Bipod size help

#1
I am pretty sure you guys will have been over this loads but I'm looking for some opinions
What's yor preferred bipod size?
Im looking at a Harris 12-25 to go on my .243 I use for stalking/foxing/lamping etc.
But keep thinking its a bit bulky when not in use

Thanks
 

Eddie P

Well-Known Member
#3
Size depends a lot on the shooter's gut. I'm slim and had to get the shortest.

Try some on your rifle and see what works for you.
 

Gunner223

Well-Known Member
#6
Ive been down this road, in the end I bought the 9-13, and a good set of sticks, and when foxing/stalking I use the sticks 99% of the time.
 
#7
So effectively it comes down to personal choice. On lowland I would tend to agree that a 9-13 is sufficient - unless you like to take sitting/kneeling shots over prone/standing. I have gone with a 12-25 as it gives me more options. Weight addition is negligible - and allows me to get more stable if windy etc., or if crops/grass is up, or if shooting on a steep incline. I do tend to take the majority of shots off sticks, but have been grateful on a number of occasions for the additional option. Just make sure you buy a 12-25, over a 13.5-27 as the longer is very difficult to use prone (belly statement previously made notwithstanding) - HTH
 

jcampbellsmith

Well-Known Member
#8
So effectively it comes down to personal choice. On lowland I would tend to agree that a 9-13 is sufficient - unless you like to take sitting/kneeling shots over prone/standing. I have gone with a 12-25 as it gives me more options. Weight addition is negligible - and allows me to get more stable if windy etc., or if crops/grass is up, or if shooting on a steep incline. I do tend to take the majority of shots off sticks, but have been grateful on a number of occasions for the additional option. Just make sure you buy a 12-25, over a 13.5-27 as the longer is very difficult to use prone (belly statement previously made notwithstanding) - HTH
Very well put. Thanks JCS
 

FGYT

Well-Known Member
#9
So effectively it comes down to personal choice. On lowland I would tend to agree that a 9-13 is sufficient - unless you like to take sitting/kneeling shots over prone/standing. I have gone with a 12-25 as it gives me more options. Weight addition is negligible - and allows me to get more stable if windy etc., or if crops/grass is up, or if shooting on a steep incline. I do tend to take the majority of shots off sticks, but have been grateful on a number of occasions for the additional option. Just make sure you buy a 12-25, over a 13.5-27 as the longer is very difficult to use prone (belly statement previously made notwithstanding) - HTH
thats why i chose a modular Bipod I can swap out legs in seconds and even Clip legs together to take the whole thing off

or tripod mount

8"-11"
12983930_10207788269802790_4625127256765959675_o.jpg

12" -19" legs
12973480_10207788280803065_1091644570203785124_o.jpg

Both sets clipped together and extended
Dsc_0877.jpg
 

Pedro

Well-Known Member
#10
Going to be a bit controversial here. Maybe.

I think that bipods are overrated. I've got them on my rifles, but I am struggling to remember the last time I actually used them whilst out and about. I either have to shoot off hand if in a bit of a hurry or most often use another means of steadying things, be it sticks, trees, walls, fences or whatever. Although they are a great boon when I go to the range, or zeroing on a permission. In fact, having written this, I rather think I might try taking them off, save the weight and see how it goes.
 

diverdave

Well-Known Member
#11
All these things depend on the environment they are to be used in. Most of my stalking is open hill heather moorland, it has almost no trees, and no walls or fences. The deep heather needs the 27 inch bipod or sticks, smaller bipods would be a waste of time. However your height / arm / neck length also makes a difference. My bipod on its minimum setting is ideal for me zeroing or if we get a chance of a shot on clear ground. However a couple of my stalking pals cannot use them on minimum setting as it cranks their neck over and they struggle for perfect eye relief, so are forced to use the smaller bipod, when the longer one is far better suited to our needs, resorting to sticks when i can often get a far more stable shot of the longer bipod.
 

FGYT

Well-Known Member
#12
Going to be a bit controversial here. Maybe.

I think that bipods are overrated. I've got them on my rifles, but I am struggling to remember the last time I actually used them whilst out and about. I either have to shoot off hand if in a bit of a hurry or most often use another means of steadying things, be it sticks, trees, walls, fences or whatever. Although they are a great boon when I go to the range, or zeroing on a permission. In fact, having written this, I rather think I might try taking them off, save the weight and see how it goes.

I prefer to have one on at least even if its to stop me laying the rifle down in wet grass (or dusty ) when i need to but yes most of my shooting Hunting its not used also why a QD option is good as you can take it on and off in seconds
 
#13
If you do any hill stalking you will find 9-13 is a bit short, sticks are not really suitable for hill stalking, so its either a longer bipod or resorting
rolled up jackets, spotting scope case or whatever as we did before bipods came on the market.
 

jcampbellsmith

Well-Known Member
#14
If you do any hill stalking you will find 9-13 is a bit short, sticks are not really suitable for hill stalking, so its either a longer bipod or resorting
rolled up jackets, spotting scope case or whatever as we did before bipods came on the market.
Spot on. Once upon a time I shot a nice switch off the stalker's gas mask bag that had his flask and piece in it. Best regards JCS
 
#16
I find sitting with B&Q sticks/Exhaust Rubber Ring is good for if the growth is a bit too high for a normal moderator.

Even better if you can get your back rested on a tree or fence post for added stability.

With this you have an effective high bipod.
 
#17
I find sitting with B&Q sticks/Exhaust Rubber Ring is good for if the growth is a bit too high for a normal moderator.

Even better if you can get your back rested on a tree or fence post for added stability.

With this you have an effective high bipod.


Yes but still not good for hill stalking, no trees and very few fences, due to the terrain 99.9% shots need to be taken prone so its either a bipod or rolled up jacket or similar , agreed that for woodland stalking a pair of sticks will cover most situations.
 

tusker

Well-Known Member
#18
Going to be a bit controversial here. Maybe.

I think that bipods are overrated. I've got them on my rifles, but I am struggling to remember the last time I actually used them whilst out and about. I either have to shoot off hand if in a bit of a hurry or most often use another means of steadying things, be it sticks, trees, walls, fences or whatever. Although they are a great boon when I go to the range, or zeroing on a permission. In fact, having written this, I rather think I might try taking them off, save the weight and see how it goes.
Couldn't agree more. Having had them on my rifles for more than 10 years I would rather use sticks. Just got back from Namibia and took them off after the first day. They are good for zeroing etc.
Tusker.
 

SJC

Well-Known Member
#19
9-13 works ok for me, but then that's is all I have. It does spend most of its life on 13 rather than 9. It's nice to be able to get above the heather a grass so I'd not say no to a little more length. But then the only time it goes on the rifle is When I am on the hill or laid out waiting, and that isn't that often.
 

Tom D

Well-Known Member
#20
I don't own one, I zero off a bag or coat, and in the field like others have said I just use the lay of the land. I much prefer the feel of the rifle without some scaffolding bolted on the front. At this time of year round here you's be very lucky to get a shot off one as the legs would need to be 3' long to get above the crops / grass etc.
 

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