Any Suggestions on Stock Repair

Legolas

Well-Known Member
I've got quite a split in the stock of my 308. Its fairly deep and I was wonderinng if anyone had any suggestions about the best way to repair it. I've thought about either inserting a pin and glueing/clamping or otherwise removing the offending split piece altogether and making an insert. Replavcement M591 stocks seem to be like hens teeth so if I can repair it I would prefer to do so.







Thanks
 

pietasvenatores

Well-Known Member
It's due to poor bedding and excessive contact points, the action and/or screws + bottom metal slamming the stock during recoil. That along with kiln dried wood, but we all know about factory stock wood issues of course.

Personally, doing stock repairs daily, I would drill a hole under the crack, fill it with a special ingredient, then clamp it, I would then relieve the inlet areas where excessive contact is, and glass bed the rifle or at least the front and back + the trigger guard areas. I would then proceed to re-oil finish the stock to cover the crack as much as possible, and hope that it just lasts like that for many years to come, which it probably will.
 

Chasey

Well-Known Member
Thats a very fine crack to repair. I am guessing thats a hole for screwing in the action to the stock?

You could block the bottom of the hole and use it as a resevwar filling it with CB10T Slow Set epoxy crack injecting resin Leave it to seep into the crack the once set re drill the mounting hole

The company for CB10T is Property Repair Systems in Tignmouth Dorset Repairing Structural Timbers using epoxy resins

Phone David Moore and ask for some advice

The cracks we do are usualy bigger :D The resin bond (resin used to glue in oak slivers) is stronger than the origional beam

Thin cracks down to 1mm we just inject with the CB10T. It is truley amazing the cracks it will penetrate



 

Hornet 6

Well-Known Member
I have had good success twisting the stock to open the crack, and then smearing waterproof PVA glue deep in to the crack.
I would follow that with bedding the front of the action as a minimum and inserting a pillar.

Neil. :)
 

pietasvenatores

Well-Known Member
Better to drill a wee tunnel and push the glue out from the inside, you then know it's completely filled and no twisting of the stock with an existing crack:scared:
 

Legolas

Well-Known Member
Thank you for the all the information so far gents, much appreciated. Is the pillar and bedding something a quite competant DIY'er can do at home or is specialist kit required? Failing that it might be time to talk to a professional and get it done properly.
 

Chasey

Well-Known Member
Thank you for the all the information so far gents, much appreciated. Is the pillar and bedding something a quite competant DIY'er can do at home or is specialist kit required? Failing that it might be time to talk to a professional and get it done properly.

Plenty of how to vids on youtube for bedding.

Watch the vid and decide if its for you

If you go down the drill and inject rout then PRS do injection nozels for the CB10T

ATB
 

pietasvenatores

Well-Known Member
Thank you for the all the information so far gents, much appreciated. Is the pillar and bedding something a quite competant DIY'er can do at home or is specialist kit required? Failing that it might be time to talk to a professional and get it done properly.
Bedding is not all that difficult but there is a strict set of rules you must follow to get it right. If you get it wrong and you can't separate the action from the stock or the bedding job isn't holding the action properly, then it's going to be a b!tch to have re-done as you will probably want to remove all the 'old' bedding material before starting over, or worst case, smash up the stock to peel the bits off the action!

I'd say, if you are great at DIY and crafts and you don't need the rifle to look great, give it a go. If you want it done right and the stock re-done well, and know it's going to be a good job, but are willing to pay for it, give me or any other's on here that do such work a shout.
 
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tiffl

Member
Hi,

Try this gunsmith in the Midlands, he is great with stock work and especially rifles.

R J Blackwall

Tel: 01608811319
Location: Charlbury, Oxfordshire, England
 

Muir

Well-Known Member
I had a similar cracks in the stock of my 8x57 Husqvarna. I drove small steel pins into the crack to widen it and injected accraglass epoxy -the old variety, not the gel. When I got in as much as I could i pulled the pins and lightly clamped the action across the repaired area to squeeze out excess. It took a few sessions. When done and cleaned up, I glass bedded rifle, top and bottom,with accraglass gel. Four years later and still working fine.~Muir
 

SDC7x57

Well-Known Member
I'd suggest a visit to John Wardman at 'The Gun Room' at Holme Upon Spalding Moor (near Pocklington). John has done a number of repairs and modification for me over the years and his work with wood is top class and sensibly priced. Some of the repairs he has done for me are TOTALLY invisible.
 

pigeonbasher

Well-Known Member
I have a tikka 595? walnut stock for sale, don't know if it will fit, ive sent (legolas) a pm yesterday but as yet had no reply, atb ray
 

Coolhand

Well-Known Member
I have had success repairing small hairline cracks in all manner of timber using SUPER GLUE, the Loctite Brand 406. I use a hair dryer to warm up the area and then put on a few drops of glue, you will see the glue start to migrate along the cracks and more often than not find areas which you could not previously see. Allow to thoroughly dry and sand back.
Having said that, I am not sure that this method would be the best choice for the cracked stock depicted in this post.

regards
Mike.
 

Legolas

Well-Known Member
Thanks for all the feedback folks. I've injected resin into the cracks this morning and the stock is clamped up - we'll see how it goes eh?
 

Legolas

Well-Known Member
Ok, as a complete novice when it comes to how rifles are put together I had a penny drop moment today as the result of a very kind chap from the PW forum who sent me a stock for a m595 to help me out. the stock came complete with a separate L shaped recoil lug, which my original stock was missing, I had no idea it should have one.. Obviously hence the cracks !!!!! I've made a start on the original stock and the new 595 stock will take a bit of fettling but I'm sure I can make it fit. Ideally I'd like to getboth stocks in to good order and possibly increase the length of pull on one for use with my no set up, does anyone know if it's possible to still get spare recoil lugs for a rifle of this age?
 

kimh

Well-Known Member
It's due to poor bedding and excessive contact points, the action and/or screws + bottom metal slamming the stock during recoil. That along with kiln dried wood, but we all know about factory stock wood issues of course.

Personally, doing stock repairs daily, I would drill a hole under the crack, fill it with a special ingredient, then clamp it, I would then relieve the inlet areas where excessive contact is, and glass bed the rifle or at least the front and back + the trigger guard areas. I would then proceed to re-oil finish the stock to cover the crack as much as possible, and hope that it just lasts like that for many years to come, which it probably will.
Agree, you have to be a consultant not the doctor? treat the cause not the symptom, the wood will tell you?
 

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