Best Way To Get Permission

Jordan

New Member
Hi All,

Myself and a friend have been shooting air rifle on range for some time now, but are struggling to find anyone who will give us permission for small game (rabbit, greys, pigeon) on their land... mainly because we don't know anyone with any land!

Does anyone have any tips on getting permission? It feels like it's a who you know situation so I'm reluctant to approach people I don't know. We're up in Cumbria so theres a lot of land around, just struggling to find anyone who owns it!

Cheers
 

Driver25

Well-Known Member
First off get indemnity insurance and a business card. Then it's all down to leg work Bang on doors on the land to find out who owns the land, bang on the owner's doors, and have your presentation organized. The more local the land the better. Offer corvids & rats as well to farmers and fox. Then if you get the land, apply for a fox rifle. Farmers hate rats, corvids and fox. Most people want to bang rabbits and pigeons, but not so much the other vermin so this will give you an edge.
 

Tim.243

Well-Known Member
Hi All,

Myself and a friend have been shooting air rifle on range for some time now, but are struggling to find anyone who will give us permission for small game (rabbit, greys, pigeon) on their land... mainly because we don't know anyone with any land!

Does anyone have any tips on getting permission? It feels like it's a who you know situation so I'm reluctant to approach people I don't know. We're up in Cumbria so theres a lot of land around, just struggling to find anyone who owns it!

Cheers
Golf courses have rabbits, people with poultry have rats, farms have rats/feral pigeons on feed stock....

You boys need to think out the box....start shooting for a poultry farmer and when you make your pitch to the next farm you can say.. " We shoot rats for mr smith on home farm"

Being reluctant will get you know where, just be polite and when he shuts the door just move on.

DO NOT GO TO ASK AT LUNCH TIME OR TEA TIME....!!

SHOVING PERMISTION SLIPS UNDER FARMERS NOSES TO SHOOT RATS IS A WASTE OF TIME.

IF YOU GET A GO THEN DONT MAKE A MESS SHUT THE GATE THAT YOU UNLOCK AND ASK WHERE YOU SHOULD PUT THE RATS ETC

IF YOU SHOOT ANY RABBITS ASK HIS WIFE WOULD SHE LIKE A COUPLE SKINNED OUT?

AND DONT RUN AROUND DRESSED LIKE RAMBO :rolleyes:


Good luck
 

caberslash

Well-Known Member
Hi All,

Myself and a friend have been shooting air rifle on range for some time now, but are struggling to find anyone who will give us permission for small game (rabbit, greys, pigeon) on their land... mainly because we don't know anyone with any land!

Does anyone have any tips on getting permission? It feels like it's a who you know situation so I'm reluctant to approach people I don't know. We're up in Cumbria so theres a lot of land around, just struggling to find anyone who owns it!

Cheers

If you are an extremely attractive and female (I doubt you are both, because you have this problem) then it is very easy, or so I hear, to get ground and shooting.

Since I am neither, I opted for a job which involved shooting, much to the detriment of my own financial situation and career.

My friends who work in the city could afford all the shooting they every wanted (within reason) but don't have the time or in many cases the inclination.

You have to sell yourself as providing a service, not someone doing you a favour by letting you go shooting on their land. If you have a trade then you already have a foot in the door.

Unfortunately it will only get harder are farmers are swayed by £££'s some of the agents and city boys are willing to pay. Some even sell vermin shooting on here which I think is shameful.

Talk about squeezing every penny out of a stone!

The silver lining of Covid has been that many farmers and foresters have snapped with nothing been done about pest control by their far flung tenants so ground is being opened up again to local boys who are keen and do the job well.
 

Liveonce

Well-Known Member
Feel you frustration but as has been said it is down to doing the leg work, approaching farmers and asking you will get knock backs but with luck will get the permission you seek. See if any agricultural suppliers allow advertising cards to be displayed. Good luck.
 

Reloader708

Well-Known Member
This picture always sticks in my mind when people ask about gaining permission.
The caption being "don't bother a farmer when he's obviously busy... 20210719_190634.jpg
 

BEAR1

Well-Known Member
It's not easy but perseverance pays off , as said go knock on a few doors. One thing I will say is that when you do get permission look after it and don't leave any mess about. I heard only the other day when I was out from a farmer friend that he stopped someone's permission for leaving empty cartridge cases about . This was understandable as he keeps cattle.
 

Nick703

Well-Known Member
This picture always sticks in my mind when people ask about gaining permission.
The caption being "don't bother a farmer when he's obviously busy... View attachment 214135
Get your hands dirty an help him out , could work , I’m a fencer an take an old farmer all my old wood posts for his fire and I pay him the same price as it would cost me to go to the wood recycling plant, can go foxing on his land any time I like ,wouldn’t of got that permission without the fire wood an beer vouchers ,he’d probably have no issues with me taking the odd roe either
 

Jordan

New Member
Thanks all, some good food for thought. Really appreciate all the advice.

Looks like my first thing will be to get some indemnity. Will the one that comes with BASC membership be ok or is it worth getting it elsewhere?
 

samdk

Well-Known Member
Getting permission is one thing, keeping it is another! Seen people blow good opportunities by not using their brain or losing interest after realising the commitment needed for effective vermin/deer control.

Once you get it be polite, professional and consistent. I give regular updates on what I’m shooting or seeing and a drink and card at Christmas never did any harm.

Sam
 

casper

Well-Known Member
Beating is a good door opener and as someone else has already said offer to control the pests that others can't be bothered with.
If you have a good trade exploit it, a few years ago I called at a farm and enquired about some pigeon shooting "we don't need nobody" was the reply.
A few days later a sparky I know called at the same farm in his work van asking the same question, farmer told him he could have as much shooting as he wanted in return for a quick electrical job doing.
 

caberslash

Well-Known Member
If you have a good trade exploit it, a few years ago I called at a farm and enquired about some pigeon shooting "we don't need nobody" was the reply.
A few days later a sparky I know called at the same farm in his work van asking the same question, farmer told him he could have as much shooting as he wanted in return for a quick electrical job doing.

I'd also beware the landowner who uses their land as a carrot. All fine and dandy till you get the stick in return.
 

Cottis

Well-Known Member
I'd also beware the landowner who uses their land as a carrot. All fine and dandy till you get the stick in return.
I would be inclined to agree with this.

I mean if you get your foot in the door that is one thing but if the farmer had such an issue with pests, he would have been more interested in the first guy who turned up. Offering shooting to a tradesman because he is too tight to pay for it smacks of a farmer who does not really have a pest issue or not one he is bothered about. When this is the case, you will almost certainly encounter a problem at some point.

The best land to have permission on, is the type where the land owner has pest control issues and is genuinely happy to see you there as much as poss.

If there is one thing that hacks me off, it is putting in effort to sort out people's issues and then feeling like you are the one who is doing them a favour rather than vice versa. It works both ways and whilst the shooter should feel more than enough credit by being afforded access to private land, it should not be at the expense of him feeling like he shouldn't be there.

I have walked off people's land in the past when this happens. I don't need the hassle. Happy to do folk a favour but it works both ways. I guess in the first instance though, any land is better than nothing, especially in terms of getting experience.

I recall shooting on a golf course years ago and the owners were quite obstructive in terms of access during night hours which is when rabbit control needed to be done. This was also a course I played at regularly at the time, so I was a known person to them. The course had a major issue with rabbits and by my estimation, the thick end of a 600-800 needed shooting in the first few weeks/months and then consistent visits once a week thereafter. I was asked to basically shoot between the last golfer leaving the course and dusk which basically left no time to do the job and relied on my being able to be there at very precise and changeable hours. I tried for a short while but it was impossible and I told them why but was met with the same old resistance. I just told them that I wasn't going to be responsible for doing a half arsed job so they would need to find someone else. Obviously they failed and the course got absolutely hammered by those bunnies. Fast forward a few months when the real damage happened and they requested my help in quite a terse impolite way. I simply told them politely I was not interested in helping them anymore and why I wasn't prepared to do them such a massive favour when I had warned them about the impending damage, why their approach was wrong and how the issue should be dealt with. I outlined the cost to myself in ammunition and fuel and why I felt they should use way more foresight when assessing helpful folk in the future.

Some people are idiots. You need to stay away from those folk. They will stitch you up if something suits them that way.
 

Woodsmoke

Well-Known Member
Some even sell vermin shooting on here which I think is shameful.
It certainly is!

Long gone are the days when estate managers would pay a bounty on rat tails and queen wasps, but pest and vermin control is still an essential and onerous duty on landowners. I'm only 51, but I can remember when farmers would provide cartridges to anyone prepared to shoot crows and pigeons for them. Charging for it is an absolute p1sstake!

Anyhoo, that aside, you need to remember that you're actually offering a service. Sure, you'd like somewhere to shoot, but they're not doing you the favour here. Quite the opposite
 
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