Advertising Standards or not

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CRIMSONBULLSEYE

Well-Known Member
Hi,if there is anyone out there who knows how i stand with this one?????

I responded to a rifle advertised by a reputable gun dealer and purchased a rifle unseen through their web sight.

The order was accepted,a few hours later i received an e-mail telling me that my order was canceled because the price was incorrect.

I responded asking why,and was told that there had been a typing error and the rifle was not for sale at that price.

How do i stand,or they stand legally with my purchase or their sale :confused:...C

P.S.I have a receipt for the sale...
 

jimbo123p

Well-Known Member
If it was a genuine error they need not sell at that price. If it is an advertising scam it is illegal. There have been several genuine errors on here. No one commercial or private is forced to sell if a misprint has the wrong price.
 

Paul at Fechan

Well-Known Member
If money left your account then it should be yours but they can cancel a transaction and credit your account so legally it's not clear cut. If you have paid out you are allowed to claim back 'expenses' and a cancellation fee which is reasonable in such circumstances. That could be up 10% and considered reasonable because of credit charges, loan costs etc

Bang them an email saying if they are not going to honor the purchase then you will charge them a 10% fee based of expenses and time wasted and then follow it up if they try to fob you off.
 
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Apache

Well-Known Member
Your rights Unfortunately, under contract law in many cases the retailer doesn’t have to honour an order when it’s made after a pricing glitch or mistake.
If the mistake occurs in a shop the retailer can refuse your money at the till and withdraw the product from sale while it prices it correctly. This is because the retailer is not actually ‘offering to sell’ the goods for the price indicated; it is what the law calls an ‘invitation to treat’ i.e. the retailer is inviting customers to make an offer to buy. However, they can refuse to accept the customer’s money as there’s no contract between the two parties.
It gets a bit more complicated when goods are sold online as it depends on whether a contract has been made between the two parties.
The retailer needs to accept the customer’s order for there to be a contract. If it hasn’t accepted the order it can withdraw the product from sale and cancel the order. Exactly where you stand will depend on the website’s terms and conditions and the wording of any e-mail sent to you when you placed the order.
Many websites say in their terms that an order is only accepted when the goods are dispatched. Any e-mail sent to the customer beforehand is simply an acknowledgement of receipt – as opposed to acceptance - of the order.
But in some cases the wording of the e-mail will have accepted the customer’s order and the customer would generally be entitled to purchase the goods at the advertised price.

Your rights when stores mis-price items
 

teabag_46

Well-Known Member
the retailer is inviting customers to make an offer to buy. However, they can refuse to accept the customer’s money as there’s no contract between the two parties.

Seems to me then that we should all begin haggling, as that would indicate that prices are not 'set in stone'! ;D
 

bewsher500

Well-Known Member
not sure that is the case to be honest

I purchased something at 5-10% of its value because someone had written a price on a security tag and stuck it in the window

where do you draw the distinction between advertising error and advertising fraud?
too easy to say "oh sorry that is the wrong price"

if they have taken the order and received payment then I suspect a good lawyer would argue you have a contract
unfortunately if you have received the money back for lack of stock etc then the contract does not hold water
​but he has admitted they do have stock.....
 

Virbius

Well-Known Member
Seems to me then that we should all begin haggling, as that would indicate that prices are not 'set in stone'! ;D
Any goods that have a price tag is simply an 'invitation to tender', you are entirely within your rights to take the goods to the till and offer a lower price. If the lower price is not accepted you can walk away, whether it be a car, rifle, shirt or a trolley full of groceries at Sainsbury.
 

smullery

Well-Known Member
Hi,if there is anyone out there who knows how i stand with this one?????

I responded to a rifle advertised by a reputable gun dealer and purchased a rifle unseen through their web sight.

The order was accepted,a few hours later i received an e-mail telling me that my order was canceled because the price was incorrect.

I responded asking why,and was told that there had been a typing error and the rifle was not for sale at that price.

How do i stand,or they stand legally with my purchase or their sale :confused:...C

P.S.I have a receipt for the sale...


As soon as the human realised there was a problem with the website he contacted you to correct the error.

You think this is unfair when you have 14 days in which to cancel your purchase ?

​Stan
 
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