BDS Webinar Series: UK Venison Market and its Future

devon deer stalker

Well-Known Member
What also holds things back is the lack of an immutable level of traceability from field to fork, showing that the carcass has been kept appropriately from the shot onwards. Nick Rout touched on this last night, with talk of carcass tags - he mentioned ear tags similar to those used for livestock, but I can also see a place for the type of carcass tags used in the US. I can imagine the uproar from the stalking community were such an idea to be touted, but quite frankly whilst the largely voluntary system that is in place at present may do what it is designed for, it is still pretty rudimentary when it comes to supply chain best practice.
Don't we do this already?
You shoot a deer and tag it with your hunter number, deliver to game dealer, job done.
Or are you referring to shooting and producing it yourself?
All you need to do is mark on your label your own reference number.
It cannot be compared to the US system, you pay for a TAG to hunt, once harvested the TAG remains with the carcass, they can't split it down and sell the meat, that would be illegal.
But what the US does have is food banks, they are very well setup, it's where I have delivered my game in the past, one even charged me a $20 processing fee!
Cheers
Richard
 

willie_gunn

Well-Known Member
I am talking about the current process.

It may provide basic traceability for the relatively small amount of venison currently put into the system, but it has more holes than a sieve when looked at from the perspective of the supply chains used by major food producers and supermarkets.

Supermarkets use farmed venison because it is fully traceable, consistent and low risk. It would be hard to say the same of wild venison for a number of reasons, many of which are admittedly beyond the control of stalkers.

I am not suggesting a physical tag is necessarily something that is paid for in order to hunt in the first place, but adding a physical tag would at least help to secure the provenance of any carcass put into the food chain - whether through AGHE's or via restaurants, pubs, etc.
 

ndjfb01

Active Member
I had a quick look on the forum and couldnt see if this topic had been posted. Who has watched the BDS webinar on venison prices? Any thoughts? ( aside from the guys struggling with technology on the session, it wasnt very slick!!)


The only guy that I thought was in complete touch with small time stalkers was "Nick" specifically when he spelled out our investments surrounding stalking and handing out instruction to the other panel members on how unmute🤣

There is no magic cure for meat price increases yet and I felt the panel lobbied hard the idea of us becoming meat processors, finding our own route to market which is fine if you have the room and time for it!

The message I took away was that expecting prices to increase is like trying to polish a turd, there is no light yet, nor will there be for sometime....sadly.
 

leec6.5

Well-Known Member
I had a quick look on the forum and couldnt see if this topic had been posted. Who has watched the BDS webinar on venison prices? Any thoughts? ( aside from the guys struggling with technology on the session, it wasnt very slick!!)


The only guy that I thought was in complete touch with small time stalkers was "Nick" specifically when he spelled out our investments surrounding stalking and handing out instruction to the other panel members on how unmute🤣

There is no magic cure for meat price increases yet and I felt the panel lobbied hard the idea of us becoming meat processors, finding our own route to market which is fine if you have the room and time for it!

The message I took away was that expecting prices to increase is like trying to polish a turd, there is no light yet, nor will there be for sometime....sadly.
I doubt there will be a price rise in the next 10 years.

Processing your own carcasses to sell is an absolute ball ache, i was a butcher years ago and if I really wanted to i could do My own to sell, but guess what............ not your your nelly.

Too much like hard work and hassle!

Good luck to anyone who’s gonna have a crack at it 👍 you will soon see what I mean!
 

willie_gunn

Well-Known Member
There’s a whole thread on it in the Events section here:

 

PorkChops

Active Member
What also holds things back is the lack of an immutable level of traceability from field to fork, showing that the carcass has been kept appropriately from the shot onwards. Nick Rout touched on this last night, with talk of carcass tags - he mentioned ear tags similar to those used for livestock, but I can also see a place for the type of carcass tags used in the US. I can imagine the uproar from the stalking community were such an idea to be touted, but quite frankly whilst the largely voluntary system that is in place at present may do what it is designed for, it is still pretty rudimentary when it comes to supply chain best practice.

From my perspective I believe we are at an inflection point - either we can carry on the way we are and continue to whinge about poor venison prices, or we need to up our game and focus on being food producers. There are pros and cons to both, but at some point hard choices will have to be made, and if we don't make them ourselves they may well be forced upon us.
It may provide basic traceability for the relatively small amount of venison currently put into the system, but it has more holes than a sieve when looked at from the perspective of the supply chains used by major food producers and supermarkets.

Supermarkets use farmed venison because it is fully traceable, consistent and low risk. It would be hard to say the same of wild venison for a number of reasons, many of which are admittedly beyond the control of stalkers.
I couldn't agree with you more. Traceability from the moment the carcass is dropped off at the AGHE is lost as far as I can tell. The whole culture needs to shift towards being food producers - in the first instance it is just about thinking differently. The doing differently then follows. The whole chain is obviously beyind the control of stalkers but we all play a part and things change one step at a time.

When our beef ends up at the butcher's, they put up a sign with breed, age, sex and ear tag number. The same level of traceability should be possible for venison so that the butcher/pub/restaurant *knows* where the meat came from.

PC
 

spiker76

Well-Known Member
Having just watched this i found it very informative and interesting the last comment about Buck and Does is very true ,until people start hitting the Does Hard we will always have a population issue,How many outfitters/Stalkers would call on a buck amnesty for a season and only shoot does???(would it be feasible ) or is it that Antlers mean £s

I fully understand the issues with high risk foods ie mince ,Sausages and burgers (processed foods)( Management of your Critical Control Points would need to be spot on a quick chat with your EHO would confirm what you could do in your situation )

But this would be a way of introducing venison into the mainstream household and bringing children up recognising it as a normal mainstream food source ,everything you can do with Beef mince can be done with venison .(Chilli,Lasagne,Pie ,Burgers you get it)

This would also help to remove the posh TAG associated with venison and the next generation would grow up understanding that they are eating a everyday product not SPECIAL OCCASION food

I can't believe we have 66 Million (?) people in the uk which needs feeding and we can't move our own venison on for sale ,and carcasses being purchased as low as £0.77 a kilo as a knock on effect must be crippling for the stalkers who rely on income from venison sales

If you were to mince a whole smaller fallow (Whole deer) and get 30 x 1kg bags prime mince and sell for £5.00 kg you would Gross £150 for that carcasse ( This is just an example) more than affordable for most households and would be sustainable to produce

I find it quite difficult to digest when Farm shops,Supermarkets, Butchers are pricing dice at £21KG and steak at £26kg (Examples from what i have seen )

and somewhat think that the source (Stalker) is being _ _ _ _ _ _ O V E R !!!!!!
 

mereside

Well-Known Member
The problem we have here is that hunting is taboo and actually marketing a hunting product or food is wrong as that’s what’s been drummed in by the few who want it banning, in the US although they don’t or are not allowed to sell the meat it has been pushed that all game meat is good for you and better than buying processed or farmed, the whole culture is about looking after the outdoors and pumping money into the fish and game management, hunting is done as a way to feed themselves with good meat here’s one poster showing the value of such game meats.
People need to market the same way showing the benefits of how good for you it can be and actually showing how hunting is good for the environment and the sustainability of Uk produce, we hide too much from hunting but it has to be done ethically and shown to be a benefit, look at any state fish and game website on how much effort is put into management and showing how good hunting is for the areas they manage.
 

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