.270 zeroing - What range is best?

FrenchieBoy

Well-Known Member
I have had to go back to PPU 130g SP Ammunition in my .270 after running very low on the Norma SP 130g ammunition that I was using.
I tried using a box of S&B Barnes XLC in 130g but my rifle just would not handle them - They went all over the place, totally useless through my barrel!
I usually zero at 100 yards but on Sunday (After buying the PPU ammunition) I decided to zero the 270 with the 130g PPU at 150 reasonable sized paces, with a fair degree of accuracy as the attached target shows, which I am happy with. (It is a Birchwood Casey Shoot-N-See target with a 15mm red centre spot with just the 2 rounds put at it to confirm that I had the zeroing correct and was shot off the bonnet of my car using a bipod)
My normal shooting (When out in "general field conditions") can be anywhere between 75 yards and maybe 250 yards (Maximum - I prefer not to push the range beyond 250 yards because of the potential risks associated with "shooter error" and leaving wounded quarry) so I am trying to find the best distance to zero at to "minimise" the need for hold over/under to cover these sort of ranges that I am normally shooting at.
With so many different opinions about the range you ought to zero your rifle at what would your thoughts be please Guys - i.e. Would I be best to stick with this "setting" or try zeroing at a differnt distance?
270@150yds.jpg
 
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Southern

Well-Known Member
Without knowing what kind of game you are hunting, expected size, typical range, and your self-imposed limit of max range, whether you use a rangefinder, etc...

I would say, "Why zero a .270 for less than 200 yards?"
That lets you be no more than 1.5 inches high or low out to about 240 yards, with standard 130-gr rounds.

But check your PPU, and shoot some other brands.
I have been checking various ammuntion, store brands and handloads, in my SteyrMannlicher carbine and a friend's Merkel K1 Stutzen, both with 20-inch barrels. Some of my handloads are over 3,050 FPS, some store ammunition is at 2,950, and the PPU 130-gr ammo was at 2,800 FPS. 300 fps will make a significant difference in drop at 300 yards and further.
 

rem284

Well-Known Member
I zero mine at 180m. I check my sights at 100m and the point of impact will be 1.25" high. so any thing up to 200m you dont have to think about hold over. 250m place the cross hair 3/4 way up on the chest. 275 to 300m give it 2moa on turret or reticule
 

bewsher500

Well-Known Member
2" high @100yrs =200yd zero and approx 10" drop @ 300yd

you sure about those numbers?
factory MV is 3100 or there abouts.

2" high at 100 gives a zero at 235 yds or thereabouts
that's less that 5"give or take at 300


I tend to stick to the 1", 0 and 6-7" guideline for .270
most other calibres/cartridges are closer to 2", 0, 8-10" though


can't think of a single shot at deer I have taken with the .270 that required a recalculation other than maybe for a slight hold into the howling gale
 

jcampbellsmith

Well-Known Member
I zero mine at 180m. I check my sights at 100m and the point of impact will be 1.25" high. so any thing up to 200m you dont have to think about hold over. 250m place the cross hair 3/4 way up on the chest. 275 to 300m give it 2moa on turret or reticule
I'm puzzled. How do you manage to work with 3 different units of measure? Regards JCS
 

FrenchieBoy

Well-Known Member
Without knowing what kind of game you are hunting, expected size, typical range, and your self-imposed limit of max range, whether you use a rangefinder, etc...

I would say, "Why zero a .270 for less than 200 yards?"
That lets you be no more than 1.5 inches high or low out to about 240 yards, with standard 130-gr rounds.

But check your PPU, and shoot some other brands.
I have been checking various ammuntion, store brands and handloads, in my SteyrMannlicher carbine and a friend's Merkel K1 Stutzen, both with 20-inch barrels. Some of my handloads are over 3,050 FPS, some store ammunition is at 2,950, and the PPU 130-gr ammo was at 2,800 FPS. 300 fps will make a significant difference in drop at 300 yards and further.
I sould have mentioned that my main quarry is fox and deer - Mainly roe while out stalking but all other types of "native species of deer" (Reds, Fallow, Sika etc) while out culling!
I believe that I stated in my original post (but just in case I didn't) I have a self imposed limit of 250 yards maximum as it is a valid point!
On the face of what you have all said it looks as if it may be better to re-zero at 200 yards.

Thanks for your input guys!
 

paul o'

Well-Known Member
Whats best for you pin on or hold over your choice mine are pin on at 100 but have swaro bt so no guessing.
 

badbob

Well-Known Member
I think your target at 150 yards is just fine,
most of us are limited to a 100yards for zeroing so
we guestimate what happens at 150yards.
so we allow 0, 1, 2, or 3 inches high at 100 depending
on your fancy
however if you are shooting foxes and roe you dont reallywant
your bullet going 3 to 5 inches high at mid range, they are not that big a target.
you want your bullet within an inch of where you are aiming for all normal ranges.
 

Woodsmoke

Well-Known Member
This is an interesting article discussing the merits of a 100 yard zero against a MPBR zero

http://www.rmvh.com/MPBR.htm

Up until I recently, most of my shots would be well within 200 yards, but I recently gained the opportunities to shoot on moorland and forestry up by Stonehaven & the chances of rangier shots may well increase. I reckon the MPBR zero might well make more sense for longer shots as it eliminates the need for multiple range estimation & holdovers
 

Southern

Well-Known Member
The problem with the MPBR zero is that it is dependent on the diameter of the target. A larger diameter extends the MPBR. Most calculation use 6 inch diameter or larger.

But if shooting smaller game, like fox, coyote, or roe deer, the heart sized "bullseye" is smaller, and you must allow for your guessing, angles, movement, etc.

With a ..270, an inch high or 1.5 high at 100 stays inside a 3 inch circle out past 200 yards - no figuring, no holdover, no knob twisting.
 

tackb

Well-Known Member
you sure about those numbers?
factory MV is 3100 or there abouts.

2" high at 100 gives a zero at 235 yds or thereabouts
that's less that 5"give or take at 300


I tend to stick to the 1", 0 and 6-7" guideline for .270
most other calibres/cartridges are closer to 2", 0, 8-10" though


can't think of a single shot at deer I have taken with the .270 that required a recalculation other than maybe for a slight hold into the howling gale
2-0-9 at the risk of sounding like a stuck record.........

130g sp (I used PPU data) 3060 fps

1.92'' @ 100m 0'' @ 200m -8.64'' @ 300m certainly all kill shots using the 2-0-9 guide ! at 3100fps it changes to 1.85'' 0 -8.39'' not worth worrying about really?
 

Monkey Spanker

Well-Known Member
I think it depends at what range you shoot most deer at. It astounds me sometimes that people have their rifle set (not zeroed!) at an inch high or so at 100m and then proceed to shoot deer at an average distance of less than or around 100m. You effectively shoot most of your deer with an unzeroed rifle! I much prefer to zero bang on at 100m which is a good average shot range. If it is further or less range then I adjust my point of aim accordingly. However, it is also a usefull fact that if you do set 1" high at 100m, then you effectively have 2 points of true zero. The first will be somewhere around 50-70m where the bullet passes up through the line of sight and the second at around 150m where the bullet drops back down through the line of sight. Knowing this first and closest point can be very useful! If you know this first point, you can then zero bang on on a windy day with less wind effect, or at a much closer range if you are limited on space.
MS
 

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