Barrel break-in, unnecessary faff or worthwhile?

Dorset Shakari

Well-Known Member
Picking up a new rifle next week. First in a long time. I haven't bothered with a break-in regime before, and I'm wondering if it's worth the trouble.

Is is necessary? What's your regime?
 

Jimbob39

Well-Known Member
I was in the same place a few weeks ago! Some say yes some say no! I went with the do it side and all I can say is my rifle will stick 5 rounds through the same hole at 100 yds. Whether it would have done this by just blasting away and not cleaning etc I can’t comment. All I know is I’m glad I did run it in!
 

Woodsmoke

Well-Known Member
Do whatever gives you confidence in the rifle :thumb: If it doesn't do any good, it certainly won't do any harm.
 

LuckyEddie

Well-Known Member
Don’t manufacturers say that their barrels shoot to whatever accuracy?
I would expect a rifle to meet their standard out of the box without any bedding in.
To check I’d have some target practice to confirm this, say 5 - 10 shots at my desired range; but I wouldn‘t specifically hassle myself to break-in a rifle.
 

Jimbob39

Well-Known Member
Don’t manufacturers say that their barrels shoot to whatever accuracy?
I would expect a rifle to meet their standard out of the box without any bedding in.
To check I’d have some target practice to confirm this, say 5 - 10 shots at my desired range; but I wouldn‘t specifically hassle myself to break-in a rifle.
That’s something I also thought! Mine was terrible grouping for the first 3 shots, roughly 3”! After 2nd batch of 3 it was down to 2” then after final 5 it was less than an inch. It’s now easily single ragged hole at 100yds after 80 rounds.
 

paulbshooting

Well-Known Member
I always have and will never know if it ever will make.a.difference. But.like my other "routines" including the.ocaasional zero, rifle clean etc. It all.gives me confidence in my kit in any situation.
 

Lever357

Well-Known Member
I've just started reading The Green Meanie by Steve Houghton and Accuracy International really had to force the army to shoot their new rifles in. They were do used to using old Enfields converted into 'new' rifles.
 

Girl_with_a_gun

Well-Known Member
Yes, yes and yes again. In the same way I wouldn't kick the a*s6 out of my motorbikes until I'd run them in and taken all the manufacturing rough edges off. Unless you've spent a whole shed load of money and they've already done that bit for you?
 

The Singing Stalker

Well-Known Member
Yes, yes and yes again. In the same way I wouldn't kick the a*s6 out of my motorbikes until I'd run them in and taken all the manufacturing rough edges off. Unless you've spent a whole shed load of money and they've already done that bit for you?
But you can’t adjust the speed of your bullet, well you can if you home load.
I have never broke a rifle in. They all shot 1moa from start, and they have never got worse, so I think it is a lot of faff. Shoot it and if it groups 1 Moa then it is fine. As you put more down the battle it may get better.
 

Heym SR20

Well-Known Member
With older cars, and when you had a reconditioned engine you always took it very slowly. If you did so they lasted a long time.

I see no difference in treating a modern car, rifle or for that matter any other mechanical machine the same way. You have everything to gain and not a lot to loose.

But its your hard earned cash and your rifle.
 

Rusty Gate

Well-Known Member
Picking up a new rifle next week. First in a long time. I haven't bothered with a break-in regime before, and I'm wondering if it's worth the trouble.

Is is necessary? What's your regime?
You spent many an hour working hard to save for the new rifle, a little extra to break the barrel is no big deal & certainly wont make things worse. I never have a problem selling mine, they know I break it in every time.
Cars dont need running in, ever heard one leave the showroom at 6000 rpm
 

LuckyEddie

Well-Known Member
Just watched a Youtube vid of a tour of the Sako factory.
They fire two rounds over pressure to check safety and then a magazine (3 or 5 rounds depending on the gun) to check accuracy at 100m.
The manager of the site said this was done to ensure the gun was “ready to play“ as it was taken out of the box.
So do we really need to break a gun in?
 

stubear

Well-Known Member
Never bothered running the barrel in for accuracy but every time I've bought a new rifle I've always put 100 rounds or so through it to say hello like.
 

muddy42

Well-Known Member
It is one of those things that will be impossible to prove either way. But it can't do any harm and I do believe in cleaning barrels occasionaly. As a minimum you need to zero it and get comfortable with the rifle, however I can't see the benefit of firing hundreds of rounds. I zeroed and shot a deer with the 7th shot out of the barrel in the autumn.
 

cjm1066

Well-Known Member
A sako barrel is hammer forged, it is probably unnecessary to shoot it in.

A cut rifle barrel has longitudinal cuts for the rifling and rotary cuts for the chamber/throat. It is more likely to benefit from shooting in.
 

safer

Well-Known Member
Better to do it even if you don't need to then not do it and find you should have. What harm could it do to the rifle?
I do 5 rounds - clean with oily patch - dry patch and repeat 4 times. I wait for the barrel to completley cool down before cleaning.
I undestand that barrels are much better quality but as I said - what harm could it do.
 

Malxwal

Well-Known Member
Pal bought a new 270 setup last week, a Sako Finnlight 2. Right from the off it was putting Sako Powerhead 2 TTSX 110 into half inch groups. He has the VFG cleaning gear, and put two or three patches through it after each couple of rounds for about 12 rounds, and they did appear to be progressively less manky. Was it necessary ? Possibly not, but it gave him confidence. He cleans his rifle after every outing anyway.
Finished off with a couple of hits in the 6" gong at 309 yds, a very happy new Sako 270 owner, ready to comply with estate rules on lead free.
 
Top