Best range for zeroing my 222

UK Outfitters

Mungo

Well-Known Member
Dead on at 50m. Will give you about an inch high at 100 and back on at 150. Perfect for both roe and night time foxes.

I zero at the shorter range because it's less affected by wind (treble can be pushed a long way off by even quite light wind at longer range).
 

Eric the Red

Well-Known Member
I think all the above are common approaches to the process and give a good MPBR. In absolute terms though, you should zero at the range at which you shoot most commonly, whatever that may be.
 

Akeld

Well-Known Member
Depends on your type of shooting, if you tend to point and shoot, go for the 1" high at 100 yards, or if you have a capable scope and dial in shots then dead on at 100 yards and adjust if necessary
 

jonny.c

Well-Known Member
depends on your type of shooting, if you tend to point and shoot, go for the 1" high at 100 yards, or if you have a capable scope and dial in shots then dead on at 100 yards and adjust if necessary

like he said
 

Spix

Well-Known Member
You can pop down to Kynamco and set zero point perfect at any distance upto 100m ; no heat, no sun, no wind, magic
 

Claret_Dabbler

Well-Known Member
Ignoring, the usual rubbish, and assuming normal 222 velocity of 3100-3200FPS with a 50gr bullet, 1" high at 100 yards will leave you 1" low at 200 and that is perfect for 99.something% of what you will ever do with a 222.
 

Crosshair243

Well-Known Member
Ignoring, the usual rubbish,

Hmmmmmmmm. It's that kind of open minded attitude that makes species extinct :rofl:

Depends what he wants to do with it. If he wants to head shoot squirrels then your theory won't work. If he's got a scope with ballistic reticle or turrets then the answer will be different again and if he's got dial-able turrets then zero range practically doesn't matter, as long as you know what it is.

So, to the op, listen to all the rubbish, including that from Claret_Dabbler and make up your own mind which solution suits you.
 

Finch

Well-Known Member
I shoot quite a lot of rabbits with mine out to 300 yards. They're a small target at that range so you need to know what the rifle is doing. I use 40 grn BTs and zero at 200 yards. This gives me effectively point and shoot from 150 to 250 yds with small easily judged holdover to 300 which is the range spread where it sees most action. There's no point saying how high I zero at 75 or 100 yards because different rifles, different twists and different ammo will give different results, so you have to find out for yourself. Set zero at true distance and and shoot at 25 yd intervals from 50 yds to 300. Do it on graph or grid paper and you've plotted the precise trajectory for your rifle/ammo set-up.
I shoot foxes with the same ammo and as most will be lamped they are rarely further than 150 yds, so with that zero and chest or ribcage shots its point and shoot for my foxing needs as well.
 

willowbank

Well-Known Member
I shoot quite a lot of rabbits with mine out to 300 yards. They're a small target at that range so you need to know what the rifle is doing. I use 40 grn BTs and zero at 200 yards. This gives me effectively point and shoot from 150 to 250 yds with small easily judged holdover to 300 which is the range spread where it sees most action. There's no point saying how high I zero at 75 or 100 yards because different rifles, different twists and different ammo will give different results, so you have to find out for yourself. Set zero at true distance and and shoot at 25 yd intervals from 50 yds to 300. Do it on graph or grid paper and you've plotted the precise trajectory for your rifle/ammo set-up.
I shoot foxes with the same ammo and as most will be lamped they are rarely further than 150 yds, so with that zero and chest or ribcage shots its point and shoot for my foxing needs as well.

Thats extraordinarily good shooting, bunnies at 300 yds, what scope are you using?

Regards WB
 

Finch

Well-Known Member
Thats extraordinarily good shooting, bunnies at 300 yds, what scope are you using?

Regards WB

Now a NF NSX 5.5-22X56. Previously a Duralyt but the 10mm@100m increments weren't fine enough for a 200 yd zero and at 300 yds I really needed parallax adjustment. The Zeiss had the better light gathering though, even with the 50mm lens.
Most rabbits shot with the triple (a heavy barrelled CF2) will be between 150 and 250 yds. I'm usually ambush shooting sitting on the ground knees drawn up, or on a folding swivel stool, rifle on a Bogpod tripod. Either stance is very stable, I'm comfortable, relaxed, in control, I've got all the time in the world and I'm always carrying a range finder so I've pinged the terrain. Its not so difficult. Its really little different to shooting paper at 300 yds from a foxhole on the range, which I do every couple of months or so. In that situation I'd expect to be putting most or all of them in a 3" group, wind permitting, 4" at most, which is not comp winning shooting by any means, but its near as damn it a rabbit body shot every time.
I've shot a good many 200 yd rabbits from a standing position off the sticks. Those shots are purely a matter of confidence. Which a good .222 gives you in spades. When I got mine I hadn't really used a CF for regular rabbit shooting. I was used to foxes and deer. It took a little while for my head to accept that if I put the reticle on a rabbit's napper at 200 yds, didn't mess about and got on with it, it really would nail them to order. Confidence in your rifle works wonders for your shooting. And a heavy varminter is particularly good off sticks.
 

Muir

Well-Known Member
You are 100% correct, Mr Finch: It is all a matter of confidence. Three hundred yards isn't far for rabbits with a .222. I have taken beer bottle sized prairiedogs at 400 yards with mine. I shoot a CZ 22 Hornet year round across some very wide open territory and, despite having several other CF small bores, it is my 'go to' rifle for prairiedogs. Yesterday I shot three prairiedogs at 300 yards with my Hornet and tacked an additional two at 265 yards. I use my Hornet extensively, and use the same 34 grain /3100 fps load year in and year out. Over the years I have learned to judge the wind and drop quite accurately so I have more confidence in my abilities with that small round than I do my larger guns. ~Muir
 

hunta

Well-Known Member
Ignoring, the usual rubbish, and assuming normal 222 velocity of 3100-3200FPS with a 50gr bullet, 1" high at 100 yards will leave you 1" low at 200 and that is perfect for 99.something% of what you will ever do with a 222.

I played around with different zero ranges and dialling in but concluded that the above was the most consistent method for me. Point and shoot !
 

Mungo

Well-Known Member
Other than you need to be more precise. An inch group at 50 is 4" at 200 don't forget.

Very true.

Fortunately, it's not hard to get much smaller groups at 50m with a treble. Even with factory amnmo and my somewhat hapahazard marksmanship, single ragged hole groups aren't too surprising.
 
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