.270 heavy bullets or not

bradstalk

Well-Known Member
Iv recently changed rifle to a .270 and am using 150 grain round nose bullets. Granted Iv only shot around 10 fallow with it but all of which are running anywhere between 50-200 yards which is a pain! All have been good heart and lung shot placement when gralloched, would anyone recommend a lighter round for better expansion? Or different shot placement? Cheers :)
 

Southern

Well-Known Member
Are you shooting the Remington 150-gr RN? That is a good shooting round out of most .270s, but it is a pretty tough bullet, expands, but holds together well. It works well on bears, elk, wild boar, things like that. There was a professional gamekeeper in England with whom I used to correspond, who used them a lot in Africa and for moose and boar in Europe, but he used the Hornady spire point 150-gr for all his deer, and had only needed to shot one of them twice. The was a 150-gr believer.

Unless you are too close ( and get a lot of meat damage), the 130-gr is meat-and-potatoes for deer. I shoot some 140-gr Hornadys in my .270s, too, as they are very accurate and do well at 200 and 250 yards on the 150-lb whitetail deer I see.
 

Deanandrew64

Well-Known Member
130 gr barnes tsx, fast and flat shooting with great knock down power either home loaded with H 4350 or try a box of sako powerhead factory with the tsx tips:thumb:
 

bradstalk

Well-Known Member
Are you shooting the Remington 150-gr RN? That is a good shooting round out of most .270s, but it is a pretty tough bullet, expands, but holds together well. It works well on bears, elk, wild boar, things like that. There was a professional gamekeeper in England with whom I used to correspond, who used them a lot in Africa and for moose and boar in Europe, but he used the Hornady spire point 150-gr for all his deer, and had only needed to shot one of them twice. The was a 150-gr believer.

Unless you are too close ( and get a lot of meat damage), the 130-gr is meat-and-potatoes for deer. I shoot some 140-gr Hornadys in my .270s, too, as they are very accurate and do well at 200 and 250 yards on the 150-lb whitetail deer I see.
hi, no I'm using federal classics, thanks il drop it down to the 130/140 and hopefully get some better results, cheers
 

Gaz

Well-Known Member
Been using 130gn SP Norma for all uk deer in my .270 for years with no problems. Did try some 150gn once but couldn't get any acceptable grouping which is a different matter.
 

Eric the Red

Well-Known Member
I'm not sure weight of the bullet is the issue. I have shot many deer of all species with 150 gr and had little issue with runners. On shot placement, if you're hitting heart/lung, there's no better place, so keep doing it.
I suspect as others do you're perhaps not getting the expansion from the particular bullet brand. I've recently shot a batch of 140 gr BT's - they do fine, but not my preference as they can be too explosive. soft nose should be fine.

you say nothing of the deer behaviour prior to shot - are they revved up at all? If they are aware and the adrenaline is running, this may have some bearing too. Not all deer drop to the shot - persevere - it sounds like you're doing the right things.
 

8x57

Distinguished Member
I shot a .270 for years and never had any problems with 150 grn bullets in fact I prefered 150 grn to the norm of 130 grn. Like others have said I would wonder about the suitability of the bullet and load that you are using rather than just think about the weight. Incidentally most of the bullets that I used in the .270 were Speer soft points which were possibly the cheapest that you could buy at the time.
 

bewsher500

Well-Known Member
Absolutely no physical benefit in using 150gr in the .270 IMO

130gr driven at factory speeds beats it hands down on energy, velocity and drop right out to 300yds

But I would agree that your issue is poor bullet construction rather than weight

Speer, Hornady, Norma, Scierra all make decent soft point copper jacketed, cup and core bullets.

I personally don't like ballistic tips (for deer) on relatively fast (3000+fps MV) as they can be messy.
HV tried SST's in 130gr and despite the fact that a straight swap over the same charge is more accurate I won't use them on deer.

my deer are eaten or go to the game dealer for max price
blown shoulders or inner loins cost money
 

sikamalc

Administrator
Site Staff
I have shot a 270 for over 30 years and have never had an issue using 150grain bullets. I load my own, and have done for many years, using Sierra boat tail soft nose in both 130g and 150g. At the moment I have loaded 150g and this past weekend had a novice stalker using my rifle and it took a Fallow down on the spot.

Fallow at this time of year are very jumpy and have been hunted for a long time, most will run a short distance, unless neck or head shot, or you break their spine.
 

bradstalk

Well-Known Member
I'm not sure weight of the bullet is the issue. I have shot many deer of all species with 150 gr and had little issue with runners. On shot placement, if you're hitting heart/lung, there's no better place, so keep doing it.
I suspect as others do you're perhaps not getting the expansion from the particular bullet brand. I've recently shot a batch of 140 gr BT's - they do fine, but not my preference as they can be too explosive. soft nose should be fine.

you say nothing of the deer behaviour prior to shot - are they revved up at all? If they are aware and the adrenaline is running, this may have some bearing too. Not all deer drop to the shot - persevere - it sounds like you're doing the right things.
There's only been a couple that have been aware of me and oddly they haven't been the longest runners! Most of my shooting is from high seat and they don't seem revved up at all, one of the longest runners was a yearling buck and it ran about 120 yards and when gralloched the top of the heart and lungs was destroyed!
 

Eric the Red

Well-Known Member
There's only been a couple that have been aware of me and oddly they haven't been the longest runners! Most of my shooting is from high seat and they don't seem revved up at all, one of the longest runners was a yearling buck and it ran about 120 yards and when gralloched the top of the heart and lungs was destroyed!
Seems consistent. Top of the area suggests the majority still intact and so it bled out - being young and full of joie de vivre, it made a few yards in flight.

Another consideration here is range - too close can have an impact on bullet expansion in the same way further can. Still think it's bullet make up......
 

sean

Well-Known Member
I shoot 154gr RWS evo ammo at the moment. Very minimal meat damage and i have had no issues with deer running any amount of distance. I used to load 130gr and 150gr Sierra pro hunters there a good well made bullet at sensible money. Ballistic tips in a .270 personally i don't like them, Sure they drop things fast but the game dealer sulks like hell.
Regards Sean
 

bewsher500

Well-Known Member
Seems consistent. Top of the area suggests the majority still intact and so it bled out - being young and full of joie de vivre, it made a few yards in flight.

Another consideration here is range - too close can have an impact on bullet expansion in the same way further can. Still think it's bullet make up......
I have shot red stags at 40yds and 220yds with 130gr
you are correct in your comment about construction

I have never had an "over penetration" due to distance near or far

This is is a 130gr hornady interlock, recovered from the offside under the skin of a stag shot at 40yds
fully expanded.

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paultap

Well-Known Member
I have recently started reloading for my tikka t3 in 270, I am using a Hornady 2735 140 Grn soft point interlock bullet . To date I have only shot 4 Roe deer with it but all 4 have dropped on the spot at a distance of about 190 - 210 yards.
 

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