Bedding in a Barrel

Sako Hunter

Well-Known Member
I've just recently taken delivery of a Sako 85 Hunter in .243, I took the rifle out for zeroing and was achieving reasonable groups at around 100yds. However on a second outing despite running the barrel through with a clean patch before firing, the odd round appeared to shoot wild. I would then obtain a couple of shots in a nice group, before again a wild shot, usually high. I am using factory ammunition (Federal 100 grain)

Is it true that I may need 50 - 60 rounds through the rifle to bed in the barrel?
 

243varmint

Well-Known Member
Before I bought my T3 varmint in 243 I read that you should 'run ' your barrel in. so the procedure went like this:
1 round -1clean through. total 6 rounds
2 rounds -1 clean through total12 rounds
3 rounds- 1clean through total 18 rounds

I carried out this routeen and it groups 1" groups every time( that is when the bloke behind the trigger does his part ;) )

Hope this is of some use

Jonathon
 

243varmint

Well-Known Member
Forgot to say that a few months ago in Sporting Rifle ther was a rifle maker loading or selling rounds that run the barrel in to get rid of any machining burrs in the barrel

Jonathon
 

Bob

Well-Known Member
Speak to at least one riflesmith before using any fire-lapping rounds, prudent also to speak to the manufacturer for their opinion and to see if it infringes warranty

Bob
 

BP75

Well-Known Member
Border Barrels have an informative section on their website that should be helpful to you.

http://www.border-barrels.com/

Hope things get better, you could also try other ammo, I have never rated Federal......or rather my SSG has never liked it!

All the best

Ben
 

ejg

Well-Known Member
JC, that sounds more like stock touching the barrel, sometimes more sometimes less.
If you shoot off a sandbag or bipod, you could do a simple test. Put a little more downward pressure on your rifle in your shooting position and let someone else run a piece of paper under your barrel to see if it is free floating from the stock under practical conditions. Most factory rifles it isn't. Open the barrel channel until it is. This should be done with every rifle.
Next step would be to get the rifle "glass" bedded which would improve accuracy and especially consistency.
I don't believe in the "running in" as such, but I've noticed a new barrel often fouls quicker and needs shorter cleaning intervals.

edi
 

Sako Hunter

Well-Known Member
Thanks guys, I will give it a go and see and see if things improve. It sounds like I just need to run the barrel in a little.
 

Muir

Well-Known Member
Shoot it but don't clean it. Just shoot a few range sessions without cleaning and see if that odd high flier disappears.~Muir
 

swampy

Well-Known Member
243varmint said:
Before I bought my T3 varmint in 243 I read that you should 'run ' your barrel in. so the procedure went like this:
1 round -1clean through. total 6 rounds
2 rounds -1 clean through total12 rounds
3 rounds- 1clean through total 18 rounds

I carried out this routeen and it groups 1" groups every time( that is when the bloke behind the trigger does his part ;) )

Hope this is of some use

Jonathon

This is how i do it as well. I spoke to a rifle smith about it and he told me that when a barrel is made it has some minor burrs in it when you put a round down it it grabs a little bit of copper. if you then put another one down it it grabs a bit more copper and presses the first bit into the barrell wall a bit. so if you do the one round then clean it trick it removes these burrs and stops that build up of copper.

Also burned powder residue takes up a consistancy a bit like glass. so putting another bullet down it will force the abrasive residue into the barrell a bit more.

I thought it sounded sensible and came from a good source so thats the way i work now.... i try to take good advice, i am too old to know it all.

swampy
 
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