were an arms manufacturer).

Steyr Mannlicher might be thought of as the Audi/Merc/BMW.

Blaser/Sauer might be thought of as the Jaguar/Aston Martin.

Others could add to this or modify - I think it might be a revealing excercise!

Interesting .......................... and sadly the comparison with cars is becoming all too true. After all Ford own lots of other brands and today we have Capital venture companies buying, gathering gun makers under one "banner" and ruining them.

​Skoda as mentioned is a very old firm and was like BSA and Husqvarna in that they made a huge range of stuff from arms to machine tools. I believe it was only the car division sold off to VAG.

One thing I am always thankful for was that I belonged to an active Rifle & Pistol club which had a fair number of members and they had quite a wide range of rifle makes and models and often it was possible to try them out on the range and so I was able to sort those which I felt comfortable with and liked and those which were not worth the time bothering with for me.

.
 
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