Another post about that coppery stuff

caberslash

Well-Known Member
Groups are one thing, but I've never seen any game stand stone still waiting to be fired at again in the exact same spot.

Ballistics gel or worse still, firing into a water tank, isn't a good demonstration of how well a bullet works either.

Copper bullets are usually quite accurate out of a factory rifle firing factory ammunition, but don't expect the same performance in terms of expansion if you aim at the same place as traditional bullets.

Aim at the hard bones in the front half of the animal. Have attached my recommended shot placement for copper bullets. Decent margin for error and if your bullet hits the 'X' the deer will usually drop dead or not go far.

Screenshot_20210527-140100_eBay-min.jpg

I think the Best Practise guides need a bit of an update as theirs still recommends the vital organs behind the front ribs, which make sense with a traditional 'cup and core' expanding/fragmenting bullet:

culling_roe_target.jpg

The difference is that most of the cooper bullets coming into the UK are designed for the larger deer species, even then it's still a good idea to aim into the bigger bones which in turn fragment on impact and destroy the vital internal organs much like a traditional bullet would. Miss a front rib on the way in and your bullet might just pencil through the lungs. Very risky on smaller deer.

With correct placement and at shorter distances, copper bullets can drop and animal faster than a cup and core, but shot placement must be very specific (other than a head shot). Most of the time an animal either won't give you much of an opportunity to aim so finely or that area of the neck/shoulder junction or it might be obscured by foliage, so practise is a must.

These are just my findings.
 

Steff

Well-Known Member
Groups are one thing, but I've never seen any game stand stone still waiting to be fired at again in the exact same spot.

Ballistics gel or worse still, firing into a water tank, isn't a good demonstration of how well a bullet works either.

Copper bullets are usually quite accurate out of a factory rifle firing factory ammunition, but don't expect the same performance in terms of expansion if you aim at the same place as traditional bullets.

Aim at the hard bones in the front half of the animal. Have attached my recommended shot placement for copper bullets. Decent margin for error and if your bullet hits the 'X' the deer will usually drop dead or not go far.

View attachment 207943

I think the Best Practise guides need a bit of an update as theirs still recommends the vital organs behind the front ribs, which make sense with a traditional 'cup and core' expanding/fragmenting bullet:

View attachment 207944

The difference is that most of the cooper bullets coming into the UK are designed for the larger deer species, even then it's still a good idea to aim into the bigger bones which in turn fragment on impact and destroy the vital internal organs much like a traditional bullet would. Miss a front rib on the way in and your bullet might just pencil through the lungs. Very risky on smaller deer.

With correct placement and at shorter distances, copper bullets can drop and animal faster than a cup and core, but shot placement must be very specific (other than a head shot). Most of the time an animal either won't give you much of an opportunity to aim so finely or that area of the neck/shoulder junction or it might be obscured by foliage, so practise is a must.

These are just my findings.
Your suggested point-of-aim has always been my preference. Even with common cup/core bullets. Especially on wild boar this came in handy as they just woudn’t run off with this sort of shot.
 

caberslash

Well-Known Member
Your suggested point-of-aim has always been my preference. Even with common cup/core bullets. Especially on wild boar this came in handy as they just woudn’t run off with this sort of shot.

Helps if you nick the inside/underside of the spine in the chest cavity as well!
 

LuckyEddie

Well-Known Member
Anybody got results of copper bullets on sika?
I understand they can be hard to put down with traditional lead ammo, but it’ll be interesting to see if there’s any difference with copper ammo.
 

Cranborne

Well-Known Member
1st roe buck shot with Fox 123gn in my 6.5x55 tonight. I thought I'd missed it the way it ran; dropped dead after about 50 yards in standing wheat, with a normal engine room shot. I'll go for your suggested point of aim next time @caberslash. Glad I had a dog with me.
 

caberslash

Well-Known Member
1st roe buck shot with Fox 123gn in my 6.5x55 tonight. I thought I'd missed it the way it ran; dropped dead after about 50 yards in standing wheat, with a normal engine room shot. I'll go for your suggested point of aim next time @caberslash. Glad I had a dog with me.

Was he a decent buck?

Real problems happen with poor yearlings/followers, if you miss a rib and get a pinhole then your problems have just started.

For those starting new I only recommend the faster chamberings like .243 (yes, I know there is a lot of doom and gloom about this one and copper, especially in Scotland, but it will change, hopefully...), .270 and even some guys using 25-06 have had good results when shooting in the right spot.

Guys in NZ are shooting red stags with 50 grain copper .224 bullets out of .222/.223... go firgure!
 

dunwater

Well-Known Member
Anybody got results of copper bullets on sika?
I understand they can be hard to put down with traditional lead ammo, but it’ll be interesting to see if there’s any difference with copper ammo.
They die.
Main difference to traditional bullets is increased penetration with similar weights.
 

Foxyboy43

Well-Known Member
Groups are one thing, but I've never seen any game stand stone still waiting to be fired at again in the exact same spot.

Ballistics gel or worse still, firing into a water tank, isn't a good demonstration of how well a bullet works either.

Copper bullets are usually quite accurate out of a factory rifle firing factory ammunition, but don't expect the same performance in terms of expansion if you aim at the same place as traditional bullets.

Aim at the hard bones in the front half of the animal. Have attached my recommended shot placement for copper bullets. Decent margin for error and if your bullet hits the 'X' the deer will usually drop dead or not go far.

View attachment 207943

I think the Best Practise guides need a bit of an update as theirs still recommends the vital organs behind the front ribs, which make sense with a traditional 'cup and core' expanding/fragmenting bullet:

View attachment 207944

The difference is that most of the cooper bullets coming into the UK are designed for the larger deer species, even then it's still a good idea to aim into the bigger bones which in turn fragment on impact and destroy the vital internal organs much like a traditional bullet would. Miss a front rib on the way in and your bullet might just pencil through the lungs. Very risky on smaller deer.

With correct placement and at shorter distances, copper bullets can drop and animal faster than a cup and core, but shot placement must be very specific (other than a head shot). Most of the time an animal either won't give you much of an opportunity to aim so finely or that area of the neck/shoulder junction or it might be obscured by foliage, so practise is a must.

These are just my findings.
Timely advice for me thank you. I will hopefully put it into practice this very afternoon.
🦊🦊
 

mike308

Well-Known Member
I don't take the traditional heart lung shot with copper bullets anymore, had too many runners. High shoulder everyone now most drop on the spot even Sika. Close range neck.
 
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