Back leg stiffness

Malxwal

Well-Known Member
My wee sprocker is about seven years old, and of late, we've been noticing she sometimes carries one of her back legs. No obvious paw issues, and it seems to free up once she gets going. Certainly doesn't slow the little b***er up in amongst the game crops!
Wondering if, apart from the obvious dedicated inspection by a vet, theres anything folk feed/apply/buy to ease this type of thing?
 

Dexter

Well-Known Member
Green lipped muscle supplement. A keeper mate of mine recons that it's transformed his 9 year old springer. So much so that he's started taking it himself.
 

Sonicdmb73

Well-Known Member
Glucosamine and green lipped mussel supplement in the food I feed.
Been giving Glucosamine for years. It’s basically a lubricant/repair agent for the joints. I have spaniels too, my eldest is going on nine not that you’d notice.
 

delta wolf

Well-Known Member
Joint aid. Worked superbly with my working dogs. If it continues however see a vet, my spaniel did a cruciate at that age.
 

Malxwal

Well-Known Member
Well, she's fair crippling tonight after four drives today, but then shes been laid up since she was dried and fed about 4pm, so will have stiffened up as usual. Will have a blether with the vet, order some supplements as described.
 

sauer

Well-Known Member
I take myself glucosamine and cod liver oil .... heard about green lipped muse extract but stuff I found online cost a packet
!

Wouldn’t mind myself as well as
Muttley

Paul
 

Gm81

Well-Known Member
Another supporter of Yumove for working dogs. I get it from Viovet. It worked on my 9 yr old spaniel.
I now give all my dogs one tablet morning and night.
I also got the human stuff Imove for me. It does work on me. But I think it's very personnel to if you have gains or not.
I also think it's a few weeks before you notice it's gradual affect. My spaniel was given a new lease of life for 12 months.
 

srvet

Well-Known Member
There have been some extensive well designed placebo controlled studies on glucosamine and chondroitin that showed no effect. Other studies have suggested a very mild anti inflammaeffect. There does appear to be some effect with Omega 3 supplementation which exerts an anti inflammatory effect by modifying substrates in proinflammatory cascades. Green lipped mussel extract in Yumove is high in omega 3.
I would suggest that rather than going down the line of treating arthritis with substances of dubious efficacy that it is better to see a vet and reach a diagnosis as to what has caused the problem. Principle differentials from what you have said are cruciate ligament disease, hip dysplasia, patellar ligation and lumbosacral disease. Other far less common causes are possible and could include lateralised intervertebral disc extrusion immune mediated joint disease, Lymes disease etc. Hope this helps
 

Malxwal

Well-Known Member
Vet reports no issues of concern. Right rear knee pops in and out rather easily though, and he suspects this may have been case with left, but now a small amount of swelling, possible scar tissue. Dog is trotting away bonny. Advice on supplements is as expected, at worst they can do no harm.
Back to work for her tomorrow.
 

srvet

Well-Known Member
Sounds like patella luxation (not ligation as in my previous post - damn autocorrect!) This is common and more than enough to explain the symptoms, particularly if they come and go quickly. Once the patella starts luxating it tends to keep doing so, not too painful initially but it becomes more sore when the patella wears through the cartilage on the edge of the groove. Some information in the link below

Patellar Luxation in dogs
 

Malxwal

Well-Known Member
Sounds like patella luxation (not ligation as in my previous post - damn autocorrect!) This is common and more than enough to explain the symptoms, particularly if they come and go quickly. Once the patella starts luxating it tends to keep doing so, not too painful initially but it becomes more sore when the patella wears through the cartilage on the edge of the groove. Some information in the link below

Patellar Luxation in dogs
Thanks for your input, very much appreciated, as is everybodys.
My wee dog is still working away, and the stiffness seems to be pretty much gone just now.
 

Alantoo

Well-Known Member
Sounds like patella luxation (not ligation as in my previous post - damn autocorrect!) This is common and more than enough to explain the symptoms, particularly if they come and go quickly. Once the patella starts luxating it tends to keep doing so, not too painful initially but it becomes more sore when the patella wears through the cartilage on the edge of the groove. Some information in the link below

Patellar Luxation in dogs
Interesting article thank you.

Purely on technical /practical basis...how do you actually cut the bone to remove that block without destroying it when you are doing Step 2 – Trochleoplasty – (groove deepening) i.e. what tool do you use...and do you then remove the extra bone from the removed block or the bottom of the cavity?

Our little springer was holding one of her back legs up on a couple of occasions for an hour or so a couple of weeks ago, I better get that looked at.

Alan
 

srvet

Well-Known Member
Interesting article thank you.

Purely on technical /practical basis...how do you actually cut the bone to remove that block without destroying it when you are doing Step 2 – Trochleoplasty – (groove deepening) i.e. what tool do you use...and do you then remove the extra bone from the removed block or the bottom of the cavity?

Our little springer was holding one of her back legs up on a couple of occasions for an hour or so a couple of weeks ago, I better get that looked at.

Alan
Two parallel vertical cuts using a hard backed bone saw (think tiny tenon saw) at the apex of the ridge each side of the groove then a fine bladed chisel to undercut the block. The bone block is temporarily removed, the channel deepened then the block seated back in the channel. Simples!!
 

Alantoo

Well-Known Member
Two parallel vertical cuts using a hard backed bone saw (think tiny tenon saw) at the apex of the ridge each side of the groove then a fine bladed chisel to undercut the block. The bone block is temporarily removed, the channel deepened then the block seated back in the channel. Simples!!
Ah right thank you, I must have a closer look when I am next butchering a deer, do they have a similar configuration?...I saw the photo and stupidly thought in terms of a woodworker's mortice and not the position on the end of the bone when the ends of the block would be exposed for the chisel like a woodworkers finger joint

My woodworker father called those little fine backed tenon saws "Gent saws" must look up why. I have both a Gent saw and an even smaller brass backed jeweller's saw in the workshop, but have no fears that I will set up in veterinary competition and try to undercut you!

See what I did there? :)

Alan
 

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