A Special Thanks to UKDTR

On Friday morning i had shot a roebuck which ran 20 yards into standing corn and dropped.When i came to recover what i assumed would be a dead animal the buck got up and ran 100 yards before disappearing into a very dense area of woodland; there was no chance of a follow up shot. I examined the shot site and the area where the deer had laid up and all i had was stomach content and a very small amount of dark blood. I then went to the area where it had entered the wood but i now had nothing to work with in terms of any visible trail and decided to withdraw. I pondered my options and realised there was only one, so I called Tony from UKDTR (Cooking Fat on here). In just over an hour we were at the shot site discussing events and Tony set to work with his young dog but after a couple of false trails we were beginning to fear the worst. Despite the hot weather and far from ideal conditions Tony suggested one last attempt and shortly past where the buck had disappeared his dog took a strong track along the wood edge; after about 100 yards he let the dog off into some thick cover and a while later the dog indicated that he had found my buck.

Thank you Tony, UKDTR is a great credit to you and a superb service. So if you ever need a dog to recover a wounded deer don't hesitate to call them.

F
 

Tim.243

Well-Known Member
On Friday morning i had shot a roebuck which ran 20 yards into standing corn and dropped.When i came to recover what i assumed would be a dead animal the buck got up and ran 100 yards before disappearing into a very dense area of woodland; there was no chance of a follow up shot. I examined the shot site and the area where the deer had laid up and all i had was stomach content and a very small amount of dark blood. I then went to the area where it had entered the wood but i now had nothing to work with in terms of any visible trail and decided to withdraw. I pondered my options and realised there was only one, so I called Tony from UKDTR (Cooking Fat on here). In just over an hour we were at the shot site discussing events and Tony set to work with his young dog but after a couple of false trails we were beginning to fear the worst. Despite the hot weather and far from ideal conditions Tony suggested one last attempt and shortly past where the buck had disappeared his dog took a strong track along the wood edge; after about 100 yards he let the dog off into some thick cover and a while later the dog indicated that he had found my buck.

Thank you Tony, UKDTR is a great credit to you and a superb service. So if you ever need a dog to recover a wounded deer don't hesitate to call them.

F

Sounds a very fast responce coupled with a good out come.


Well done.


Tim.243
 

cookingfat

Well-Known Member
On Friday morning i had shot a roebuck which ran 20 yards into standing corn and dropped.When i came to recover what i assumed would be a dead animal the buck got up and ran 100 yards before disappearing into a very dense area of woodland; there was no chance of a follow up shot. I examined the shot site and the area where the deer had laid up and all i had was stomach content and a very small amount of dark blood. I then went to the area where it had entered the wood but i now had nothing to work with in terms of any visible trail and decided to withdraw. I pondered my options and realised there was only one, so I called Tony from UKDTR (Cooking Fat on here). In just over an hour we were at the shot site discussing events and Tony set to work with his young dog but after a couple of false trails we were beginning to fear the worst. Despite the hot weather and far from ideal conditions Tony suggested one last attempt and shortly past where the buck had disappeared his dog took a strong track along the wood edge; after about 100 yards he let the dog off into some thick cover and a while later the dog indicated that he had found my buck.

Thank you Tony, UKDTR is a great credit to you and a superb service. So if you ever need a dog to recover a wounded deer don't hesitate to call them.

F

Thanks Frank,
yes tracking conditions where hard as its been so dry and no visible blood, also the dog didn't indicate any along the trail,
it never ceases to amaze me how far these animals can run when the adrenaline is high,
you also did all the right things,
you didn't push it any more once you saw to running off,
pushing a deer that is still very mobile when the adrenaline is still high can just make things worse as you said it was close to your boundary!
you marked where the shot site was
you contacted your neighbour in case we needed to fallow a cross a boundary
you phone for help,

it was my pleasure to help an nice to meet you and some of the others syndicate members
I hope our next meeting will be under more pleasurable circumstance

Tony
 
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