7mm rem mag load - hill stalking

srvet

Well-Known Member
A 120gr bullet at 2'900fps will drop 10 inches and drift 12/14 inches in a 15/20 mph wind at 300 yds,
Why do some of you insist on using silly light little bullets for a fine game animal like reds,
Is this the responsible face of shooting these day's.
Responsible......yes in so many ways!! :smug:The very reason that I use them is because the performance surpasses the lead core 160 grain bullets in terms of terminal effect, meat damage and lack of environmental and carcass contamination providing the ranges are kept sensible! It is a case of matching the specific bullet performance and velocity to the game and is in no way a poorly considered stunt using light for calibre varmint bullets. My 120 grain 7mm TTSX bullet is monometal and will enter the deer at 120g, expand immediately, create massive temporary and permanent cavitation and will still weigh 120g when it exits (which it will, even in the largest of red deer!) - unlike the lead core bullets that may leave around 50% of the bullet mass hanging around in the carcass and gralloch . The deer drop as if the hammer of Thor has descended upon it and I see FAR less meat damage than with conventional lead core bullets (even on Roe with the 7mm RM) as the particulate lead dust is absent. It is velocity that makes these monometal bullets work, so I wouldnt consider starting it out at the 2900fps that you suggest. My MV is a smidge under 3300fps with the 120g bullet which is not overpressure in any way. For the record I have also used many lead core bullets over the years and find that cup and core softpoint bullets are more likely to result in runners with equivalent shot placement than a fast, light monometal which most commonly cause the "drop right there" effect.
I see from your post that respect for game is now measured in how heavy a bullet you use.... I can only assume that you must use a 700 Nitro, what is the drop like at 300 with that one??!! Sadly it doesnt say much for those that use a 100g bullet in 243 or a 55 g bullet in 222 Remington (obviously for Roe) :coat:
 

srvet

Well-Known Member
This isn't just my theory. Others has had similar ideas. At twenty-four inches, in a .284 bore, you've a "calibre length" of 84 whereas a ,270 WCF a "calibre length" of 86 and a 25-06 has a "calibre length" of 93. By contrast a .30-06 has a "calibre length" of 77.

So what this means is that IMHO your 7mm Remington Magnum will perform the same as a twenty-five inch barrel .30-06 but only as efficiently as a twenty-two inch .270 WCF or a twenty-one inch .25-06. But that for the same weight bullet that a twenty-four inch barrel .25-06 will perform as well as a twenty-six inch barrel 7mm Remington Magnum.

So what does this mean? It means this...or so the theory says. That with 160 grain and above bullets with your barrel length will give an efficiency edge over the same length .30-06 but that in 120 grain it won't perform as well as a .25-06 with a barrel of the same length.
Presumably you are talking about the efficiency in terms of velocity per grain of powder. Honestly, whilst I see what you mean, "frankly my dear, I dont give a damn" if my stalking cartridge is efficient with powder consumption or not! The difference between 45 grains of powder in my 308 and 70 grains of powder in my 7mm is forgotten very quickly and is a fairly negligible expense compared to the rest of the gear, transport costs etc. What matters to me is that I get a bang flop response from the deer as often as possible
 

takbok

Well-Known Member
This isn't just my theory. Others has had similar ideas. At twenty-four inches, in a .284 bore, you've a "calibre length" of 84 whereas a ,270 WCF a "calibre length" of 86 and a 25-06 has a "calibre length" of 93. By contrast a .30-06 has a "calibre length" of 77.

So what this means is that IMHO your 7mm Remington Magnum will perform the same as a twenty-five inch barrel .30-06 but only as efficiently as a twenty-two inch .270 WCF or a twenty-one inch .25-06. But that for the same weight bullet that a twenty-four inch barrel .25-06 will perform as well as a twenty-six inch barrel 7mm Remington Magnum.

So what does this mean? It means this...or so the theory says. That with 160 grain and above bullets with your barrel length will give an efficiency edge over the same length .30-06 but that in 120 grain it won't perform as well as a .25-06 with a barrel of the same length.
Enfieldspares, these ramblings don't make any sense.

Lighter copper bullets work very well. Don't knock them if you've never tried them.
 

turner.jc1

Well-Known Member
Agreed it seems pointless using 120g bullets in a 7RM, seems even more pointless sending them pootling along at 3300. Without looking at QL they should do a bit over 3500 I’d guess... could be fun to have a play with.

Anyway to the OP, whilst your idea of reduced PBR is good, I think the idea of reduced wind drift is better, and the sleek 160g + bullets really don’t drop very fast anyway. There’s also the fact that beyond a certain distance your going to check that distanstance with a rangefinder anyway in reality.
 

takbok

Well-Known Member
A 120gr bullet at 2'900fps will drop 10 inches and drift 12/14 inches in a 15/20 mph wind at 300 yds,
Why do some of you insist on using silly light little bullets for a fine game animal like reds,
Is this the responsible face of shooting these day's.
It's very responsible. I'll continue to use 'silly light' copper bullets as they work perfectly. I'd happily use 50gr copper bullets if it were legal.

It's maybe better to get some experience with these bullets before writing them off and giving poor advice.
 

7mmNick

Active Member
That looks on the ragged edge! I bet your brass doesnt last too long!!
Haha yep i wouldnt go any further for fears of chamber pressure. Brass does well. 6 firing so far annealed each time. Slight extractor mark on case head but thats it. No heavy bolt lift . Using norma brass which i feel helps a little
 

A Guy Out West

Well-Known Member
Op, use a 140 gr partition and call it good. You could also use the all copper bullets that Takbok suggested, they are excellent. The thing about the Barnes bullets is that you get a 120 gr to begin with and to end with. They are predictable! A 150 gr soft point may shed more than 30 gr of lead when hitting meat and bone. What is your bulletin weight then? I have found the X bullets to work as advertised to be very accurate. Good shooting to you.
 

johngryphon

Well-Known Member
Or you can simply use 150 grain Winchester factory super x PP`s. They have been running through my 7mm mag for 40 years at all sorts of ranges,accurate and hit hard. IE They knock big deer down...you do you part too.

If you dont know of Nick Harvey I will advise that he has done a lot of reloading books, (10) knows his stuff and is oft quoted.

The print attachment I only saw recently and saved it.

Bottom line....factory,no friggin about and cheapest prices too.





uncle nick win.jpg
 

25 Sharps

Well-Known Member
Haha yep i wouldnt go any further for fears of chamber pressure. Brass does well. 6 firing so far annealed each time. Slight extractor mark on case head but thats it. No heavy bolt lift . Using norma brass which i feel helps a little
ANY extractor mark is a potential sign over ovepressure, you have enough pressure to be pushing brass back through the case head and it really is telling you to back off a bit.

Some scary stuff gets posted on this forum sometimes!

 
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25 Sharps

Well-Known Member
Or you can simply use 150 grain Winchester factory super x PP`s. They have been running through my 7mm mag for 40 years at all sorts of ranges,accurate and hit hard. IE They knock big deer down...you do you part too.

If you dont know of Nick Harvey I will advise that he has done a lot of reloading books, (10) knows his stuff and is oft quoted.

The print attachment I only saw recently and saved it.

Bottom line....factory,no friggin about and cheapest prices too.





View attachment 138542
Your factory ammo must be cheaper than ours, there isn't a round I load for where the component cost isn't a saving of around 40% or more, some rounds are around 1/3 the cost of the factory equivalent.
 
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johngryphon

Well-Known Member
A two hour round trip to the LGS for components also adds to costs with today`s fuel prices.
I do understand that reloading can be far cheaper too but for simplicity sometimes factory ammo is very good as far as suitability for the purpose.

I bought Win 150 PP`s last week in 30-06. 2 boxes for $70
And also bought one box of Yank Eagle .338 Lapua for $110 AUD

I cant quote 7mm Win prices as I bought a heap quite a few years ago and still use them.

50 Pom quid = around 100 Aussies atm.
 

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