Any builders?

Pete E

Well-Known Member
I'm hoping to lay on water and drainage to a small outbuilding later in the summer.

The problem is that the building is made from pre cast concrete sections.
Does anybody know if these can be drilled with out the whole section cracking? I would need to drill a 2" to 3" hole through the 2" thick wall section but I'm not sure if its feasable to do...I was thinking that perhaps there is a special hole "cutter" whuch might be suitable?

Regards,

Peter
 

the scudd

Well-Known Member
hi pete go to your local plant hire depot and ask for a core drill of whatever diameter you want,just make sure to tell them it,s for cutting through concrete,you wont have any problems with cracks.
the scudd
 

downwind

Well-Known Member
Pete, you shouldn't have too much trouble as long as you don't hit the reinforcing steel in the concrete. As the scudd says, you can hire core drills to drill those sizes, alternatively, mark the size of hole(big enough for pipe lagging), drill a series of smaller holes(8 or 10mm) around the circumference and tap out the centre with a chisel. Make sure to protect your water and waste pipe where they go through the concrete(pipe lagging & silicone) Have fun, Pete.
PS Core drills DO NOT LIKE RE-BAR :evil:
 

Pete E

Well-Known Member
Thanks...just as well I asked as it never occurred to me that the sections contained reinforcing bar! :eek:

Its not a job thats on the cards immediately, but if I'm going to put a sink in, I will have to take into account its possible location with regards some other work I am doing...

Regards,

Peter
 

Pete E

Well-Known Member
Downwind,

I didn't put the slab down but I think the guy who did built some sort of nuclear shelter under it! I once had to cut a couple of holes in it for something else and I swear the concrete was a good 6" thick! Since then, I have added a "skim" of another couple of inches inside the building to level the floor off and seal the bottom of the panels ect..

If its feasible, the walls would certainly be eaiser...

Regards,

Peter
 

shootingduckdog

Well-Known Member
core drills

If you go the core drill route be aware some plant hire firms charge by the day plus wear. If you whack rebar the wear could really cost. :eek:
 

downwind

Well-Known Member
Pete E said:
Downwind,

I didn't put the slab down but I think the guy who did has some sort of nuclear shelter under it! I once had to cut a couple of holes in it for something else and I swear the concrete was a good 6" thick! Since then, I have added a "skim" of another couple of inches inside the building to level the floor off and seal the bottom of the panels ect..

If its feasible, the walls would certainly be eaiser...

Regards,

Peter
That being the case, go for the wall, just try to keep away from the joints where the sections butt together. Cheers, Pete.
 

downwind

Well-Known Member
Re: core drills

shootingduckdog said:
If you go the core drill route be aware some plant hire firms charge by the day plus wear. If you whack rebar the wear could really cost. :eek:
Yea, and catch it wrong with a big SDS drill and you might not be able to hold your rifle for a day or two :cry: :cry: Cheers, Pete.
 

Turfer

Well-Known Member
Try giving the panel you intend to drill the once over with a sparks conduit locator, it should show the locations of the rebar if they aren't to deep set. That way you can work out where to drill with the core drill and not hit any metal.

Personally I'd go for the multiple small hole option that way you can put the hole where you want it and not where you are forced to by the rebar positions.All you do is drill around them knock out the concrete and either cut the rebar with a hacksaw or small grinder.

Good luck and mind your knuckles. :lol:
 

Pete E

Well-Known Member
Thanks again Gents,

I'm beginning to wonder if a large bucket under the sink might not be the easier option! :eek:

Regards,

Peter
 

Turfer

Well-Known Member
Re: diamond cutters

widows son said:
stuff the multi hole bit hit it with a hammer a shatter the whole panel , if it weak at all .

Robert

You drill the holes so that they over lap.That way there's no need to get busy with the lump hammer. A light tap with a tack hammers all you need to finish the job. ;)
 

Pete E

Well-Known Member
Turfer said:
Pete

One of these might be an easy solution to all of your installation problems. it allows you to get away with using a standard 32mm waste.

http://www.saniflo.co.uk/SANIVITE.aspx

I am sure it would work, but the sink is only going to be in an outbuilding I hang and butcher the odd deer in...I wouldn't even use the term "larder" as its nothing that grand...

roedoecarcass010.jpg


Basically, I want to make it a bit more hygienic without the costs getting out of all proportion...

Regards,

Peter
 

kuwinda

Well-Known Member
Looks like you have 'Marley' type panels - usually these are reinforced with small diameter (2-3mm) high tensile wires which are sometimes pre-stressed. I would'nt have thought you'd have too much trouble either stitch drilling or core cutting through provided you stick to the middle of the panel.

I have a similar set up in my garage but just leave the water outside and run in a hose with the 'squirter' trigger thingy on the end and my big carcase tray underneath to catch the run-off. When skinning and butchering I can leave skin and bits to drop into the tray.

Its does'nt work overnight in the summer though and I have to butcher beasts immediately. Need to get a fridge.
 

Pete E

Well-Known Member
Tufter,

Still too grand! Think large bucket! :lol: :lol:

Kuwinda,

The building is by Lidget, and I suppose the best thing to do is give them a ring and see what they say...

There no water at all in there at the minute nor any I would say was convienently near-by and it is a pain is the a55 at times...

Your right about the fridge, it really does make things much easier..I got the small one below from ebay for under £60 delivered, and even one of that small size has been a boon.
roedoecarcass009.jpg


It started playing up a bit a couple of weeks ago although its seems to have settled down again now..I suspect the stat didn't like the really cold temps inside the outbuilding..I'm on the look out for something a bit bigger, possibly a drinks chiller cabinet, but I've heard mixed reports on just how well they work..

Regards,

Peter
 

Turfer

Well-Known Member
Pete

Why not go the whole hog and have two buckets one for you and one for the knives and saw? :p

Commercial ice cream freezers work far better than drink chillers as they are capable of bring the cabinet temp down lower in a much shorter time..
 

kuwinda

Well-Known Member
I have looked a few times on ebay and in Scot-ads for suitable fridges but so far no luck.

(The annoying thing is that I know the coca cola type ones are dished out for free when a shop/bar takes on a contract and then are left by the drinks company when they are getting a bit grotty - why are there not dozens of them around?)

I have heard also of folks using a freezer on a time clock - it would really need to be a vertical one though.

Anyone else got any bright ideas?
 
Top