And today, in Jay's continuing adventure in learning to reload....

#1
there have been some valuable lessons.
1: don't reload when you're tired.
2: Remember to prime your newly trimmed and chamfered brass BEFORE you add powder and bullets.
3: kinetic hammers are a really useful addition to the loading kit and it was a smart decision to buy one before I needed it.
4: It doesn't matter how carefully you measure things with your shiny new OAL gauge and callipers, or how carefully you seat your bullets so that all the rounds are exactly the ideal length for your precisely measured chamber length, if you haven't measured the inside of your bloody magazine.
You're still a complete numpty when sitting at the shooting bench wondering why your rounds won't fit in the magazine and have to pack everything back up again and take it all back to the workshop to seat the bullets 1.5mm deeper in the cases so they'll actually fit in the mag and chamber when you cycle the action.
 

rem284

Well-Known Member
#3
[FONT=&amp]there have been some valuable lessons.[/FONT]
[FONT=&amp]1: don't reload when you're tired.[/FONT]
[FONT=&amp]2: Remember to prime your newly trimmed and chamfered brass BEFORE you add powder and bullets.[/FONT]
[FONT=&amp]3: kinetic hammers are a really useful addition to the loading kit and it was a smart decision to buy one before I needed it.[/FONT]
[FONT=&amp]4: It doesn't matter how carefully you measure things with your shiny new OAL gauge and callipers, or how carefully you seat your bullets so that all the rounds are exactly the ideal length for your precisely measured chamber length, if you haven't measured the inside of your bloody magazine.
You're still a complete numpty when sitting at the shooting bench wondering why your rounds won't fit in the magazine and have to pack everything back up again and take it all back to the workshop to seat the bullets 1.5mm deeper in the cases so they'll actually fit in the mag and chamber when you cycle the action.[/FONT]
Ha, so funny. I have done the powder filling without the primers in before as well. Infact I think I have done them all. Add to your list, If someone pops in for a yarn just stop. Dont try and carry on when someone is nipping your head
 
#4
The load was an average load, plenty of spare space in the case so seating it lower shouldn't be an issue if it's not compressing the load, should it? I haven't worked up an accuracy load yet, that's next on the list, though I'm pretty much stuck with this cartridge length or perhaps a hair longer, it's certainly not going to be just 'off the lands' or it won't go in the magazine.

After a single cold bore shot, I put 3 shots in less than an inch so it seems to be a decent load, no sign of any pressure issues with the cases afterwards.

I'm open to anything you can add to make me safer on this, which is why I post my mistakes along the journey, it's all about trying to learn to be as safe and accurate as possible.

tell me you did not work up the load then seat 1.5mm deeper....it will have consequences and may stop the learning adventure :doh:
 
#5
Ha, so funny. I have done the powder filling without the primers in before as well. Infact I think I have done them all. Add to your list, If someone pops in for a yarn just stop. Dont try and carry on when someone is nipping your head
The only company in the workshop I'll accept and keep on loading is the dog, curled up on the floor next to my stool at the bench :)
 
#6
I can relate to some of that.

The most annoying thing to happen to me, and it has only happened once!
After using my RCBS combo i drain the powder using the side chute, but after it's first use i forgot to close it, i rocked up the next time, poured in my powder, and out it flooded onto the kitchen worktop, the floor, and every little crevice it could find.

Cheers

Richard
 

.25-06

Well-Known Member
#7
Once you get the load right keep a dummy round of it for comparison.
Marker pen can write load data on the side of the case.
Keep a journal of each step for each batch of rounds.
 

Ray7756

Well-Known Member
#9
I can relate to some of that.

The most annoying thing to happen to me, and it has only happened once!
After using my RCBS combo i drain the powder using the side chute, but after it's first use i forgot to close it, i rocked up the next time, poured in my powder, and out it flooded onto the kitchen worktop, the floor, and every little crevice it could find.

Cheers

Richard
Been there done that

Ray
 

hybridfiat

Well-Known Member
#11
I remember advice from my first reloading book given to me by my parents aged 17 (1977). It said: DO NOT line up your FLR cases and put new primers in the empty case in prep for priming then tip primer into your hand and prime. Because if you forget that there is one in there and prime it and fill with powder, seat a bullet and shoot it, your gun detonates! Pics provided.
I have not noticed any changes in pressure from seating bullets deeper in the case. On the contrary, if you seat a bullet further out and it is pushed into the lands (rifling) pressures will be considerably higher.
 

Mr. Gain

Well-Known Member
#12
Aside from distractions, the worst thing is being in a hurry. IME no statement is more often untrue than "I'll just load a quick 20 rounds..."

Hurrying on from one stage to the next will mean you don't check properly: for example, that all the primers are seated correctly, or that all the cases have a single charge in them.

A few months ago I changed over from re-sizing/de-priming before cleaning the brass to simply de-priming (you can see where this is going!). The nice, clean brass then went into a box.

The next time I came to load for the rifle in question I primed and charged all 50 cases then started seating the bullets.

Fortunately, I measure each one as I take it out of the press, and of course the OALs were all over the place as the bullets slipped deeper into the cases under pressure of the caliper.

It was at this point that I noticed a scrap of paper in the bottom of the punnet I had tipped the cases into before starting to work with them. I picked it up and turned it over and it said "CASES NOT RE-SIZED! RE-SIZE BEFORE LOADING!!! Evidently I had seen this one coming when I put the cases in the box, but a bit of haste to get started, and probably still having my thoughts on the last thing I had been doing and not on the job in hand had caused me to miss my own reminder.

Needless to say, this mistake pretty much doubled the time the job should have taken.

BTW, when pulling bullets, for ease/speed a press-mounted collet-type puller really is the answer: you can pull bullets in a fraction of the time, and with a fraction of the effort. I only use my inertia/impact puller when I'm working with very short, steeply-tapered bullets that the collet won't grip.

Re. pressure, both seating deeper and seating against the lands will increase pressures, so work out where you want the bullet to be first and then work up to where you want to be as regards accuracy/velocity within your pressure limit. If you are comfortably under this limit when you decide you want to seat a bit deeper you will be fine. If you are close to the limit and decide to seat a lot deeper, you may not be.
 

Sauer90

Well-Known Member
#13
I have not noticed any changes in pressure from seating bullets deeper in the case. On the contrary, if you seat a bullet further out and it is pushed into the lands (rifling) pressures will be considerably higher.

Seriously?

Amazing the dangerous advise given here.
 

jcampbellsmith

Well-Known Member
#14
T...I'm open to anything you can add to make me safer on this, which is why I post my mistakes along the journey, it's all about trying to learn to be as safe and accurate as possible.
I would recommend that you don't use metric measurements at all. Given the American leadership on all things reloading, inches still rule. Secondly, write down everything that you do in a notebook.

Regards JCS
 
#17
Aside from distractions, the worst thing is being in a hurry. IME no statement is more often untrue than "I'll just load a quick 20 rounds..."
Yup, always trying to make time so I don't have to do part of a job. That said, I deprime and then clean in the ultrasonic before going on to resizing and, like you, I put a big sticker on the box so that I know what's in there. Let's hope I don't make the same mistake you did.... place your bets now :)
 
#20
I'll add my latest one.

If it seems like the primers are a very loose fit in the pockets, it could be because they are a loose fit in the pockets. Whilst you may think 'they'll be OK', they probably won't be. They may in fact fall out later, for example when chambering at the range, and be a bugger to retrieve from the rotary internal magazine. Stick to brass with good primer pockets.
 

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