As we get older

chill123

Well-Known Member
I have been reading Peter Scott's book "The eye of the storm" . In the book he quotes

"But there comes a time for some men when there 1st reaction ,
Even to a traditional quarry is to no longer kill. They reach a certain
Stage or age ,some sooner ,some later "

I have been hunting personally for the last 35 years , I still get excited before a weekend away stalking ( packing my bags 3 days before departure) . I now enjoy the quality of the stalk rather than just getting a deer on the ground . I also enjoy putting guests in the best places , and sharing in there success when it goes right . How as age affected you ?
 

mr_magicfingers

Well-Known Member
I'll be 50 this year, and only discovered hunting in the past 12 months. It's reintroduced me to time spent outdoors, the joy of learning new things and of spending time in 'nature'. This morning I was accompanying a very kind SD member who's invited me along on a few stalks near exmoor, a beautiful cold, clear, frosty morning, a walk and gentle conversation on stalking skills and, just as we were walking back to the car after an 'unsuccesful' but very enjoyable morning, there was a surprise deer taken.

I can safely say that I'm hooked on hunting (almost ironic as I was vegetarian for 25 years) and it's helped put me back on the hill, rediscovering the glory of the outdoors and learning a completely new set of skills. I perhaps don't have the lust for the hunt I might have had if I were 30 years younger, it's more about the place, the stalk and the environment. It's almost as though the chance to take a beast is secondary to everything else.

Maybe I'm just getting old ;)
 

Jagare

Well-Known Member
I look forward to the roe buck season every year and when it arrives I'm not all that bothered. Fallow deer, not bothered if i never shoot one as long as i live. I hunt moose a couple of times a year and its not my favorite thing to do.
I can still sit out all night after boar and a days mixed driven game i never turn down. I still really enjoy working the dogs whether its for roe or pheasants,ducks. I havebeen very lucky with my stalking over a very long time.
Rifles, shotguns, dogs and shooting its been a great time and much of it taken for granted. More to come i hope.
 

NigelM

Well-Known Member
I'm with you Chill. Used to be a super keen killer of pheasant, partridge, deer etc. After 15 years at it I now enjoy my habitat creation, conservation and working the dogs. I never shoot anymore when guests come to my days, I work the dogs with the beating line and make sure they get good sport. I do make an exception when it comes to flighting the teal in the evening which still gets me super excited. Got a dog for deer a couple of years ago. Just starting to come good now. Shot a Roe Doe this morning who ran into 2 acres of standing wheat before she dropped and I find myself more excited about the fantastic first real track the dog did than the cull itself.

Peter Scott was spot on.
 

Cootmeurer

Well-Known Member
As a Hunter Education instructor we teach that there are 6 distinct stages of hunting. Additionally, you can be at more than one stage for different quarry.
1st stage is "shooter" - I can honestly say I am past this stage for any game. Just turned down a chance to go to Mexico with friends for doves and ducks. They shot 300 in 2 hours, and that just does not appeal to me
2nd stage is limiting out - I am past this stage with most game, but I was clearly in this stage when I came over to hunt roe and then when I came back for sika/reds in the highlands
3rd stage is trophy stage - I think I blasted through this when young and spent little time in it.
4th stage is method stage - this is a stage that I am still in for big game and fish. I have a certain way that I want to do it, and success depends on this.
5th stage is Sportsman stage - I am here for waterfowl, I enjoy the dogs, the decoys, the friends, and the presence of waterfowl is just an added bonus. As a matter of fact, my pond right outside my window currently has 21 mallards sitting on it, and they have nothing to fear.
6th stage is the Giving Back stage. I am getting into this stage for waterfowl, especially with youth. I am far happier guiding a kid to his first duck and seeing the the joy. I am also here for small game, routinely allowing my students to come out and shoot on my farm, often walking along teaching without a gun in my hand. But I know I am not here with my deer. I don't let those kids come out and shoot my woods until dear season is closed for fear they will alter my deer movement
 

alberta boy

Well-Known Member
I have been reading Peter Scott's book "The eye of the storm" . In the book he quotes

"But there comes a time for some men when there 1st reaction ,
Even to a traditional quarry is to no longer kill. They reach a certain
Stage or age ,some sooner ,some later "

I have been hunting personally for the last 35 years , I still get excited before a weekend away stalking ( packing my bags 3 days before departure) . I now enjoy the quality of the stalk rather than just getting a deer on the ground . I also enjoy putting guests in the best places , and sharing in there success when it goes right . How as age affected you ?
Pretty much the same as you . I enjoy helping younger or more inexperienced hunters get an animal more than taking one myself . It's become more of a quality time with family and friends thing , than the need to take an animal . One of the SD members came out and hunted with us this last fall . I know it meant a lot to him , but to be honest , I think I enjoyed it more . He is a very experienced stalker and has become a life-long friend , with me and the rest of the clan . While he was here I got to see this place through his eyes and it made me remember how I felt when I first came here and went out into the bush with older and more seasoned men and women . As I get older I've come to understand what those people did for me and to appreciate the generosity , and patience , they showed me . It's all part of the big circle , now it's my turn to do the same for others as was done for me , and , IMHO , that's the way it should be . Life is good lol .

AB
 

Pedro

Well-Known Member
There are a lot of changes as we get older and I suspect many reflect roles of humans in pre-history.

As a young man we are driven to provide. That is to hunt and kill and the most important thing is bringing home the meat, therefore the kill is paramount. When we get older, gradually our offspring and other youngsters in our group assume that as a primary role and this becomes more of a secondary role as we take on more of a tutor/trainer role. We also take on more of a political role. Arranging, organising and ensuring those tasked with the killing do so in a sustainable way, thus maintaining game to be harvested into the future.

I suppose I see this most in my game shooting. Initially it was all about hitting that bird and as many as possible. Then it was more about working the dog to find those birds, or putting them over the guns. Now, I really enjoy offering days to others and watching them enjoy themselves. Of course, from time to time I still enjoy being on a peg and being in the zone. Perhaps that means I'm not quite past it just yet (or so I like to think).

All part of life's rich tapestry.
 

Woodsmoke

Well-Known Member
I think the famous quote from George VI says it all..............

'The wildlife of today is not ours to dispose of as we please. We have in in trust. We must account for it to those who come after....................'

I think all of us naturally reach a point where maturity sees us lose the 'bloodlust' & we start to take a on feeling of responsibility for the game that's given us so much over the years. I still love my shooting, but to be quite honest I don't think I'll be devastated when I reach the stage where 'enough's enough' and I get the chance to pass the torch on to 'those who come after' :)
 

paul o'

Well-Known Member
+1
with you on this and i feel the same now 55 yrs , i can sit out day or night and see wonderful things unfold around me and know its up to me if i reach for the gun or the camera. i'v been there done that and i hav't got the time to do it all over again ! but i do enjoy to watch new blood be embraced by all the types of shooting and hunting. :old:



I think the famous quote from George VI says it all..............

'The wildlife of today is not ours to dispose of as we please. We have in in trust. We must account for it to those who come after....................'

I think all of us naturally reach a point where maturity sees us lose the 'bloodlust' & we start to take a on feeling of responsibility for the game that's given us so much over the years. I still love my shooting, but to be quite honest I don't think I'll be devastated when I reach the stage where 'enough's enough' and I get the chance to pass the torch on to 'those who come after' :)
 

Muir

Well-Known Member
I am in my late 50's and I must admit I'm more patient and relaxed. It is odd that the hunting seems easier these days. I am patient and easy walking in the field, which puts me closer to a less nervous animal. I am 100% confident in my ability to walk an animal to ground and make the shot to put it in the freezer.

I wish I'd caught on to this years back. :rolleyes: ~Muir
 

norma 308

Well-Known Member
I think I'm right in saying Peter Scott in his former yrs shot huge amounts of wild fowl he probably just got fed up with it and found he could make more money painting :D
i think when you get older the step of youth and the blood lust leaves you Quality not quantity ,I want to shoot when I go stalking more importantly I want to see the quarry first you can't manage them if you've shot em all !
Norma
 

finnbear270

Well-Known Member
This year sees me in the last of my fifties, (Where the heck did that lot go???:eek:), I can concur with the general flow of the thread here, albeit I have shotguns with long resident spiders in them, :lol:, the rifle and anything to do with the discipline thereof, has my full attention. Hunting live quarry wether it be fish, fowl or fur will stay with me till I go to the happy hunting grounds.:tiphat:
 

sikamalc

Administrator
Site Staff
Being near the end of the 50 year range I can honestly say that the urge to kill is not the same as it used to be. I get more enjoyment in taking a novice out and taking their first deer, or watching my dog make a retrieve ( although Todd is also not as young as he used to be, but try telling him that!!)

Someone once said to me that at the age of 50, when you wake up in the morning and nothings hurts..................................your dead! :lol:

Quite a lot hurts when I wake up in the morning, especially me old knees, so I must still be alive :D And still living the dream as a friend said to me, so I consider myself a very lucky man in every respect.
 

Woodsmoke

Well-Known Member
Someone once said to me that at the age of 50, when you wake up in the morning and nothings hurts..................................your dead! :lol:
More advice on getting older:

Never pass up the opportunity to pee..................

If you get an erection, use it! Even if you're alone.................

Never trust a fart...............
 

EMcC

Well-Known Member
I'm in my seventies and have been through all the stages mentioned earlier.
The actual kill is an anti-climax but needs must when you want one for the table.
It does seem strange at times when I see what I have shot or killed and stand there and admire the way it is put together.
The way the colours don't run into each other like a mixed tub of coloured and non coloured clothing would.
The sharp lines and the vivid colours themselves, even rats have varying shades of brown from the top of it's body to it's underside.
Sometimes I wonder if there is something or someone 'in charge' and when my time comes will I be surrounded by all the animals, birds and fish that I have accounted for, asking me the question, why !

PS. I jolly well hope not or that will be a bit embarrassing :(
 
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basil

Distinguished Member
Though I don`t shoot now I quite often think of a conversation I had with my daughter ..
When I turned 50 ..
Aimee say`s `Dad, don`t you feel old now`?
Me. Nope .. when I can`t get out of bed, walk miles with the dogs, take a wildlife photo, have a laugh over something daft .. only then will I start to feel feel old.
There`s a lot of people out there that would love to be in our boots.
 

willowbank

Well-Known Member
I posted a while ago that since putting out numerous cameras I had become more interested in the daily lives and antics of the young Fallow than actually shooting them, Is that an age thing?

I am probably over the average age of stalker on here and the aches and pains are no doubt age related but I will still be a shooting man until they carry me out.

There,s a lot to be said for the satisfaction of taking a novice out even if they don't get to pull the trigger, I've now taken three people out on my ground and just to see the smiles is great.

I think the older we get the more like minded people we meet and then the more friends we make, have met quite a few local members who have drank tea in my kitchen and enjoyed a chat, all of whom I consider now as friends.

ATB WB
 

Taff

Well-Known Member
Still get a buzz out of pulling the trigger , but have always loved taking people out and seeing them get there quarry.
 

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