.300 WM projectile selection

s8mdevo

Well-Known Member
I am still waiting to take ownership of a .300wm but have the variation and am looking for the right rifle. In the meantime I would like to start thinking of some loads for the rifle. Any suggestions on powder bullet combinations, pros and cons from experience? The rifle will be used strictly for hunting so expanding heads a must.

Any help appreciated
Cheers
 

NigelM

Well-Known Member
I am still waiting to take ownership of a .300wm but have the variation and am looking for the right rifle. In the meantime I would like to start thinking of some loads for the rifle. Any suggestions on powder bullet combinations, pros and cons from experience? The rifle will be used strictly for hunting so expanding heads a must.

Any help appreciated
Cheers

What are you going to be shooting and what's your maximum range?
 

Southern

Well-Known Member
For goats and sheep, on steep terrain, you want to knock them flat and dead in their tracks, so they don't scamper over a cliff.
Goats are pretty narrow through the chest, but solid through the shoulders, so you have to choose what kind of shots you might take, and then the bullets.

I have used a 180-gr Hornady SST and Sierra Gameking in my .30-06s on sheep and goat, and American elk. I shoot for the heart and lungs, and wanted a bullet which opens quickly at 300 to 400 yards, though none of my shots have been over 250 yards, MV of 2,800 FPS, and all killed on the spot. If you are going to shoot through the shoulders, you might want to consider a 165-gr Barnes TTSX, but I have not tried it on game, yet.
 

NigelM

Well-Known Member
Deer, mountain goat, ibex, elk. Shots are taken out to 400 yards.

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If you're going out as far as 400 yds in the mountains I would be going with a high BC bullet. The 180's are alright in 30 cal but the 200/210 class bullets are best for the job in my opinion. The added benefit is that your MV will be slower so the closer shots are not going to do quite as much damage as they would in the 165/180 grain class.

The best is probably the Nosler 210 ABLR. Coming back from that a Nosler 200 AB or a Sierra 200 SBT. The new Hornaday ELD-X is great for LR, super high BC, but they have't really been proven yet in terms of terminal effect - possibly behave a bit too much like an Amax which is messy at the closer distances.

My 280AI with a slippery 168 grain carries more energy at 400 meters than a 300WM shooting 180's, so why bother with all that extra recoil. Load the 300WM with 210's however and it out performs the 7mm quite convincingly in terms of energy delivered at 400.

Run the ballistics on those out to 400 meters and see what you think. Wind is the real enemy, you can dial trajectory as its a known factor.
 

Southern

Well-Known Member
Since you are talking about a rifle for hunting in rugged terrain, I have to mention also of the trade offs of light weight for carrying but heavy enough to steady down when you are winded. Also, you might be looking at a 22-inch barrel, and no more than 24 inches. A longer barrel is just so much easier to catch on a tree limb, brush, or stub into the ground when going uphill. Same for bulky and heavy scopes.

My Steyr Pro Hunter with iron sights and 600mm barrel is as heavy as I would want ( it's a 7x64, bought just for the sort of hunting you describe ). Not knowing how many different .300 WM or .300 WSM you have shot, I definitely suggest to try a bunch of them, and not just from the bench, for the weight, balance, carrying in the hands and on the shoulder. And try some with the same sort of realistic hunting scope you will use.

I would look for something not too heavy or expensive, like a Begara, Remington 700 or even a Tikka T3 Lite with 22-inch barrels. You can always put a heavier laminated stock on the Tikka to add a pound. Again, it depends on the fit of the rifle and the perceived recoil, to YOU.


You can't figure it out from an armchair, because your rifle may be more accurate with a slow 165-gr or the fastest 200-gr load, and accuracy is first and foremost where you expect to shoot at 300+ yards. That's why I wouldn't worry about the POSSIBILITY of wringing an extra 100 fps from a 26 inch barrel ( weighing 1.5 lbs more ), when a 22-inch rifle may shoot just as fast with the same accuracy as the big rifle.

So, try and buy the rifle first.
Then worry about the bullets and loads. And go try them, in wind, after huffing up hills, and on deer and boar.

A 200-gr bullet is where the .300 magnums really shine, and they arrive with a lot of energy, but that does not mean they deliver it all, especially on a chest shot, because they will just blow through even big game. As a real world note, a 200 grain bullet from a .30-06 or 8mm, arriving at 2,500 fps ( 100 yards ) will shoot through two large boar sideways and a large bear lengthwise.

Craig Boddington has written a lot about using the .300 Win Mag for sheep and goat hunting. Go read his comparisons of it to the 7mms, the .270 WSM, and other cartridges he has used.
 
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Edinburgh Rifles

Well-Known Member
180gr minimum
200gr is where they shine in my opinion

Lower than that and you risk massive carcase damage on anything at distances around the 100-150yds

I used 210gr at 2750fps which was slow for a 300wm but shot accurately out to 600m

180gr has great velocity advantage
130gr .270win MV and drop characteritics with 180gr 30cal bullets

I would avoid SST and similarly frangible Ballistic tips personally
fine if you are ONLY shooting at 300-400yds, anything insde that range will suffer heavy carcase loss

A goo solid cup and core
Lapua Mega, Norma Oryx, Interlock/Interbond, Core-Lokt, etc etc
 

s8mdevo

Well-Known Member
180gr minimum
200gr is where they shine in my opinion

Lower than that and you risk massive carcase damage on anything at distances around the 100-150yds

I used 210gr at 2750fps which was slow for a 300wm but shot accurately out to 600m

180gr has great velocity advantage
130gr .270win MV and drop characteritics with 180gr 30cal bullets

I would avoid SST and similarly frangible Ballistic tips personally
fine if you are ONLY shooting at 300-400yds, anything insde that range will suffer heavy carcase loss

A goo solid cup and core
Lapua Mega, Norma Oryx, Interlock/Interbond, Core-Lokt, etc etc
Thoughts on the 212gr eld-x from hornady? High bc and looks as though would perform good at range and suit the hunter
 

Defender 130

Well-Known Member
I will be trying RWS Evolution 184gr in my Bergara as soon as I either find a dealer with stock or order them from Arms24, RWS blurb on them looks good on everything except Roe


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Uncas

Well-Known Member
Deer, mountain goat, ibex, elk. Shots are taken out to 400 yards.

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A Ruger no 1 with a 26 inch barrel same overall length as a 22 inch bolt gun, 180gr Scirocco at around 3'100/200 fps 400 yards job done if you do your bit.
 

shooternz

Well-Known Member
Could go classic, Ruger No1 in 300 H&H with 26" barrel, my Remington 721 26" 300 H&H shoots 180 grainers at 2970fps with a not very hot load
 

Southern

Well-Known Member
Ruger has made some No.1 A and B in .300 H&H, .300 WM, and .280 Remington in recent years.
I just handled a No.1A Sporter in .300 WM and 24-inch barrel, and a .280 Rem with 22-inch barrel, last week - all $999.00 USD.

But I want a quick second or third shot, just in case, when hunting in steep mountains, where game can get away, hide, or fall out of recovery, if not anchored.
 

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