Advice on building a larder / cold room

awmc

Well-Known Member
I’m sure this has been dealt with before but I’m building a larder / cold room from scratch and would appreciate advice and tips from folk who’ve done this recently.
Particularly about things they would do differently if they did it again

The space and access allows for a building approximately 6 metres by 12 metres and I’ve started laying the shuttering for a concrete base and linking up water and electricity supply.

Thank you in advance for anything you learned when you did it
 
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User00014

Well-Known Member
I have a 3m x 2m cold room which is cooled via single phase compressor unit and it costs approx £2-£3 a day to run.

I was told by the engineer I used that it runs better if you don’t turn it off which I have done and it has served me well.

If i was to start again I would bite the bullet and buy a monobloc chiller unit that just plugs in the wall like any other appliance and are apparently a lot more efficient
 

Mick9abf

Well-Known Member
Have a look at this containerised one which has the advantage of being portable
https://www.thestalkingdirectory.co...bile-butchery-container-with-built-in-chiller

I saw a similar one fairly recently and think it cost in the region of £7.5 - 10k plumbed in on a concrete base if I remember correctly and thought it was fairly reasonable for a commercial type set up bearing in mind a new ISO container will cost you circa £1500 + vat give or take a couple of hundred sheets.
 

labrador77

Well-Known Member
Make sure you have a surge protector for the control unit, an electrical storm killed my first one, an expensive oversight! Allow yourself plenty of working space too, keep your eyes peeled for bargain catering sinks, cupboards, machinery etc. Just tiled the floor in our chiller and cutting room as the non slip concrete was a bugger to keep clean.
 

jcampbellsmith

Well-Known Member
My Dad had seen a lot of larders when he had his larder built. It has a sloping floors to a drain in the centre. It’s a rectangle and the rail on the ceiling runs round approximately a metre out from the walls.
The walls aren’t pressure washable, they need to be. The whole larder needs to be easy to clean.
It’s high enough for the biggest stag.
It’s small, so only has one door. I’ve seen bigger larders with a handling room and a separate chill. The chill has a separate exit so chilled deer never come back into the handling area.
Make sure there’s a good concrete pad at the door(s). Make sure the electric winch can winch out of the delivering vehicle and up to the rail.
Scales are a pain. Try and get the scales integrated into the hoist, however this does mean your hoist is higher up.
Taps that can be operated with your elbows are handy.
Have as few fixtures and fittings as possible inside the larder. The less there is, the less to keep clean. Have a bug zapper.

Dropbox - Larder in use.jpg

Good luck.
JCS
 
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Monkey Spanker

Well-Known Member
I saw a similar one fairly recently and think it cost in the region of £7.5 - 10k plumbed in on a concrete base if I remember correctly and thought it was fairly reasonable for a commercial type set up bearing in mind a new ISO container will cost you circa £1500 + vat give or take a couple of hundred sheets.
That one was homemade and cost a lot less.
 

deerstalker.308

Well-Known Member
If buying components secondhand be aware that they cost money to have decommissioned, so don’t be conned into buying something that someone else is just trying to avoid throwing away! Ok, it may still have a value (to you at least) but just be aware you may be buying someone else’s rubbish!
 

awmc

Well-Known Member
Thank you very much for all the replies above
Your time and help much appreciated
The container idea is attractive but getting one onto the site would take some skill. The advice about size, mono bloc units, surge protectors, second hand equipment and not having too much stuff in it is all very helpful
If there’s anything else please chip in
Thanks
 
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