Best BBQ for venison

Freeforester

Well-Known Member
A v hot one, they all are capable, maybe consider a Blaser blazer/brazier (pro success with R8-grate :norty:), or a Steyr-fire, or even a Schmidt-pit :coat:use Merkel-charcoal!
 

sauer

Well-Known Member
Depends on your budget

Big green egg or other Kamado ceramic bows are very fuel efficient and hold temps well but expensive and ceramics crack ....

Me for all round bbq and smoking I have a Weber mastertouch kettle bbq...

You can grill hot and fast and do low n slow on it

Lots of accessories and rotisserie etc which I use a lot ...

If want dedicated low n slow hot smoker I have / use the Weber Smokey mountain bullet type smoker ....

Both used all year round and work well and you’ll get both the kettle grill style and a bullet type smoker for Lee’s than the price of a ceramic bbq


Paul
 

Bestman

Well-Known Member
Cheers Paul,

Do you use the low and slow method much with venison? If so does it dry out in the kettle? Nick
 

sauer

Well-Known Member
So far only done a haunch and it was good
best thing to buy for low n slow is digital wireless meat probes ... send temps of the bbq and the internal temp of the meat to a display ..

Takes guesswork out of it ...

Most of the low n slow I’ve done to date is
Pulled pork
Pork belly burnt ends
Brisket

I do all my own burgers and saddles but they are done hot n fast


With bullet smoker you have water pan below the grills but above the coals so your effectively cooking “indirect”

Paul
 

Hayduke

Well-Known Member
I get good results on a Landman Kentucky smoker, it is versatile and affordable (Homebase sell them at under £100 at the end of the season), it will BBQ, hot smoke and cold smoke food.

I really like that Nuke Delta looks the business, $1,300 - ouch , burns a big hole.

Just don't get a gas "BBQ", might as well cook inside. Charcoal, wood and fire is where its at
 

Orion

Well-Known Member
Homebase are currently selling Kamado Joes and will no doubt be outing them at a decent discount at some point when they don’t sell to their customer base.

I’ve had one for some seven years now and use it all year round for hot smoking, grilling, roasting, everything, with all types of food - including as a pizza oven. Very versatile and also controllable throughout the temperature range.
 

pj1

Well-Known Member
Plus one for the Webber kettle and smokey mountain. They are very versatile for pretty much anything. I’ve done beef brisket for 8 hours on the kettle but a lot easier low and slow on the smokey mountain. A new addition this year is a Dutch oven. Hill billy chilli is out of this world

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Gm81

Well-Known Member
I use my small Weber for normal bbq.
Then I have a big one for slow cooking or family bbq.
If you put the coals in one side. Then water in the side under the joint and meat thermometer. Trust me you will love it!
It doesn’t dry out if you use a thermometer and a good amount of seasoning. I will layer it so the seasoning drys and becomes super tasty! Chuck some wood chips on as you go and it’s all good.
I think Webber’s are great. I would love a smoker. But for what i do. I can do it on the big one. You tube is great for tips and ideas
 

pj1

Well-Known Member
Plus 1 on the coals. I thought Weber coals where a step too far and you where only buying the brand name. But no they do last a long time. If you have baskets to keep the coals together they will give good heat for three hours no problem. The other thing we have tried is catering grade lumpwood charcoal. You get an amazing smokey flavour and some fierce heat but they vary a lot between bags. Some lumps are just right some a huge and need the attention of a hammer and other spit bits everywhere.
 

hoofpower

Active Member
For me, the tall round chimney type smoker with the basting tray underneath the meat is the best combo. Marinate the meat well. Set the charcoal in the base at the bottom...... let it stream steady heat and smoke up the smoker, joint goes right at the top. Put the marinade in the basting tray above the hot charcoal..... as the marinade heats up and vaporises up to the meat..... then mixes with the juices from the meat and drips back down into the marinade pan again .... so in essence, the joint is continuously basting itself in the marinade and it's own juices....... just need to experiment with timing....but as always Long and Slow
 

Gm81

Well-Known Member
Plus 1 on the coals. I thought Weber coals where a step too far and you where only buying the brand name. But no they do last a long time. If you have baskets to keep the coals together they will give good heat for three hours no problem. The other thing we have tried is catering grade lumpwood charcoal. You get an amazing smokey flavour and some fierce heat but they vary a lot between bags. Some lumps are just right some a huge and need the attention of a hammer and other spit bits everywhere.
I like the lump wood charcoal too. But I struggle to get the heat right. It’s either a fireball or nearly out. For smoke I add wood chips soaked and dry. That way I can play with different flavours.
This thread makes my mouth water! This week will see some bbq action for sure.
 

pj1

Well-Known Member
Just back from a bbq for a friend new baby / house warming. Brisket on the smokey mountain for 8 hours. Murguiz spiced oak smoked leg of lamb on the kettle. Both where off and resting in time for potato and sweet corn and the surprise star of the show satay rabbit kebabs with peanut sauce. Converted a few to rabbit this evening
 

PKL

Well-Known Member
Best way is fresh shot at camp or wherever your rest, over a fire with a few vegetables and whatever you have, of course, beer!
 

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