Barnes TTSX & TSX

Totsy

Well-Known Member
Do these bullets behave like normal soft points on a deer? Also, are they longer for a given weight compared to lead core? Is there much variation on how the different calibres/weights behave i.e fragmentation in faster cal.?
 

NellyT

Well-Known Member
I don't use them but the idea is they do NOT fragment, open up into a petal and retain almost all weight compared to soft point etc.. also expensive.
 

stubear

Well-Known Member
The other thing to bear in mind is that monolithic bullets are not allowed on certain ranges (for example Bisley does not allow them, though I had heard a whisper you can use them at the BSRA - I'd need to check on that though). I'm also pretty sure monolithics are not allowed on MOD ranges either. This is all due to the ricochet risk, and having solid lumps of copper in the sandbank at the butts which other rounds could hit and ping out.

I'm not sure if the ban stands on every range but its worth considering if you're planning on some range time to get used to your kit.

There is also a consideration around the game you are going after. I've not used monolithics myself but have read that some (such as the Hornady GMX) are very hard and possibly dont expand properly in small thin skinned game, or unless the velocity is very high, meaning these bullets are better suited to heavier tougher animals like boar.

If its controlled expansion you're after then you might find bullets like the Partition, Interbond or Accubond are an option as they designed to still expand well in smaller game whilst maintaining good weight retention in bigger beasts.
 

srvet

Well-Known Member
I have been using TSX and TTSX bullets for years and have shot deer with a variety of calibres from 22/250 to 308 and 7 rem mag. A close friend has used them extensively in 6.5 with good success. The bullets expand rapidly and work in a predictable manner that is in my hands extremely effective. I see fewer runners than with lead core bullets however I do believe that you need to consider the differing performance envelopes compared to lead core bullets. The thing to remember is that for optimal performance the impact velocity needs to be relatively higher than lead core bullets. The best way to achieve this is to use light for calibre bullets pushed quite fast and keep ranges sensible (sub 250). What I get in return is deer that drop right where they stand with minimal meat damage. I understand that the Fox bullets from Ed Bewsher achieve something very similar and these are readily available. My favourite bullet in 308 is the 130g TTSX and the 120g TTSX in the 7mm. These penetrate really well so you don’t need a heavier bullet. Accuracy is excellent in all my rifles. What’s not to like?

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This is a group with the 120g TTSX from the Rem mag
 

deerwarden

Well-Known Member
I used Barnes TTX 130 gn bullets in my 270 in Africa several times, they drill trough bone and flesh and left an exit hole on the rear side on the smaller plains game. On wildebeest etc, they drilled through the chest cavity and ended up on the far side of the beast just under the skin. I took 11 animals one year up to 400yds with no bullet failure whatsoever, no runners just 10-15 yds then they went down, the S.A. P.H. was very impressed with them. I have had a ricochet's here in the U.K. on a large estate, the bullet went right through the deer and bounced off a log. deerwarden
 

Rider

Well-Known Member
.... they drill trough bone and flesh ....
A frequent myth. Consider a 10" or 12" twist on your barrel, which are quite common. This means the bullet will make one full turn while travelling over 10 or 12 inches. How wide is a deer?
 

zambezi

Well-Known Member

kenbro

Well-Known Member
A frequent myth. Consider a 10" or 12" twist on your barrel, which are quite common. This means the bullet will make one full turn while travelling over 10 or 12 inches. How wide is a deer?
Try this calc. MV X (12/ twist rate in inches) X 60 = RPM.
Ken.
PS. Bullet from 12 twist barrel at 3000 fps = 3000 revs per second.
 
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Rider

Well-Known Member
And how long does it take for the bullet to pass through the deer? Now apply your math again
 
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nun_hunter

Well-Known Member
I don't think he is suggesting the bullet actually drills through bone more the fact it punches/pushes/shoots through without deforming and fragmenting. Its just a phrase, in the same way in football "he drilled that shot into the back of the net" doesn't mean he actually put so much spin on the ball it physically drilled it's way into the net!
 

Alantoo

Well-Known Member
A frequent myth. Consider a 10" or 12" twist on your barrel, which are quite common. This means the bullet will make one full turn while travelling over 10 or 12 inches. How wide is a deer?
A frequent myth? How do you know? Do a lot of people take such a narrow interpretation of the word drilling? In that context I presumed deerwarden just used it as a synonym for penetrate.

Technically anyway "Drilling" does not have to be primarily rotational with the cutting edges following a tight helical path as you imply...have you ever come across the old Rawl hand masonry drills or the actions of percussion drills or water jet drills?

As for the OP's question I have used TTSX home-load 130 grain in .308 which are around 2900fps. They have been as effective as any soft point bullet I have used. So far they have all resulted in one shot one kill, but I have had strange things happen with both. A 150 grain Sako soft point turned at right angles upon hitting the far side of a Muntjac's rib cage. And a TTSX 130 deflected upwards within the body of a fallow doe and left a 25 metre track along the ground starting 50 metres on the bank behind the strike point.

Alan
 

Shootgun

Well-Known Member
88E0C1BA-1B93-4A4F-92AC-245CE6AEE63B.jpeg

The only TSX which did’t exited ...
I found them excellent but i have moved over to RWS HIT as there are hole in hole in my rifles
 

NigelM

Well-Known Member
I have used TTSX and LRX extensively. They are long for weight and you should use light for calibre to keep velocity high. They do little meat damage and I found them to be very accurate.

Terminal expansion is excellent down to about 2200 fps, which is why you need to keep the velocity up. For UK stalking ranges they work very well, but the Kiwi's don't like them because out at the longer ranges they shoot over velocity is too low and expansion poor. They prefer Amax/ELD-X as they expand and perform well down to about 1300fps, a major consideration when shooting deer and goats at 600m to 1000m.

I stopped using them because of the risk of ricochets and the high velocity pass throughs. I have a lot of footpaths and dog walkers on my permissions and I got a bit paranoid about safety. I'm now using Accubonds at slower velocities which I'm happier with. I still wouldn't hesitate to use them on the hill. they are a great bullet when used within their design parameters.
 

jb7x57

Well-Known Member
Problem I’ve got is forestry Scotland will not let you use any bullets with lead content on there ground also some game dealers are asking for you to state no lead was used to kill the deer was very happy with my 243 but moved to a 6.5 cm so I could use 100 grn copper
 

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