A rubbish knife that won't sharpen...return?

VSS

Well-Known Member
#22
I won a boker in a competition, steel was absolutely horrendous, wouldn’t hold a sharp for anytime, in the end it fell on the grinder and is no more

For a general day to day knife at work I use the Mora’s or frost, at least they take an edge and hang on to it for a while and normaly stainless

I got the feeling there are some bad copies out there, bokers used to be a half tidy blade
Funny you should say that - I bought 2 Mora knives after seeing them recommended on here, and I think they're hopeless! Almost impossible to get an edge on, and when I do it doesn't last!
Maybe my technique, but I don't think so, as I have no trouble at all getting a razor edge on my trusty Buck 110. And it holds it. I've just cut up 3 sheep without any need to re-sharpen.
 
#23
Funny you should say that - I bought 2 Mora knives after seeing them recommended on here, and I think they're hopeless! Almost impossible to get an edge on, and when I do it doesn't last!
Maybe my technique, but I don't think so, as I have no trouble at all getting a razor edge on my trusty Buck 110. And it holds it. I've just cut up 3 sheep without any need to re-sharpen.
How are you sharpening them and what angle? Not trying to teach you to suck eggs or anything. Sharpened a couple of my moras at the weekend and am now nearly hairless on one arm... lol 1000 stone to a 5000 then a strop, 15 minutes work or so bearing in mind it was in bad nick with chips in the blade
 
#27
I picked up a Boker many years ago and the quality really stood out. I remember it took some effort to put a sharp edge on but I took my time with a Lansky system I was able to loan for the job. After some research on the web it turned out to be a quality model made in Germany they were/are known as tree brand when they moved to America. I was taken to it so much I now have several which I have now sharpened on my own Diamond Lansky System. My go to knife now is also used by my shooting buddies because it holds its edge for longer than there knives, when we have several Fallow to prepare for the cold store. It will slice paper like a razor to start with then later,when at home I will dress the edge lightly to be back ready for our next outing.It has a washable synthetic grip so it is a recent model, from the extensive list of blades made by Boker, I would highly recommend mine.

BC.
 
#29
I picked up a Boker many years ago and the quality really stood out. I remember it took some effort to put a sharp edge on but I took my time with a Lansky system I was able to loan for the job. After some research on the web it turned out to be a quality model made in Germany they were/are known as tree brand when they moved to America. I was taken to it so much I now have several which I have now sharpened on my own Diamond Lansky System. My go to knife now is also used by my shooting buddies because it holds its edge for longer than there knives, when we have several Fallow to prepare for the cold store. It will slice paper like a razor to start with then later,when at home I will dress the edge lightly to be back ready for our next outing.It has a washable synthetic grip so it is a recent model, from the extensive list of blades made by Boker, I would highly recommend mine.

BC.

Yep, my Boker is still razor sharp after 25 years and lots and lots of use.

Shame that it appears that they have gone down the mass produced route like so many other iconic names.

Moras are great, but I must admit I only carry them as a back up now as the edges just dont seem to last compared with mid cost blades.

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#32
Looking closer tonight this is labelled 'Magnum by Boker' not a 'Boker magnum'. May explain the apparent lesser quality? I guess Magnum is their budget range and Elk hunter is the actual model...its all in the wording eh?

Tbh I had another go last night and got an 'OK' edge. Whats a little puzzling is, while I'm no expert sharpener, I can get a very good edge on Moras & Victorinox using my system. Different steel and grind though I suppose. Ill persevere!
 
#33
I picked up a Boker many years ago and the quality really stood out. I remember it took some effort to put a sharp edge on but I took my time with a Lansky system I was able to loan for the job. After some research on the web it turned out to be a quality model made in Germany they were/are known as tree brand when they moved to America. I was taken to it so much I now have several which I have now sharpened on my own Diamond Lansky System. My go to knife now is also used by my shooting buddies because it holds its edge for longer than there knives, when we have several Fallow to prepare for the cold store. It will slice paper like a razor to start with then later,when at home I will dress the edge lightly to be back ready for our next outing.It has a washable synthetic grip so it is a recent model, from the extensive list of blades made by Boker, I would highly recommend mine.

BC.
Agreed.... proper Solingen steel from when Boker made proper knives!

I inherited the one second left from my father and it’s my go to knife too...lovely slim razor sharp blade that’s a cinch to keep sharp!

The others all came from fleabay when they still sold knives....also given a couple more away because they make exceedingly good knives! As the cake maker might say.

Cheers

Fizz
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#34
Too late to edit the above.... there were 3 models in this series...the deep bladed skinner is a 501, the others are 502’s and there was a 503 with a shallower filleting shape of blade.... didn’t fancy the shape so I never bought one.

They still appear now and again on fleabay US.

Fizz
 

Chasey

Well-Known Member
#35
As other have said you can put an edge on pretty much anything.
Only issue is how long it will retain said edge.

I try an avoid complicated edges on knives. I have found using sharpeners like Warthog do an excellent job of maintaining and edge but if the edge has been misshapen or damaged I have to go back to my belt grinder to get it started off right again then revert to the warthog.

Once the warthog has it sharp I can use a strop to polish it to hair shaving levels but those edges require some amazing steel to stand up to much work

For me the Outdoor Edge swing blade takes a lot of beating when matched with a Victoria Knox boning knife for tunnelling larger anamals

I upgraded to a Dalstrong boning knife but only because it looked pretty

https://gb-dalstrong.glopalstore.com/collections/shogun-series/products/ss-6-in-boning
 

Tom D

Well-Known Member
#40
I think as others have said, any steel can be sharpened razor sharp, the quality comes in in terms of how long the edge will hold and how it will resist damage.

I sharpened a friends butchery knife recently I was disappointed with the first attempt, I had just done what makes mine razor sharp.. the answer was that I hadn’t gone long enough on the course stone. His knife had obviously been sharpened at another angle and I had not completely reprofiled the knife to the new angle before moving on to the finer stone and strop. Second attempt I kept going longer on the course stone and then hey presto, shaving sharp...
Properly reprofiling the edge to your desired angle first will likely solve the problem.
 

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