Bit of a problem.

BRACES of Bristol - Mauser M12 with Schmidt & Bender 2.5-10x56 Illuminated Scope

Moonraker68

Well-Known Member
I was working the bolt on one of my rifles after cleaning it earlier this week, when the bolt started to intermittently fire on closing. My fingers were nowhere near the trigger, and fortunately it has never happened in the field. Needless to say, this is of serious concern to me, and I know it is a job for a riflesmith to sort out. Any idea what the cause might be? I have a second deer calibre rifle, so this one won't be taken out again until its been sorted.
 

GP1

Well-Known Member
Possible that either trigger sear could be worn or the trigger spring damaged or broken
 

JMS906

Well-Known Member
I was working the bolt on one of my rifles after cleaning it earlier this week, when the bolt started to intermittently fire on closing. My fingers were nowhere near the trigger, and fortunately it has never happened in the field. Needless to say, this is of serious concern to me, and I know it is a job for a riflesmith to sort out. Any idea what the cause might be? I have a second deer calibre rifle, so this one won't be taken out again until its been sorted.

I had a similar problem with my Winchester model 70. A very small piece of the [non factory] bedding compound had broken up and was applying pressure in just the wrong place. Each time I pushed the safety forwards, it released the f.pin. Have yoiu had your rifle out of the stock? Even if you haven't take it out and have a very close look at the stock, and the trigger mechanism. It might be something simple. Check the sears are not damaged.

-JMS
 

DaveK

Well-Known Member
What did you clean it with and did you wipe all of it off the sear? Same happened to me and I found it was down to the sear having a coating of oil.
 

Moonraker68

Well-Known Member
Thanks for the replies. It was just a routine clean of the bore with wipe-out. I use a bore guide, and didn't remove the stock, so I don't think anything should have come into contact with the trigger mechanism.
 

8x57

Distinguished Member
What did you clean it with and did you wipe all of it off the sear? Same happened to me and I found it was down to the sear having a coating of oil.

I would be severely concerned if this happened and it was found to be caused by just oil getting on the surface of the sear, doesn't sound like correct engagement of the sear to me.
 

EMcC

Well-Known Member
If its a Remington, its a known problem apparently
This is no longer extant.
Over the years I have had quite a few Remingtons and a few of them I have had for quite a few years and never had a problem.
The only time I have ever come across the problem mentioned was with a friend's rifle and that was a Winchester, it frightened the life out of me but luckily the friend was very safety/muzzle aware.
 

bewsher500

Well-Known Member
could be as simple as some crap in the trigger mechanism leaving you with little or no contact between bolt cocking piece, sear and trigger

its a DIY investigation IMO (may not be a DIY fix depending on what you find!)

whip the action out of the stock and have a good look at where the bolt engages with the trigger mechanism, worth taking the trigger of depending on design and giving it a damn good clean.
don't oil it though. dry lube if you must, will just attract more crud if you do
 

bobjs

Well-Known Member
just clean the trigger mech ( i leave my trigger sears dry) and if you have a tin of air (the stuff you blow clean a keyboard with) us that, i use this stuff on my rifles in the past, and being a bit of a trigger fan it should work out ok,

bob.
 

Moray Outfitting

Well-Known Member
Could be various things.

If it turns out that new parts are required, there is a supplier in Sweden ( I think ) that purchased the back stock of parts when Varberger/ Lakelander shut. With my usual prowess on the IT front I can't find the web address - I saved it 'somewhere' on the PC. Will have a look.
 

Nod-1

Well-Known Member
I was working the bolt on one of my rifles after cleaning it earlier this week, when the bolt started to intermittently fire on closing. My fingers were nowhere near the trigger, and fortunately it has never happened in the field. Needless to say, this is of serious concern to me, and I know it is a job for a riflesmith to sort out. Any idea what the cause might be? I have a second deer calibre rifle, so this one won't be taken out again until its been sorted.


I think a job best left for a gunsmith! forget try this and try that get the rifle to your gunsmith and be safe.
 

finnbear270

Well-Known Member
Why not have a Gunsmith clean your rifle for you too?................... Surely a simple examination of the "Usual suspects" could save an expensive visit to a Gunsmith, If you cannot resolve it by a careful look see, then yes, Gunsmith it is!:-|
 

8x57

Distinguished Member
It's a Varberger 6.5x55, I bought it s/h two years ago, and it's always performed faultlessly up to now.

I had a Varberger some years ago and I had a similar problem. The cause was the trigger return spring had broken and needed to be replaced. Simple job done in five minutes in the gun shop but it does require the action to be lifted out of the stock. To check if it is this simply push the trigger forward as you close the bolt.
 
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