Any idea what these are?

Tonup

Member
These came in a box with a Lee crimp die which I purchased second hand.
They clearly aren't part of that.
They are made from high quality or hardened steel. The interior bore is 0.487"
The pin which protrudes into the bore on the black piece has a finely machined end, is adjustable and set slightly tangentially to the bore.
They look firearmy (if that's not a word it ought to be)
Any clue what they are part of?


308 case for reference

Cheers guys

Tim
 

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enfieldspares

Well-Known Member
You lucky, lucky man! They are Forster items. And are to outside neck turn cases. The part that screws in is the adjustable cutter. The knurled part is the part that limits the travel of the cut and the only two things that you are missing (as its calibre sensitive) is the relevant inside neck pilot and for all use of the tool the metal finger that works in conjunction with that knurled travel limiter. I had one and can't recall if I still do. But here's a man with a long beard on You Tube showing how it works. Folks on her might go on about Sinclair. But Forster are by far the better mousetrap in IMHO.

 

Yorric

Well-Known Member
Thanks Enfield Tim showed me it yesterday and I guessed it was a trimmer. He has the cam follower strip so just needs the pilot, plus a Forster trimmer body. Knowing him and his good luck he will find one for peanuts!
Ian
 

enfieldspares

Well-Known Member
I've a couple of the bases for a Forster I've been trying to sell for ages. I only shoot .270 and .30-06 nowadays so I've a short and a medium base surplus. But, of course that is the bases only not the gubbins that then attaches onto the top of it.
 

Tonup

Member
Thank gents.
I am enlightened.
Now my next question,
Is neck turning a worthwhile exercise?

Cheers

Tim
 

Yorric

Well-Known Member
Tim as your 308 rifle already shoots 1/2 MOA with gash ammo I'd say not for that one. Who knows for your Creedmore??? Again prolly not as you only usually shoot out to 600 yards.

Ian
 

enfieldspares

Well-Known Member
Is neck turning a worthwhile exercise?
Inside neck reaming yes, does have a point especially, say, if doing cartridge conversions. Say .308 Winchester to .44 Auto Mag. Or some .44 Magnum to .44 S & W Russian if they've a high inside web. But I've never seen the point of it for us reloading fired cases as stalkers or shooting service rifles out to 500/600 yards or, in truth, even 1,000 yards.

Supposedly, at least I think, you are supposed to neck turn the case after it has been sized on the outside. Then fire it and then, after that, neck turn on the inside to the diameter of your bullet. Thus I understand you get a uniform thickness neck that is the same thickness all around AND so gives (after the inside turning has been done) gives a consistent neck tension.

Personally I cannot for stalkers and or service rifle shooters as detailed above see any sensible reason. Taking the time you'd use to do all this rigamarole and instead practising standing or off sticks shots with an air rifle at six yards will serve the deer better in getting a well placed clean killing shot than any neck turning will.
 

Tonup

Member
Inside neck reaming yes, does have a point especially, say, if doing cartridge conversions. Say .308 Winchester to .44 Auto Mag. Or some .44 Magnum to .44 S & W Russian if they've a high inside web. But I've never seen the point of it for us reloading fired cases as stalkers or shooting service rifles out to 500/600 yards or, in truth, even 1,000 yards.

Supposedly, at least I think, you are supposed to neck turn the case after it has been sized on the outside. Then fire it and then, after that, neck turn on the inside to the diameter of your bullet. Thus I understand you get a uniform thickness neck that is the same thickness all around AND so gives (after the inside turning has been done) gives a consistent neck tension.

Personally I cannot for stalkers and or service rifle shooters as detailed above see any sensible reason. Taking the time you'd use to do all this rigamarole and instead practising standing or off sticks shots with an air rifle at six yards will serve the deer better in getting a well placed clean killing shot than any neck turning will.
Thanks. I feel a for sale post coming on.

Tim
 

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