Any suggestions as to what this may be

SikaHunter

Well-Known Member
I came across this while butchering some rabbits I shot over the last few days. I would guess at tapeworm cyst but it appeared to come from the loin while I was removing the leg. it is approximately 1 1/2 inches by 1 inch and filled with fluid and has some small seed like particles in it. The rabbit was in fine form and enjoying the sun until he met me.

Any of you have any suggestions as to what it may be.

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SikaHunter

Well-Known Member
Ok thanks for the info. I dumped the carcass but not sure if I needed to do so. What is the general opinion on that?
 

uptonogood

Well-Known Member
Call me fussy if you like but I’d condemn the lot .Surely there are more healthy specimens about to eat .Always fascinate and repulses at same time why folk say a carcass is ok to cut off an infected limb 🤮when abnormalities are found .I couldn’t face anything iffy myself and would find a decent specimen to eat or put into food chain .
 

Buchan

Well-Known Member
I just notice he thumbsed up it.
Yes tapeworm cyst, 2 potential culprits. Taenia pisiformis and Taenia serialis. The risk to humans is small to negligible, even if you ate them, the tapeworm would develop in your gut and have little impact. The biugger risk is ingesting the eggs form dog or fox poo and that cyst you've seen developing in you.

Despite me understnading this, I don't eat them!
 

C h r i s

Well-Known Member
Nice. Never seen that in a rabbit round here, but will double check everything from now on. Was it attached to tissue/muscle or did it just fall out when skinned?
 

shakey jake

Well-Known Member
i find them fairly often in areas with high rabbit numbers that havent been controlled for a while, you can normally feel them when handling the rabbit before gutting feels like an abnormal lump. ive seen them on the back, front and back legs.
any body know what happens to them after this stage? do they rupture through the skin?
ive allways understood cooking the rabbit would make them safe but not sure i could then tuck in!
 

C h r i s

Well-Known Member
Some interesting reading here, whch should be relevant to wild Rabbits in the UK.

DNR - Cysticercosis.

"Two species of tapeworms are involved. Larvae (tapeworm cysts) of Taenia pisiformis are most commonly seen in cottontail rabbits. They occur less frequently in snowshoe hares. The fluid-filled cysts are about 5 to 7 mm in diameter, occur singly and are attached to the surface of the liver, intestines and occasionally the lungs. Each cyst holds a white floating object which is the head (called the scolex) of an immature tapeworm.

A second tapeworm cyst primarily seen in snowshoe hares, but also reported to occur occasionally in cottontail rabbits, is the larval stage of Multiceps serialis. These fluid-filled cysts differ from those of T. pisiformis in that they are larger, elongate and each contains many white floating objects (tapeworm heads). They are located under the skin or between muscle layers rather than inside the body cavity. Clusters of cysts resemble water blisters, hence the term "blisters" which the condition is sometimes called."
 

uptonogood

Well-Known Member
I’ve found whole tapeworm from one end the other in rabbits in the past ,always thought it was high densities but shot one while back that had a cyst on its back and numbers here are very small now after several years of VHD .
An area i shoot did have good numbers and I was going to freeze a load for dog food but almost over night they are gone ?
 

25 Sharps

Well-Known Member
I’ve found whole tapeworm from one end the other in rabbits in the past ,always thought it was high densities but shot one while back that had a cyst on its back and numbers here are very small now after several years of VHD .
An area i shoot did have good numbers and I was going to freeze a load for dog food but almost over night they are gone ?
My numbers have dropped off a cliff recently
 

dunwater

Well-Known Member
Tapeworms are pretty much endemic in rabbits, it’s why you shouldn’t feed them raw to your dogs.
 

crowe

Well-Known Member
Always good to mention the worm burden of rabbits to sheep and horse owners - both spend money worming their animals and letting them know can help you pick up some ground on occasion 👍
 
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