3 inch high zero

Danny rem mag

Well-Known Member
Hi chaps. Off back up to Sutherland on the 4th to see what the keeper wants removed. This will probably warrant a bit more time spent on the hill rather than the woods and fields, so I've down a bit of digging in the net and Swarovski ballistic tables and was considering altering the zero on the 7 RM. 3.1" high @ 100yd brings zero to 270, max of 3.5" at around 170 and about 12"- at 400. Anybody tried this on this or similar calibers, 300WM etc. the .308 & .243 will be coming up with me for fox, roe and woodland, the 7 is just for hill culling.
All thoughts and opinions and experience gratefully received.

 

Muir

Well-Known Member
Hi chaps. Off back up to Sutherland on the 4th to see what the keeper wants removed. This will probably warrant a bit more time spent on the hill rather than the woods and fields, so I've down a bit of digging in the net and Swarovski ballistic tables and was considering altering the zero on the 7 RM. 3.1" high @ 100yd brings zero to 270, max of 3.5" at around 170 and about 12"- at 400. Anybody tried this on this or similar calibers, 300WM etc. the .308 & .243 will be coming up with me for fox, roe and woodland, the 7 is just for hill culling.
All thoughts and opinions and experience gratefully received.

I use it quite a bit in my 30-06s. With a 150/165 grain bullet at highway speeds you zero at 25M with a standard hunting scope. This puts you about 3"high at 100. You then adjust the windage only. For opoen countey shooting on our deer this allows you to place the cross hairs behind the shoulder and count on a kill-zone hot out to 300 yards without touching the scope. your true 'zero' is at about 210-220 yards.~Muir
 

Yorric

Well-Known Member
I'd suggest setting all your rifles so that the zero is the same - I prefer to use 1" high at 100yards as I normally only shoot out to 250 on deer - That way for most shots at normal stalking ranges you just point & shoot with minor crosshair lift at the long range. If most of your shots are going to be at longer range you may be advised to use 2" high. 3" high zero is fine for long ranges but it can can really do the head in at shorter ranges when you may require very precise bullet placement.
If all your rifles are set at the same height there is less to remember & apply when preparing for the shot -- More time to get it right!
For long range work on live targets you should test for bullet drop of your ammunition in your rifle at different ranges up to & past where you anticipate that your quary will be - at the temperature you expect to hunt in - don't rely on ballistic charts when humane kills are essential.

Ian
 

Danny rem mag

Well-Known Member
Thanks guys. Muir- I'm using 160g partitions at a shade under 3000fps. So is a bit flatter than 30-06 of course, I want to utilise this calibers potential and capabilities, like you said aim and squeeze out to 350 without compensating at all. Ian- I understand what you are saying, but each rifle has it's own strengths , I'm not going to set my 58g 243 the same as the 7mm! You are spot on about practice which is why I had a mate knock this up for me. Hope to get a good session in next week when I get back on dry land. Please keep the thoughts coming!image.jpg
 

pietasvenatores

Well-Known Member
my hill rifle is set at 3.2" high at 100m, which brings my 'dead hold' apart from windage out to 300. used to zero hill rifle at 100 but found when that big stag was poised nicely at 325, there was just too much holding over guesswork. for Reds, 3" high at 100 means a standard H/L shot brought a touch forwards is a perfect high shoulder shot. For the longer shots, aim high shoulder and bullet will end up between there and perfect H/L.
 

MARCBO

Account Suspended
If you think you will be shooting to 400 yards and the target may be 12 inches in size (kill zone) I would recommend you determine what zero range is required to place your shot within that (veritcally centered) and conduct your actual zeroing at that range or as close as you can get to it. Zero you windage at 200, anyhting more invites errors due to winds. We used to teach sniper it is better to zero for range at 500yds and 200yds for wind. This allows the range error to be at both ends of the scale. If you zero at 100 then all error increases as the range increases.

SS
 

tackb

Well-Known Member
I'd zero at 200m and then remember 209 , 2" high at 100 , 0 at 200 , and 9" low at 300 , further than 300 and you will/should have time to set up for the shot by dialing properly.

with 209 you will be close enough for good killing shots out to 300 , taking the 140g accubond in your rem mag , it will actually (give or take) be 1.5'' high at 100 0 ay 200 and 7'' low at 300 , this works for all deer calibres pretty much.
 

Yorric

Well-Known Member
Ian- I understand what you are saying, but each rifle has it's own strengths , I'm not going to set my 58g 243 the same as the 7mm!
Why not? - If they all start off with about the same reasonably short zero then all compensations are in the same direction - less confusing! Just the amount of drop that changes due to differing ballistic properties of your different projectiles.
Happy gonging!

Ian
 

Danny rem mag

Well-Known Member
Happy gonging, that made me laugh! Marcbo- should be -14" at 400 but I wouldn't risk a shot at that range unless the wind was favourable and I'd hope to be able to get a little closer although due to the terrain this isn't always possible, rivers and lochs etc. I'll give it a whirl next week and if I can hit the gong reliably at 350 (7") I'll go with it.
 

MARCBO

Account Suspended
Happy gonging, that made me laugh! Marcbo- should be -14" at 400 but I wouldn't risk a shot at that range unless the wind was favourable and I'd hope to be able to get a little closer although due to the terrain this isn't always possible, rivers and lochs etc. I'll give it a whirl next week and if I can hit the gong reliably at 350 (7") I'll go with it.
Actually shooting the distances for confirmation! Now that is an idea that is not usually considered. Most rely on published tables without eithering firing or chronographing the rifle/load performance.

Just guestimating, I would think -14" at 400 from a 100yd zero is about right but firing will tell the truth. The 30 caliber 168gr SMK at close to 2650fps at the muzzle has almost 5.5MOA (16.5") drop at 400 from a 100yd zero

SS
 
Last edited:

pietasvenatores

Well-Known Member
the thing most people often forget too is that a tiny wobble in the scope or less than perfect trigger pull at 400yds can easily add another 5"-10" of error. Any shooting outside 200yds you got to be damn sure of your skills and performance on the day to make it 'right' in terms of ethics.

I have to agree that sometimes a 'closer' zero which limits your ability to take longer shots if not dialling (an element of self imposed restriction I suppose), means you will have a more interesting stalk, and often memories of a good shot as opposed to one of those 'worst day of the year' experiences with a wounded deer.
 

Southern

Well-Known Member
7mm RM or .270 Win (same trajectories, with different weight bullets), zeroed 2.0 inches high at 100 is just a bit high at 200, and only about 6 inches low at 300 with the right bullets. If you know you are most likely shooting 250 to 300 yards, just turn up 8 clicks to 300 when you get out there, and reset when you get home. Or use a ballistic plex scope like the Burris, Zeiss, Swaro, Nikon or Bushnell. They work well.

However you set it at the range, don't just go hunting at long range with it. Walk the hills, set out some targets, and plink at 100 to 400 yards with your setting, until you find what suits best.
 
Last edited:

Kiwi hunter

Well-Known Member
I've been caught out before assuming that data tables / ballistic apps are correct. Wasted a whole box of ammo in a 270 because the drop at 300 was more than double what was suggested! As has been stated there is no substitute for checking drops at different ranges in the field. I've used the free stelok app downloaded on my phone and found it "bang on" for my 7mm Rem Mag out to 550 yards (shooting open valley in NZ).
Good luck.
Hayden
 

Top