Article in Farmers Weekly...

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BLUEROLL

Well-Known Member
More than one farmer has said to me that they thought their TB infection rate has dropped since we started to reduce the Roe population.
 

dunwater

Well-Known Member
Thats been brewing for a long while, last meeting I was at 3 years ago, Wildlife refused point blank to even estimate the number of deer in the national park, figures for the county population were over 20 years old, a blind man with his head shoved up a pigs arse could tell you something stank.
Deer in the national park areas aren’t managed, never have been, and at a guess the population is up 3-400% over the last 15 years, TB rates in deer are running at 23% where tested, but routine testing only takes place in the core areas which are known hot spots. Most infected deer detected go unreported, why would you report it? The carcass will be condemned and you get to pay for disposal, far easier to drag it under a bush.
Ultimately, the deer in the park, heck, the deer in the whole county will have to be managed, but there’s huge resistance to allowing hunting within the park.
Its not just TB either, 70% damage on replant forestry isn’t unusual.
Maybe the farmers can force some action, the Green’s will just sit there wringing their little hands and spouting nonsense about wolf and lynx introductions.
 

dunwater

Well-Known Member
ISTM there's quite a lot of silence in that article about badgers.

There’s been a 3 way infection triangle, badgers, deer and cattle with no one knowing how it works, there’s been a lot of badger culling in the area which just leaves the Deer and the cows.
The cows won’t be culled unless they have TB, so the deer will have to go.
 

dunwater

Well-Known Member
I wonder what the statistics are of SD members finding signs of tb in deer we’ve shot?? I’ve never seen any sign of it in Roe... could be a project for someone??
If they’re anything like other deer then you get local “ hot spots “ , deer are very bad at isolating TB, once they get it it seems to progress rapidly in the animal.
 

kieran222

Well-Known Member
It all goes back to density of population, same with rabbits as soon as the numbers get high they get mixy.
 

teyhan1

Well-Known Member
This sort of article is utter rubbish.
Better to believe in science before spouting drivel.

Far more interesting is that the reply on an Irish website which contradicts this.


Sika deer coming under attack.
If it is not deer in general which is tried to be blamed for Tb in cattle, then it is Sika Deer and in particular in Wicklow.
A scapegoat has to be found.

The department's test culls of deer in areas of high incidents of TB infected cattle show clear evidence that it is not the deer which can be blamed for the TB outbrakes in cattle.
Please note:
In 2020 The Department of Agriculture tested 87 deer in regional veterinary laboratories (RVLs) for TB and only three tested positive for the disease, The deer tested were shot where there were local concerns about deer transmitting TB to cattle. The deer were specifically shot where farmers have a concern in that area that these deer are transmitting TB to cattle.
In 2020 there was quite a bit of concern in the Birr Castle area that deer could be responsible for TB outbreaks there. Forty deer were examined. Of those 40 deer none had TB.

In 2019 the Department tested 233 deer submitted to the RVLs and only two were positive for TB.
In Kerry in 2019 there were 120 deer tested for TB and none of those tested positive.

Deer not to be blamed for outbrakes of TB in cattle !

Farmers are ignoring basic biosecurity measures by not maintaining fences , by spreading potential contaminated manure and slury.
Some farmers are discharging, loosing manure along roads and laneways and contaminating these public highways during transport.
The department of agriculture is seemingly closing their eyes and doing nothing about it, but the department's test culls of deer in areas of high incidents of TB infected cattle show clear evidence that it is not the deer which can be blamed for the TB outbrakes in cattle.
 

dunwater

Well-Known Member
This sort of article is utter rubbish.
Better to believe in science before spouting drivel.

Far more interesting is that the reply on an Irish website which contradicts this.


Sika deer coming under attack.
If it is not deer in general which is tried to be blamed for Tb in cattle, then it is Sika Deer and in particular in Wicklow.
A scapegoat has to be found.

The department's test culls of deer in areas of high incidents of TB infected cattle show clear evidence that it is not the deer which can be blamed for the TB outbrakes in cattle.
Please note:
In 2020 The Department of Agriculture tested 87 deer in regional veterinary laboratories (RVLs) for TB and only three tested positive for the disease, The deer tested were shot where there were local concerns about deer transmitting TB to cattle. The deer were specifically shot where farmers have a concern in that area that these deer are transmitting TB to cattle.
In 2020 there was quite a bit of concern in the Birr Castle area that deer could be responsible for TB outbreaks there. Forty deer were examined. Of those 40 deer none had TB.

In 2019 the Department tested 233 deer submitted to the RVLs and only two were positive for TB.
In Kerry in 2019 there were 120 deer tested for TB and none of those tested positive.

Deer not to be blamed for outbrakes of TB in cattle !

Farmers are ignoring basic biosecurity measures by not maintaining fences , by spreading potential contaminated manure and slury.
Some farmers are discharging, loosing manure along roads and laneways and contaminating these public highways during transport.
The department of agriculture is seemingly closing their eyes and doing nothing about it, but the department's test culls of deer in areas of high incidents of TB infected cattle show clear evidence that it is not the deer which can be blamed for the TB outbrakes in cattle.
This situation has been brewing away quietly for at least 20 years, the real issue is that there are just too many deer in the region now. Measured loss of grass and fodder is about 40% in the core study area, plus the TB (and the area is a known infection hot spot). You can forget the TB figures for Birr and Kerry, not relevant, but we’re consistently being told we have 23% infection rates in the study area.
Effective deer control is virtually impossible, land holdings are small with complex boundaries often close to or enclosed by either the national park or commercial forestry plantations, all with different objectives and no coherent plan.
The IFA is focusing on the deer as vectors for disease, as competitors for available grazing and as a road safety issue, they want numbers down.
As for the fencing, the slurry spreading the lax animal security, you’re right, but no one is going to point that out or even try to police it, a lot of these guys are older generation or part time dry stock “farmers” that actually work as builders or contractors but hang on to small marginal holdings, it allows them to still call themselves “farmers”,
If it wasn’t for the EU they’d have gone bust years ago
 
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