Advice needed

Woodsmoke

Well-Known Member
Hi guys,

I'm converting this outbuilding into stables, and want to start by installing a couple of 6" wooden uprights to the floor to act as door jambs. I really want to avoid concreting them in if at all possible, but they need to be solid enough to withstand a horse potentially barging into them. I thought of using metaposts and anchor bolts, maybe? :-|

Any advice more than welcome as I really don't know how best to proceed.

FB_IMG_1570176576345.jpgHopefully the SD massif will once again throw up some great advice :thumb:
 

The fourth Horseman

Well-Known Member
Sorry should have also said render walls containing a strong fungicide if cattle have ever been in there.Anti ringworm, I know someone who got it from exposed stone walls in a very smart barn conversion.
 

Heimdall

Well-Known Member
If its was me I would use some heavy duty L brackets 2 per post bolted to the floor and then screwed to the uprights. also use bitumen on the bottom of each post to reduce rot. Done this way you can replace posts if needed. but that me, Dont know how a walking tripod would do it ;)
 

vitalspark

Well-Known Member
Hi guys,

I'm converting this outbuilding into stables, and want to start by installing a couple of 6" wooden uprights to the floor to act as door jambs. I really want to avoid concreting them in if at all possible, but they need to be solid enough to withstand a horse potentially barging into them. I thought of using metaposts and anchor bolts, maybe? :-|

Any advice more than welcome as I really don't know how best to proceed.

View attachment 138138Hopefully the SD massif will once again throw up some great advice :thumb:
Just finished building a standalone stable onto a concrete slab. Timber sole plate was fixed to concrete using epoxy anchors every 600mm. Timber studs were nailed to sole plate as per a normal stud partition. 18mm ply kickboard was then nailed to studs and plates at 150mm centres to provide wind racking to the inside of the stables. I used external cladding on the outer face. Alternatively you could use 12mm ply on the inner and outer faces of the partition. Hope this helps
 

Woodsmoke

Well-Known Member
Just finished building a standalone stable onto a concrete slab. Timber sole plate was fixed to concrete using epoxy anchors every 600mm
That's a good idea! The door jamb needs to be absolutely solid though. Not sure I could get that by fixing it to a sole plate? Perhaps I'm overthinking it?
 

kes

Well-Known Member
I would go with the bolted down plates like metposts. Drill out to use bigger bolts, if necessary (and washers)
Its simpler to replace if needed but caveats as per 4th Horseman.
Plenty on the web £5-10 each I'd go for 6" min. If you know a blacksmith, he will make some that wont fail.
 

vitalspark

Well-Known Member
That's a good idea! The door jamb needs to be absolutely solid though. Not sure I could get that by fixing it to a sole plate? Perhaps I'm overthinking it?
the
The sole plate anchors were cut lengths of M16 stainless threaded bar epoxy'd into 20mm diam holes in the concrete. The ply makes the whole thing absolutely rigid. Brick **** house construction on a very exposed site in the Outer Hebrides. Cheers
 

Woodsmoke

Well-Known Member
I had to completely revise my plans to bolt the uprights to the floor! Half an hour of drilling dulled two bits, overheated my drill, and almost shook my eyeballs out of my head! That floor is made of some tough stuff!!! :lol:

I ended up bolting them to the steel stanchions at either side of the barn, then bolted the door jamb to the cross-member, and bolted everything else together with M12 threaded bar, as well as a couple of brackets to attach the uprights to the floor.

Embarrassingly, I spent far more time taking it apart and redoing it than anticipated :oops::lol:

The next one should take probably half the time!!
20191010_193848.jpg
 

tozzybum

Well-Known Member
Was it an SDS Drill or a "hammer drill" ,like yourself after a couple of melted drill bits SDS was the game changer for me ,far better into solid stone and old blooming hard bricks <House built 1870 > .Good job improvising ,wouldnt like to be near any hosswhen it kicks out .
 

vitalspark

Well-Known Member
Was it an SDS Drill or a "hammer drill" ,like yourself after a couple of melted drill bits SDS was the game changer for me ,far better into solid stone and old blooming hard bricks <House built 1870 > .Good job improvising ,wouldnt like to be near any hosswhen it kicks out .
I used a Hilti TE-YX sds bit for my anchors which will even cut through the rebar! £30 a pop mind you.
 

Woodsmoke

Well-Known Member
Finally done! Feels like its been a year of work, and a hundred redesigns, but it's done! Melted several drill bits, killed two cheap drills, hacksawed what feels like a hundred yards of threaded bar, burst several blood blisters, and used a years worth of swearing in only a few weeks. But! I'm finally done.

Thanks fellas. Those who had the knowledge to give me advice saved me a whole load of pain!!
 

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johngryphon

Well-Known Member
We have camped in high country bush huts at times,some of which in were such a state of disrepair that yours is the Hilton.
 

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