Big game hunting - marmite

Ade8mm

Well-Known Member
I too have (so far) not had the chance to hunt in Africa though I have been there a number of times. I live in the hope that one day I will be able to.

Yes there are clearly a few dodgy outfits but then isn't that always the case whether it be in hunting, shooting, stalking or indeed any form of business or human endeavour? That does not mean it (Hunting in Africa) should be judged by the lowest common denominator.

In so far as on-line petitions are concerned it should be noted that they are "free" (no such thing as a free lunch blah blah blah) but will accept donations, I think you will find that most , if not , all on-line subscription operations are set up with the sole intention of gathering data . Data has an increasing value and it should be remembered that GDPR is not a worldwide regulation. Anyone who clicks on one of these petitions has no clue as to what is being done with their details. Yes It may only be an email address , but it has value and WILL be sold to God knows who.

The term "Trophy Hunting" is now being applied to pretty much all hunting in Africa. It is an emotive term and makes good headlines and sells news copy.

So be it. It is the World we live in. I will still boil a head, skin a fox - if it is a good skin or skin a hare for fly-tying ( I have shot one hare in the last 30 years and that was at the request of the land owner. He wanted the hares shot simply to stop the pikeys with dogs poaching his land. I appreciate one hare would not make much difference but there you go. See below- poaching).

So what?

Having killed the creature, what is not to be eaten (not including fox you understand!) will only decay. So why not keep the head, horns, teeth or antlers?

To think anyone would travel half way round the world at great expense, (much of which goes into the communities that conserve game in areas that might otherwise be turned over to farming - with very poor and unsustainable yields , pays for anti-poaching measures = preserves game) just for a "Trophy" is madness.

Sadly , in the world we find ourselves in the nay sayers have only one thought in mind.

"How could you kill such a beautiful creature for fun?"

That is what we are up against and I fear any reasoned argument one might make, which most likely will involve preservation, will fall on deaf ears.

If Mankind had not been a hunter for pretty much the whole of its existence, up until a few thousand years ago (nothing in anthropological time) mankind would have died out a very long time ago. So all the anti-hunting people should feel most uncomfortable about the fact they exist. (but they wont, because they ain't interested in facts)

Hey-ho
 
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sikamalc

Administrator
Site Staff
You would be surprised what the local people will eat in Africa. Protein is in short supply and meat is in high demand in remote regions. There are VERY VERY few animals that are not eaten. One only has to look at the bush meat trade, where illegally killed game is sold off. Primates on the west coast are often killed and eaten, including chimps and in the past Gorilla too.
About the only animals that are not eaten in Africa are Hyaenas and Cats. But everything else is gladly devoured in Africa. But I am sure in some parts of Africa even Cat will be eaten if offered.

People over here have NO idea about Africa present and past at times. One of the biggest problems is the opening up of virgin forest in western Africa and the roads into them. Once a road is there the poachers are there, access is easier and the chinese are often involved with road construction and the animal medicinal black market trade.

Legal and ethical big game hunting has increased wildlife numbers in Africa since the second war, not reduced them.
 

Ade8mm

Well-Known Member
You would be surprised what the local people will eat in Africa. Protein is in short supply and meat is in high demand in remote regions. There are VERY VERY few animals that are not eaten. One only has to look at the bush meat trade, where illegally killed game is sold off. Primates on the west coast are often killed and eaten, including chimps and in the past Gorilla too.
About the only animals that are not eaten in Africa are Hyaenas and Cats. But everything else is gladly devoured in Africa. But I am sure in some parts of Africa even Cat will be eaten if offered.

People over here have NO idea about Africa present and past at times. One of the biggest problems is the opening up of virgin forest in western Africa and the roads into them. Once a road is there the poachers are there, access is easier and the chinese are often involved with road construction and the animal medicinal black market trade.

Legal and ethical big game hunting has increased wildlife numbers in Africa since the second war, not reduced them.
Well said that man
 

mchughcb

Well-Known Member
Most animals that could be domesticated has ensured their survival as they are too valuable too allow extinction.
 

mchughcb

Well-Known Member
I’ll copy roughly what someone typed on a thread few months back that stuck with me....


I go out I hunt a deer to fill the freezer for my family ... for some that’s ok ...

But if I keep the antlers and put on my wall so I sit with a dram on an evening and reminisce about the day and watching the beast and say a quiet thank you ..... I’m a trophy hunter ?


Paul
No, but if you have to buy a new house just so you can fill a room with heads, then I'll say you are a trophy hunter. I have a friend exactly like this. My wife doesn't want a new house so its no trophies for me.
 

jer

Well-Known Member
Scientists: Banning trophy hunting 'doesn't protect animals' Banning trophy hunting 'doesn't protect animals'
Refreshing to see it on the Beeb.
Very nice to see some informed scientific opinion aired but it always annoys hugely when it's not accompanied by the compelling evidence mentioned as a reference document. Hopefully it includes statistics from the various African countries showing how the benefits of trophy hunting impact animal and human welfare in those countries. It is difficult to argue against factual statistics but even scientific opinion is always challenged by those who feed on emotion rather than fact such as the campaign against trophy hunting. If such a document was published and aired by mainstream media channels it would stop the bullsh1t and outpouring of emotion from the uninformed masses.
 

josh3105

Well-Known Member
I cant believe the level of ignorance of some people on this site, who the hell are we to tell other people how to manage their animal populations?

If you pay for stalking on someone elses ground (regardless of meat retention, trophies etc) but are anti-African hunting, you need to re-evaluate whether you should be hunting.

If you have never stepped foot on the African continent or experienced any of its rural culture, you need to re-evaluate whether you deserve an opinion.

The hypocrisy of any hunter in the UK that disagrees with other global hunting whether its hunting Markhor in the Pakistani mountains, managing the bear population of North America with a bow or hunting pigs with dogs in NZ is beyond me. We are all in this together and until people realise that, we can continue to wave our beloved sport down the toilet.
 

josh3105

Well-Known Member
On the flip side, it is very refreshing to see a number of true hunting folk supporting eachother on here!
 

geoshot

Well-Known Member
About the only animals that are not eaten in Africa are Hyaenas and Cats. But everything else is gladly devoured in Africa. But I am sure in some parts of Africa even Cat will be eaten if offered.
The gardener at our staff house in Takoradi, Ghana used to regularly pinch cats from about the place, they're considered a real delicacy in that part of the world. I haven't heard of anyone eating big cats on a regular basis, but I wouldn't be surprised if it happens. I think that Hyenas are too much even for the starving to eat.
 

Cumbrian 1

Well-Known Member
The gardener at our staff house in Takoradi, Ghana used to regularly pinch cats from about the place, they're considered a real delicacy in that part of the world. I haven't heard of anyone eating big cats on a regular basis, but I wouldn't be surprised if it happens. I think that Hyenas are too much even for the starving to eat.
When I took my lion in Cameroon the staff ate every bit of it they believed that by eating the lion they would absorb its strength, not sure if that is physically possible but they had one hell of a party that night.
 

Safari Hunter

Well-Known Member
I'm reading these comments with interest guys as being an Outfitters agent it is refreshing to see the majority are looking out for us.
One thing becomes apparent and that is nobody has mentioned the lack of African Outfitters at ther Game Fair. The BSS did it up front but the Game fair did it slyly and basically said any outfitter needs to be ABTA/ATOL regsitered before they can attend as they are selling holidays.
I have also complained to a council member at BASC about their write up on Lion Hunting in the magazine this month. This does no good for anything.
Cheers
Adrian
 

VSS

Well-Known Member
I have also complained to a council member at BASC about their write up on Lion Hunting in the magazine this month. This does no good for anything.
Cheers
Adrian
Although not very well written, the article was specifically about "canned" hunting, and the dubious welfare standards of captive lions bred for the purpose.
Surely this is something that all true hunter's should deplore, and distance themselves from?
I would agree though, that a positive article about sustainable trophy hunting in any magazine would be more beneficial than a negative article about canned hunting, as it all gets lumped together in the (non shooting) readers' mind anyway.
 

Safari Hunter

Well-Known Member
S
Although not very well written, the article was specifically about "canned" hunting, and the dubious welfare standards of captive lions bred for the purpose.
Surely this is something that all true hunter's should deplore, and distance themselves from?
I would agree though, that a positive article about sustainable trophy hunting in any magazine would be more beneficial than a negative article about canned hunting, as it all gets lumped together in the (non shooting) readers' mind anyway.
Totally agree but there is a big difference between captive bred Lion hunting and Canned hunting. They are not the same thing.

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