Anybody can make a mistake

bewsher500

Well-Known Member
#2
anyone stupid enough to keep one in the chamber in an unholstered firearm whilst trying to put it in a pocket one handed whilst holding a cake in an elevator......

yes I agree.....
 

8x57

Distinguished Member
#3
Cobblers, what's the point of carrying an empty gun if it's for defence.

It does make you wonder about the safety system though and why he should decide to move the pistol from his pocket and reholster it when in the lift and with one hand already occupied.. Can't be sure from the video but it looks like one of the smaller Glock's or possibly a one of the plastic fantastic Smith & Wesson pistols. Incidentally the other shooting reported last week where a 2 year old accidently shot his mother in a supermarket after accessing her concealed carry pistol involved one of the modern Smith & Wesson pistols.


Edit that. He moved the pistol from his holster to the pocket not the other way around.
 
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bewsher500

Well-Known Member
#4
Cobblers, what's the point of carrying an empty gun if it's for defence.
if the safety doesn't stop it going off when dropped...I would say the point is not accidentally shooting yourself or others....
at least he shot himself and not his wife/girlfriend/partner/friend.
 

8x57

Distinguished Member
#5
Though not a great fan of trigger safety systems as fitted on the pistols that I mentioned, much preferring a separate safety myself (as on Browning/Colt), in this instance I think the problem was user related thus nothing more or less complicated than a ND. Fortunately the only person hurt is the actual user and hopefully it will be his pride that will be hurting more than any physical injury.
I dare say that you could say that a degree of complacency was involved, so a lesson to us all in a way, as we all become complacent at some time.
 

Mr. Gain

Well-Known Member
#6
Edit that. He moved the pistol from his holster to the pocket not the other way around.
Oh, no: he transitioned it.

I think that something professional operators do. :rolleyes:

Having said that...

Familiarity > complacency = any of us.
 

Pedro

Well-Known Member
#8
I think that with the majority of accidents, whether it be a ND, cutting yourself with a knife, falling off ladders or whatever, you can look back on after and identify something that you did that in hindsight was stupid. (The others are mainly equipment failures.) You may be the safest person in the world normally, but something, whether it's being distracted, thinking about what to do next, what's for tea, is the wife leaving me etc. causes this stupid thing to happen. It's what is called the human condition.

Of course God makes these things happen so that people on websites such as this one can condemn you as a bumbling, unsafe buffoon, unfit for normal society. As if the shock of a firearm going off unexpectedly, the injury, the pain, the loss of bits of your body, or worse someone else's isn't enough.

Right, off to put the kettle on....:)
 

LuckyEddie

Well-Known Member
#9
I think that with the majority of accidents, whether it be a ND, cutting yourself with a knife, falling off ladders or whatever, you can look back on after and identify something that you did that in hindsight was stupid. (The others are mainly equipment failures.) You may be the safest person in the world normally, but something, whether it's being distracted, thinking about what to do next, what's for tea, is the wife leaving me etc. causes this stupid thing to happen. It's what is called the human condition.

Of course God makes these things happen so that people on websites such as this one can condemn you as a bumbling, unsafe buffoon, unfit for normal society. As if the shock of a firearm going off unexpectedly, the injury, the pain, the loss of bits of your body, or worse someone else's isn't enough.

Right, off to put the kettle on....:)
Well said that man
 

howa243

Well-Known Member
#10
I think that with the majority of accidents, whether it be a ND, cutting yourself with a knife, falling off ladders or whatever, you can look back on after and identify something that you did that in hindsight was stupid. (The others are mainly equipment failures.) You may be the safest person in the world normally, but something, whether it's being distracted, thinking about what to do next, what's for tea, is the wife leaving me etc. causes this stupid thing to happen. It's what is called the human condition.

Of course God makes these things happen so that people on websites such as this one can condemn you as a bumbling, unsafe buffoon, unfit for normal society. As if the shock of a firearm going off unexpectedly, the injury, the pain, the loss of bits of your body, or worse someone else's isn't enough.

Right, off to put the kettle on....:)

This is the reason I posted the story. There are some that think that mistakes don't happen (no such thing as an accidental discharge only negligent ones), but I think mistakes do just happen.
 

Pedro

Well-Known Member
#11
This is the reason I posted the story. There are some that think that mistakes don't happen (no such thing as an accidental discharge only negligent ones), but I think mistakes do just happen.
+ 1.

Actually accepting one is less than perfect and these things can happen is a good thing in reducing their likelihood.
 

Wingy

Well-Known Member
#16
Wow! good job this wasn't a British armed cop or he would have been judged, guilty of everything, living in a world where accidents are not aloud to happen, incompetent, thrown in prison etc, etc, by the usual SD judge & jury. What a difference in attitude when it happens on the other side of the water
Wingy
 

Neumo

Well-Known Member
#17
As has been said, the modern autos have a trigger safety which has many advantages but one of the downsides is that if you get something caught in the trigger guard as it is being put away then you can get an ND. It is not unknown in the Glock world and what he did here looks like another example of it. He should have known better & paid the price for it.

Why anyone would think that doing any kind of weapons handling inside a lift, let alone with your partner inside with you, would be a good idea....
 

8x57

Distinguished Member
#18
+1 Neumo.

I'm slightly puzzled by the logic of carrying the pistol while out and about in a holster yet moving to a coat pocket when returning home. Anyone have any idea about the possible thinking involved there????
 

teabag_46

Well-Known Member
#19
+1 Neumo.

I'm slightly puzzled by the logic of carrying the pistol while out and about in a holster yet moving to a coat pocket when returning home. Anyone have any idea about the possible thinking involved there????

Coat pockets are on the outside, holsters (CCW) would be inside (under) the coat. If threatened (mugging for instance) and you are told to empty your pockets.....
 

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