Vacancy: Avon & Somerset Firearms & Explosives Licensing Officer

20series

Well-Known Member
It's no wonder all the forces struggle recruiting FEO's with the salaries they are paying... although I suppose if you were supplementing a decent pension you'd be OK

Alan
 

Apthorpe

Well-Known Member
Quite so, and when a mistake is made, guess who ends up carrying the can? It’s a disgraceful situation. Loads of unnecessary burden on gun owners, administered by police forces and the Home Office who design a regulatory bureaucracy to fail to perform its duties.
You can’t employ monkeys to do this type of work and expect proper outcomes. It’s an abuse of all concerned - police staff, gun owners and the public.
You can be pretty sure the enquiry into the Plymouth shooting will go to great lengths to avoid assigning the blame where it belongs.
 

badmolassesaccident

Well-Known Member
Around the country, is it normally PCs who do this, or is it civilians?

Met Police all seem to have PCs doing it. I guess they get paid whatever PCs get paid.
 

Stalker1962

Well-Known Member


I have, (just out of morbid interest), just opened and 'completed' this application form.

I have not submitted it.

It is interesting the questions that are asked.

The questions include, my sex, my gender, any trans. surgery, the type of school I went to, what qualifications my parents had and whether or not I consider I come from a "socio-economic poor" background.

Not a single question on my experience (if any) with firearms, explosives, people, etc.



Interesting; and has given me much to mull over this morning...
 
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wytonpjs

Well-Known Member
I have, (just out of morbid interest), just opened and 'completed' this application form.

Interesting; and has given me much to mull over this morning...
As may be apparent I did 26 years in the Armed Services before coming a MOD civilian - 46 years now in Crown Service. Seven years ago, I took a chance and moved into a specialist niche safety critical post where arguably, I have now become the MOD's SME (my 1*'s belief - not mine). Despite the significant changes I have seen across Defence in this time, this post has the variety and challenge that keeps me from going stale, even as frustrating as it is due to resource issues (personnel, finance, etc); the pay even as a part-timer is not too bad either.

Anyway, returning to my OP, years ago, a SNCO from my Team "retired" and became a Cambridgeshire FEO, a post that suited him well and, as a regular shooter, he had broader knowledge I thought was essential for the post. When I was in uniform the then retirement age was 55, I became a civilian a 44 and as a Civil Servant, it was then 60 with State Pension at 65. A late second child put paid to retirement at 60 (she/he - now transgender is just finishing the first year of a Army-sponsored Civil Engineering Course) but I have always "hankered" after a similiar part-time FEO post hence my "stalking" of A&S opportunities.

Your observations above, the poor level of renumeration and the fact that these are all now apparently full-time posts means that its time to put aside these foolish notions of a part-time "retirement" job as a FEO.

Tis a pity....................
 

Stalker1962

Well-Known Member
Tis a pity...

For the sake of clarity.

I know there are "issues", that all HR departments face.

I know there are "challenges", when recruiters seek to employ folk from across the spectrum.

I know that some sections of society are disadvantaged - for a plethora of reasons.


As a simple 'punter' - I do not care what (fill in anything you like - those choices are endless) my FEO (or any other job on the planet) identifies as.

Truely, I do not care.


I would like them selected on their abilities, character and integrity. I would like to see a sufficiency of them to do the job required (across the whole UK).

I would like to see them paid at a rate which attracts quality candidates.

I would like...oh...who the Hell am I kidding?


My last variation took 187 days. The current variation is only 30 days in...

The whole world has gone to Hell in a handcart.


Unknown-11.jpeg
 

IBD

Well-Known Member
Dorset police has a job opening too.
They stress previous “investigative experience” is essential.
Guess you need be ex Police for that really.
Doesn’t mention pay but I’d imagine be low paid like take home £1600-2000/ month
 

riflerob

Well-Known Member
Unfortunately (or fortunately, depending on your viewpoint), all public sector jobs are 'banded', meaning that the skill set, etc for those jobs is assessed, the likely qualifications and intelligence needed assessed, and the job thus allocated to a band, which can NOT be deviated from.

This is useful in normal times, in that you can't get people/departments wanting pay rises, and threatening to quit if they don't get them - the simple fact of the matter is that the job is a fixed band, and apart from normal pay rises and the stepping up within that band (you start on the bottom pay and work your way up to the top over 3-5 years), that can't be changed.

At present, this is causing problems in some cases - for example, in the NHS, a HCS (health Courier Service) driver (driving vans, delivering / collecting samples to labs, patient notes, stock deliveries) is a band 2. Which pays less than £20k per annum. A HGV driver in the NHS is band 3, which caps out at under £22k per annum. So the NHS is struggling with staff retention in those areas, but they can't get round it by offering higher wages - the banding is set in law.

So this is normally a good thing, in that it prevents localised wage inflation, and the unions agreed to the banding, so people can't bargain wages up. But sometimes it means that public bodies can't get staff when there is this wage price inflation in the wider economy, or the wages they are offering look a lot lower than is otherwise available.

But, do bear in mind that there is also generous annual leave entitlement that isn't listed in that salary, along with a reasonable pension package, and if the person has to work unsociable/weekend hours then they are are paid quite generously too - myself in the NHS, I get 30 days annual leave PLUS bank holidays, and if I have to work a Sunday then I get paid at 1.83 x my normal hourly rate (that 'bonus' rate is only paid at the lower pay bands, the higher up you go the less it is, for higher bands it's 1.6 x). (My Saturday/night time rate is 1.41 x normal pay, for more senior staff it's 1.3 x)

The headline salary looks relatively poor. But it isn't the whole picture by a long shot (excuse the pun)
 

simgre

Well-Known Member
But, do bear in mind that there is also generous annual leave entitlement that isn't listed in that salary, along with a reasonable pension package, and if the person has to work unsociable/weekend hours then they are are paid quite generously too - myself in the NHS, I get 30 days annual leave PLUS bank holidays, and if I have to work a Sunday then I get paid at 1.83 x my normal hourly rate (that 'bonus' rate is only paid at the lower pay bands, the higher up you go the less it is, for higher bands it's 1.6 x). (My Saturday/night time rate is 1.41 x normal pay, for more senior staff it's 1.3 x)

The headline salary looks relatively poor. But it isn't the whole picture by a long shot (excuse the pun)

Well the NHS certainly fare better than the police! 22 days leave till 12 years service, 25 till 20 years service before getting 30.

Even inflation related pay rises have been sorely lacking and on the whole, Police pay, for constables and civilians, has fallen 20% in real terms over the last 10 years.

Most civilian support staff in the police barely make minimum wage…
 

nun_hunter

Well-Known Member
Well the NHS certainly fare better than the police! 22 days leave till 12 years service, 25 till 20 years service before getting 30.

Even inflation related pay rises have been sorely lacking and on the whole, Police pay, for constables and civilians, has fallen 20% in real terms over the last 10 years.

Most civilian support staff in the police barely make minimum wage…
It's very accurate what you say and although a job in the public sector is relatively "safe" you generally have a lot of responsibility and risk for not much renumeration.

I was chatting to a friend last week (ex copper) who was saying how pleased he is to have left but it amazes him that as a recruitment consultant who gets to work from home he now gets paid more than a superintendent who would be in charge of police firearms operations, public order incidents, major investigations etc and rather than jumping through all the hoops and back scratching that goes on to get promoted in the police all he's had to do is be good at his job and he's been promoted and paid accordingly.
 

riflerob

Well-Known Member
Well the NHS certainly fare better than the police! 22 days leave till 12 years service, 25 till 20 years service before getting 30.

Even inflation related pay rises have been sorely lacking and on the whole, Police pay, for constables and civilians, has fallen 20% in real terms over the last 10 years.

Most civilian support staff in the police barely make minimum wage…

Yes, the NHS do get better BASIC holiday allowance than the police.

But the police get better allowance for bank holiday working (double time, very nice, AND a day back if you've been required to work it at short notice).

The perks for each are probably comparable
 

simgre

Well-Known Member
🤣 aye, I get what you’re saying. But just for continuation sake, if you work a bank holiday, you get paid double time, but no day back. If you are a scheduled rest day on a bank holiday, you will get a rest day in lieu put in your “pot”.

But, if you’re told that there are enough numbers on duty on bank holiday, and despite it being your scheduled shift, you will have the day off. But, in this scenario, bank holidays are regarded as “eight hours” and if on 10 hour shifts you’ll miss out on the additional pay and will still owe the job two hours for that day, which accrues!

I’m not working the two jubilee bank holidays, been told I’m not required. Two days off and I’ll owe four hours!!
 

Jura

Well-Known Member
I have, (just out of morbid interest), just opened and 'completed' this application form.

I have not submitted it.

It is interesting the questions that are asked.

The questions include, my sex, my gender, any trans. surgery, the type of school I went to, what qualifications my parents had and whether or not I consider I come from a "socio-economic poor" background.

Not a single question on my experience (if any) with firearms, explosives, people, etc.



Interesting; and has given me much to mull over this morning...

It seems things are no different in Australia, this was posted today on LinkedIn by Andrew Cockett: -

"I have never really used LinkedIn, but here goes.

I hope I offend some viewers.

My 12 year old daughter came home from school today
and she was utterly confused by the teaching of him/he/her/they
and the consistent messaging of gender correctness she is exposed
to at school.

She is 12 years old.

At her school, they are learning about ancient Greece.
Today she was pulled up for referring to Julius Caesar as ‘he’.

Do I need to say any more?

Yes, apparently referring to Julius Caesar as ‘he’ offends some people.

Well, here is my take on ‘all that’.

If you have a problem with Julius Caesar being a boy, a man and a he
then that is YOUR problem and not mine and definitely not my 12 year
old daughters problem.

If it offends you that I refer to men as men, good.
The more people that offends, the better.

If this post offends you, brilliant.

If you want to ‘cancel' me, go ahead.

We live in a world of Men, Women and ‘other’.

Keep it simple and stop confusing our children!"

 

Klenchblaize

Well-Known Member
Notwithstanding salary and the other points made by the more knowledgeable SD member, I cannot help feel an interest in, and demonstrable understanding of, firearms and the activities we may legally use them in conjunction with is the last quality the Home Office HR Deparment look for in a candidate.

Indeed it may well be a barrrier to appointment, albeit an unspoken one.

K
 

20-250

Well-Known Member
Notwithstanding salary and the other points made by the more knowledgeable SD member, I cannot help feel an interest in, and demonstrable understanding of, firearms and the activities we may legally use them in conjunction with is the last quality the Home Office HR Deparment look for in a candidate.

Indeed it may well be a barrrier to appointment, albeit an unspoken one.

K
There are no Firearms Enquiry Officers on the Home Office payroll. FEOs are police support staff, not Civil Servants.
 

bobthedug

Well-Known Member
Yes, the NHS do get better BASIC holiday allowance than the police.

But the police get better allowance for bank holiday working (double time, very nice, AND a day back if you've been required to work it at short notice).

The perks for each are probably comparable
Just catching up on this thread and read your comment.
Police Scotland, only have 2 public/ bank holidays a year now. They are Christmas Day and New Years day. No re rostered days as sufficient advance notice is always given.
I’m retired a number of years now but my good lady is still serving on a front line role and there are very few perks left nowadays.
 
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