Avian influenza.

Triggermortis

Well-Known Member
I’ve just been told that access to a permission has been restricted due to A.I risk reduction protocols having been introduced in a bid to head off the possible spread of the decease to the so far clear property, anyone else seeing this happen to them or even having the permission withdrawn albeit on a temporary basis?
 

uptonogood

Well-Known Member
The chicken farms I do have halted all visits until further notice .Waste of time foxing when birds are shut in anyway .
 

Triggermortis

Well-Known Member
I’ve been going to one farm for over a decade and I find I seem to shoot more foxes within 50m of the sheds at night when the chickens are shut in, although decease free at the minute I have been told the birds will not be outside till April at the earliest but as long as I’m able I’ll be going there 2-3 times a week as long as the current A.I risk reduction protocol allows.
In my experience if I was to stop visiting a farm where vermin control was so important I’d not be surprised to find someone else moving in, I find a regular visit goes a long way to keeping a permission, I know of at least four occasions where people offering to take on the foxing have been told “no thankyou, we have a regular chap that takes care of our vermin control” and in fact on every occasion the farm owner has told me what went on, it’s about a level of trust .
I have also been told that so far countrywide 1.8 million birds have been culled due to A.I.
 
Last edited:

uptonogood

Well-Known Member
Agreed about the visits mate but when farmer says no ,it means no .I’ll be back but only when he says so .
Out last night and saw no foxes at all elsewhere .Plenty of deer ,hares and rabbits but wasn’t a foxy night at all .
 

nic531

Well-Known Member
It also probably means for them keeping records of visitors, having the correct biohazard protocols in place, disinfection areas for footwear etc etc etc.
easier to say non essential visitors wanted and if they feel that includes pest control as birds locked away, thats their choice.
 

Cyres

Well-Known Member
Just spoken to my local free range unit mainly to see what the rat population was looking like, which we also keep under control. Wont be going in the hen enclosures but OK to check surrounding fields for foxs. Ratting will be on hold in the main houses for sometime. Appears hens likely to be in until end of March.

D
 

TURNBOLT

Well-Known Member
Probably not, neither will ravens, grey crows, gulls or buzzards. Those sods will never come to any harm.
Probably not, neither will ravens, grey crows, gulls or buzzards. Those sods will never come to any harm.
Are you sure on this? Last spring captive birds of prey were destroyed near us.Sheds burnt on site and the owner told he couldn’t start up again for 2 years.My understanding is that any bird wild or captive can catch Avian influenza.
 
  • Like
Reactions: GWP

dunwater

Well-Known Member
Are you sure on this? Last spring captive birds of prey were destroyed near us.Sheds burnt on site and the owner told he couldn’t start up again for 2 years.My understanding is that any bird wild or captive can catch Avian influenza.
My tongue was very firmly in my cheek, not meant to be taken seriously.
But nothing does seem to bother those particular species.
 

JTO

Well-Known Member
There's a small island on a local RSPB reserve where at least 30 cormorants roosted. I drove by for a couple of early evenings in the last few days and not a single one there! 4-5 on posts 50 yards away! Perhaps the ones that didn't 'social distance' on the island have all succumbed to it. I hope so! I shooed one off my place just after first light this morning.
 

AGR

Well-Known Member
There's a small island on a local RSPB reserve where at least 30 cormorants roosted. I drove by for a couple of early evenings in the last few days and not a single one there! 4-5 on posts 50 yards away! Perhaps the ones that didn't 'social distance' on the island have all succumbed to it. I hope so! I shooed one off my place just after first light this morning.
Nah, I think they're on holiday. Sure I've seen them on a local reservoir. Black, big beaks? Full of trout? Yep, that was them!
 

GWP

Well-Known Member
Buzzards do catch the flu seen half a dozen recently some in cheshire others in cumbria keeper in cumbria said he has been finding them allover
 

EssBee

Well-Known Member
I wonder if AI might be a contibuting factor, as well as the mild weather, on some pheasant shoots complaining about low numbers!
 

Free range rob

Well-Known Member
I wonder if AI might be a contibuting factor, as well as the mild weather, on some pheasant shoots complaining about low numbers!
I don’t believe so unless they have been finding dead birds about, my farms have seen more pheasants than ever this year and they don’t release any so I reckon they have just wandered
 
Top