BBQ Roe Haunch

BryanDC

Well-Known Member
I'm going to try and BBQ a Roe haunch (bone in) on saturday. Has anyone tried this and have any advice?
 

75

Well-Known Member
Experimented with both slow and fast - not enough fat in it in my opinion for slow cooking and the meat just dries out - especially on a BBQ when you can't cover it. Best way I've found is to bone and butterfly the haunch then treat it as a massive steak. Maybe marinade in garlic, olive oil and rosemary first but serve pink.
 

BryanDC

Well-Known Member
Thanks for the input. I hadn't thought of just finishing it on the BBQ. I have seen a recipe for the boned and butterflied option just not sure if my butchery skills are up to it.
 

Woodsmoke

Well-Known Member
I've done this in the past, but boned and butterflied the joint first to give it an even thickness. Boning it is simplicity itself with a wee bit of care: you just need to locate both ends of the bone and cut through the meat following the line of the bone. Once you start you'll see exactly where to cut. Then just lay the meat out and make further cuts to butterfly it out into one large piece of (almost) even thickness. ANd just treat is a a steak, as 75 says.

If you've got your heart set on serving it on the bone, then wrapped in foil and roasted before flashing it over the coals is the way to go in my book. My mouth's watering at the thought, regardless
 

willowbank

Well-Known Member
I've done this in the past, but boned and butterflied the joint first to give it an even thickness. Boning it is simplicity itself with a wee bit of care: you just need to locate both ends of the bone and cut through the meat following the line of the bone. Once you start you'll see exactly where to cut. Then just lay the meat out and make further cuts to butterfly it out into one large piece of (almost) even thickness. ANd just treat is a a steak, as 75 says.

If you've got your heart set on serving it on the bone, then wrapped in foil and roasted before flashing it over the coals is the way to go in my book. My mouth's watering at the thought, regardless

And mine yummy.....

Willowbank
 

pazmino

Well-Known Member
Mike Robinson in his Country Cookbook has an excellent recipe for butterfly roasted haunch of muntjac - no reason it can't be done with roe. I've tried it once and it worked very well. Basically take the bone out (even I can do it, and I'm a useless butcher, plenty of videos online), then make lots of cuts to end up with a reasonably flat, large piece of meat. Then marinade for a day in a mixture of olive oil, rosemary, garlic and chilli that you've first whizzed up in a blender. Barbecue for 7-10 minutes each side, then cover and rest for 15-20 minutes.
 

tusker

Well-Known Member
Experimented with both slow and fast - not enough fat in it in my opinion for slow cooking and the meat just dries out - especially on a BBQ when you can't cover it. Best way I've found is to bone and butterfly the haunch then treat it as a massive steak. Maybe marinade in garlic, olive oil and rosemary first but serve pink.
Yes, this is how I have done it for years. lovely.
Tusker
 

Oh6

Well-Known Member
I'm going to try and BBQ a Roe haunch (bone in) on saturday. Has anyone tried this and have any advice?

This will depend a lot on the type of BBQ that you are using. If it is an open grill or one that you cook with the lid on (like a weber kettle bbq).

I have cooked a lot of roe haunches in a webber kettle, and as it works very much like an oven it's no problem and doesn't dry out which I was concerned about the first time I tried it.

If you are cooking with an open grill then the suggestions to start cooking in an oven and then finish on the BBQ might be a better plan.
 

BryanDC

Well-Known Member
I decided to go down the route of finishing it on the BBQ after starting it in the oven. It was a Webber type BBQ but I didn't use the lid. I gave it just a little too long in the oven for my own taste but everyone else seemed to enjoy it. Next time I will give it 10 mins less in the oven. Thanks everyone for the advice.
 

woodmaster

Well-Known Member
I have cooked quite a number on my bbq now with far better results than you might think.
My bbq is a simple affair. An old tank about 4ft long x 2ft wide. I have welded some bars up the ends with slots for supporting a length of re-bar at different heights. Off this bar I hang my large joint/s of meat either side of a decent fire in the centre of the bbq. Initially while the fire is blazing I keep the meat back a bit so it does not get in the flame and go black. I also have it quite low down along side the fire. Then as the fire dies off I bring it closer and over the embers. The outside obviously gets scorched/seared and looks a little black sometimes but you need this as it seals the moisture in the meat. This is "roasted". When you cook in the oven you are baking not roasting. It takes about 2 hours to do a roe haunch or leg of lamb and the sure way to tell if its right is to use a meat thermometer. As soon as the centre of the joint reaches 66 degC its done. It will be slightly pink but still juicy. If you havent got a big enough bbq then you'll struggle to make a good job as the meat will be directly over the heat and scorch up on the outside before the middle gets a chance to heat up.

Happy hunting and eating.
 

RM100

Well-Known Member
I used the following recipe as a base, for a roe hind leg in my Weber. Low and slow for about 4-5 hours. Unbelievable, just need a fork for the meat. Must cover, I use a roasting tin which is covered with foil.
 

sauer

Well-Known Member
Thanks for the input. I hadn't thought of just finishing it on the BBQ. I have seen a recipe for the boned and butterflied option just not sure if my butchery skills are up to it.


Glad to hear turned out ok ...

Only way butchery skills going to get better is practice !
Get after it ....it’s easy honest!
Watch Scott Reas videos on you tube .

With regard to bbq ......use Weber style with lid ...you can cook
Indirect where coals at one side and meat at other .

Other good thing to buy is a meat thermometer ...thermopen probe style ....no more guess work ..probe ...get temp ...and you can get your internal temps info for rare medium well done etc from the net .

Takes guesswork out of it ..l do a bit with smoker and bbq and it’s invaluable

Paul
 
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