A rubbish knife that won't sharpen...return?

Sheprador1973

Well-Known Member
Quick update...

Should have titled the thread 'A rubbish sharpener that can't sharpen...return to the doghouse?'...

Had a final go this evening. Reprofiled using 180 grit (!) and then worked up more slowly, carefully and angling the drop point to meet the stone at 90 degrees. Stopped at 2000. Nice and sharp now!!! Used a longer strop too and think that may have a made a difference. Now cuts paper and hair easy peasy. So apologies to magnum@Boker :lol: Of course I don't know how long the edge will last bus now got a v sharp knife that looks good (to me) for not much £. Mind you, its taken about 4 hours in total to get there!

Many thanks for all your advice, pics and comments...really helpful guys. Special thanks to Cottis too who has gone out of his way via PM to help further. Really appreciate it :)
 

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spandit

Well-Known Member
Don't know why all my knives go blunt. All I do is hammer them through a big stack of terracotta tiles
 

CarlW

Well-Known Member
Quick update...

Should have titled the thread 'A rubbish sharpener that can't sharpen...return to the doghouse?'...

Had a final go this evening. Reprofiled using 180 grit (!) and then worked up more slowly, carefully and angling the drop point to meet the stone at 90 degrees. Stopped at 2000. Nice and sharp now!!! Used a longer strop too and think that may have a made a difference. Now cuts paper and hair easy peasy. So apologies to magnum@Boker :lol: Of course I don't know how long the edge will last bus now got a v sharp knife that looks good (to me) for not much £. Mind you, its taken about 4 hours in total to get there!

Many thanks for all your advice, pics and comments...really helpful guys. Special thanks to Cottis too who has gone out of his way via PM to help further. Really appreciate it :)
Pretty knife, by the way.
 

.25-06

Well-Known Member
The edge will come with practice. From the second photo looks like plenty more time required to get two clean and crisp bevels. You'll need to practice putting edges on everything from tattie peelers to craft knives then when you get the chance of a special steel knife you can put a good edge to it
 

Sheprador1973

Well-Known Member
The edge will come with practice. From the second photo looks like plenty more time required to get two clean and crisp bevels. You'll need to practice putting edges on everything from tattie peelers to craft knives then when you get the chance of a special steel knife you can put a good edge to it
Time required doing precisiely what please .25-06? I mean, should i be going back to harsher grits or spending more time on the finer ones? Ive just got various YouTube vids to go on so any further advice would be really helpful thanks. Agreed practice will make me better...:)
 

Kramdrazzi

Member
Boker make three main grades of knife:-

Manufaktur Solingen range are hand made in Germany

The Arbolito range are hand made in Argentina

The Plus range are designed in Germany and made in various places in USA, Asia and Europe.

The Magnum range are not made by Boker, but for Boker and all in China.

EVERY Boker knife, regardless of provenance has a lifetime warranty.

Importer/distributor for all Boker in UK is now GMK.

The Arbolito range with 440C steel (so a slightly higher carbon content) take an edge very well. The Magnum range not so much.
 

CarlW

Well-Known Member
Boker make three main grades of knife:-

Manufaktur Solingen range are hand made in Germany

The Arbolito range are hand made in Argentina

The Plus range are designed in Germany and made in various places in USA, Asia and Europe.

The Magnum range are not made by Boker, but for Boker and all in China.

EVERY Boker knife, regardless of provenance has a lifetime warranty.

Importer/distributor for all Boker in UK is now GMK.

The Arbolito range with 440C steel (so a slightly higher carbon content) take an edge very well. The Magnum range not so much.
That is really helpful. Didn't know about the different ranges. Thank you.
 

.25-06

Well-Known Member
Time required doing precisiely what please .25-06? I mean, should i be going back to harsher grits or spending more time on the finer ones? Ive just got various YouTube vids to go on so any further advice would be really helpful thanks. Agreed practice will make me better...:)
Time required putting an edge on anything....hone down the sharpening time. Don't scratch the edges of the blades and keep the honing angle exact. There are no quick fixes start as you have and build the knowledge levels
 

.25-06

Well-Known Member
Boker make three main grades of knife:-

Manufaktur Solingen range are hand made in Germany

The Arbolito range are hand made in Argentina

The Plus range are designed in Germany and made in various places in USA, Asia and Europe.

The Magnum range are not made by Boker, but for Boker and all in China.

EVERY Boker knife, regardless of provenance has a lifetime warranty.

Importer/distributor for all Boker in UK is now GMK.

The Arbolito range with 440C steel (so a slightly higher carbon content) take an edge very well. The Magnum range not so much.
This is the sort of information you usually find out after the purchase:rolleyes:
 

Sheprador1973

Well-Known Member
Time required putting an edge on anything....hone down the sharpening time. Don't scratch the edges of the blades and keep the honing angle exact. There are no quick fixes start as you have and build the knowledge levels
Ah I see, sorry misunderstood. You mean put more practice in generally on several blades rather than work much more on the magnum.

What Im finding frustrating is Im doing everything 'but the book' and as advised. I end up with what should be a very sharp edge but after stropping find it doesn't even cut the edge of a piece of paper. This is not the knife pictured btw...a Gerber that Im trying to get a bit sharper as well.
 

.25-06

Well-Known Member
I have never got around to stropping a knife to perfect the edge but you should easily attain shaving sharp with a stone. Make sure the honing angles are exact when I do it freehand I naturally revert too a slightly shallower angle when drawing a blade back towards me which is enough to dull the blade off shaving sharp. Concentration is required throughout the process.
 

bullet chucker

Well-Known Member
I have found that I have to look very closely at the actual cutting edge after sharpening a different knife,as what seemed to be a good job to start with can in fact be quite poor as the sharpening or grinding right up to the edge may not have been achieved as said above. Have a look at your cutting edge with a magnifying glass all the way along of what you have just 'sharpened' you may be surprised. Another indication is,..if you get a reflection back when looking straight at the blade edge,at that point it is not sharpened.It will also show on the paper slicing test by tearing the paper as the blade is drawn down..Makes me shudder when folk test an edge with the hair on their arm or run a thumb along the edge!

BC.
 

Alantoo

Well-Known Member
I have found that I have to look very closely at the actual cutting edge after sharpening a different knife,as what seemed to be a good job to start with can in fact be quite poor as the sharpening or grinding right up to the edge may not have been achieved as said above. Have a look at your cutting edge with a magnifying glass all the way along of what you have just 'sharpened' you may be surprised. Another indication is,..if you get a reflection back when looking straight at the blade edge,at that point it is not sharpened.It will also show on the paper slicing test by tearing the paper as the blade is drawn down..Makes me shudder when folk test an edge with the hair on their arm or run a thumb along the edge!

BC.
My Father was a woodworker/furniture maker. When he was showing me how to sharpen plane blades and chisels he had this really useful mnemonic to help you remember that an edge is just the coming together of two planes...

"If you can see an edge, there isn't one"

Alan
 

Scapegoat

Well-Known Member
This is where the lansky kit comes into its own. I start on one side and make sure the blade is clamped nicely into the jig. I use a medium stone to start with on a new blade, and you can see where the stone is removing metal. It's important to find the angle that matches that of the blade,and I found the 25 degree angle matched the Boker more or less. (It's a field knife, so a 25 degree edge is about right for dressing deer) Keep the stone clean. I remove any build-up each time I turn the knife over to move onto the other side. A clogged stone will not grind, despite what some folk tell you about a nice "grinding paste".

As you grind along the edge you can tell that you are removing metal by feeling for a bevel on the underneath with your fingernail. Get enough light onto the work so you can see that the stone is removing the metal on top in an even manner, not missing half of the edge surface, or worse, only grinding the spine/shoulder, and not the edge.

You need to create a bevel with the medium stone, then turn the blade over and repeat with the same grade stone, again until you can feel a bevel. Once this bevel runs along the whole length of the blade, turn it again and move onto a finer grade stone. Again, grind methodically and evenly until you can feel another bevel under the blade. Again, once that bevel runs the length of the blade, flip the knife and clean the stone before grinding again.

Each time you create a new bevel you can be certain that the stone has ground right to the edge. Each time you move onto a finer stone you create a finer bevel. The first few strokes after each time you flip the blade removes the bevel and starts the process again. By the time you get to the finest stone in the kit, that bevel will be minute. The last few strokes should be as light as you can to remove the bevel, and this is where the strop comes in.

Use a strop board, (mine is a bit of spare lath with a piece of leather upholstery sample gorilla-glued onto it) and load the leather with polishing compound. I use jeweller's rose -Smurf Poo off eBay. Use long, light, even strokes matching the angle of the ground edge to the leather and stroke away from the cutting edge. Use the same number of strokes on either side, and don't be tempted to do the flashy flip-flop style of stropping, this simply means the angle will vary each time and eventually create a rounded or convex edge.

It takes a lot of time and patience to get it right, but mine will slice hair from my arm without any pressure applied.
 

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